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9 Worst Items to Put on Your Resume

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Replies to: 9 Worst Items to Put on Your Resume

  • MillancadMillancad 5917 replies24 threads Senior Member
    I'm probably better at LaTeX these days than I am at Microsoft Word... and I'm still not very good at LaTeX! But I I started using LaTeX for my sophomore year and loved it, eventually writing presentations and class notes with it as well. It felt right to LaTeX my resume.
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  • GaussianIntegerGaussianInteger 88 replies2 threads Junior Member
    It's more the exception rather than the rule, but I believe significant high school awards definitely belong on a résumé. If you won the USAMO or ISTS, made one of the olympiad camps, or did significant research in high school (like RSI), you have demonstrated exceptional skill that doesn't disappear just because you went to college. Of course, hopefully you would keep up this kind of performance in college in ways that you could show an employer, but there aren't nearly as many significant competitions in college.
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  • baktraxbaktrax 2561 replies2 threads Senior Member
    It's more the exception rather than the rule, but I believe significant high school awards definitely belong on a résumé. If you won the USAMO or ISTS, made one of the olympiad camps, or did significant research in high school (like RSI), you have demonstrated exceptional skill that doesn't disappear just because you went to college. Of course, hopefully you would keep up this kind of performance in college in ways that you could show an employer, but there aren't nearly as many significant competitions in college.

    My feeling about this is that you should have kept up this sort of performance in college for it to be really meaningful, or else, it's just something you did four years ago but haven't done anything related since. If you have nothing else to put and need to take up space, then that's fine, put it on. But a resume has limited space and accomplishments in high school should really be dropped at some point for (hopefully) better and more recent accomplishments. If you did research in high school, that's great, but if you haven't done any in the four years during college, then the fact that you did research in high school is going to mean very little to future employers or grad school. If you have room for it, sure you can put it, but hopefully, you'll have had more recent and significant research experience that you can replace it with. If it's on a CV, then maybe you can include it because you have more room. But really, at some point, it becomes less relevant or impressive. I don't care what you did in high school. I care what you can do now.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 82836 replies738 threads Senior Member
    It's more the exception rather than the rule, but I believe significant high school awards definitely belong on a résumé.

    For high school stuff, "significant" would have a much higher threshold for a resume of a college student than a high school student. Perhaps only if it has a direct relation to the job being sought, or is something that connects with continued achievements in college, would it be significant enough.
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  • jdjuniorjdjunior 4 replies0 threads New Member
    No one wants to deal with a long resume, especially when the details are irrelevant. I think it's really important to cater your resume to the job you are applying to and because of that every resume you submit should be different. In my experience, the easiest way to do this is to use the job description posted, which gives you everything to include. A lot of big companies that receive hundreds or even thousands of applications for each job opening will use a computer program to screen resumes and including key terms from the job posting can help you get through this initial screening process.
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  • JobblyCoJobblyCo 5 replies0 threads New Member
    The most common thing here (not just for the resume, but also for the recruitment process overall, is to show the employer what a) value you bring to the company and b) why you want to work for the company (not only does the company get a motivated and passionate employee; recruitment processes are expensive). This does not just apply to full time recruitment but to intern recruitment as well - interns are hired bcs they seem like fit candidates for the future (and internships are a cost-effective way to test them).

    I don't agree with that an applicant should over analyze use of wording bcs of a risk of being 'over sophisticated'. Let your personality shine and if you normally use a lot of 'over-sophisticated' words, it really doesn't make sense to hide your personality.
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  • wrathofachilleswrathofachilles 761 replies11 threads Member
    I'm not totally sure I agree with the "no stuff from high school" advice. I mean yes, obviously nobody cares which clubs you were a member of, but if you have truly impressive accomplishments from your high school years, I think you can get away with listing them well into college and beyond. For example, if you were the valedictorian of your high school, I think it's fair game to put it on your resume. Same with National AP Scholar or IB Diploma Recipient.
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  • BronzethekingBronzetheking 14 replies2 threads New Member
    number 7 is still applicable today. my dad which is 50 years old, knows only few things on microsoft word.
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  • comfortablycurtcomfortablycurt 2145 replies36 threads Senior Member
    I can agree with some of these, but definitely not all. As others have already mentioned, many job descriptions specifically mention proficiency with Word, Excel, Power Point, etc. Not everyone is completely proficient with it. I work at the tutoring center at my community college, and we have plenty of older students coming in for help mainly because they're unfamiliar with computers in general, and need help learning the basics of using a computer. With the prevalence of online components in so many classes these days, technology has become an additional barrier that a lot of students have to get through. There are plenty of younger students that struggle with all of it too. I think proficiency in Office is worth mentioning, but it should not be at the top of ones list of skills by any means. It also depends on the job. Proficiency with Office is completely irrelevant for many jobs.

    I can agree with a lot of these points. It's really easy to write a resume or CV with incredibly dry, generic, and repetitive language. With some careful language, it's easy to make any job or experience sound more impressive than it may have actually been.

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  • surfer2attorneysurfer2attorney 15 replies5 threads New Member
    I think the last line about interests is not necessary for any resume. That's something you would mention in a cover letter. i.e. sports marketing job -- i'm a marketing major with x experience and I am also very passionate about sports from my years as a soccer coach.
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  • jym626jym626 57415 replies3010 threads Senior Member
    This is an old thread, @networkinggrad
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  • BarryMannersBarryManners 4 replies0 threads New Member
    7. Microsoft word
    Such an obvious one. A 5 yrs old child can also say yes to it... :))
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