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Best Major to Pair with a Business Degree

I am currently planning to major in business (concentrations in finance and management) at a target undergraduate school. I want to double major and add something that will make me more appealing to big consulting firms after college. I am looking for something more analytical and quantitative such as economics or statistics. Which major, out of these two or another, would be a better combination with business?

Replies to: Best Major to Pair with a Business Degree

  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,239 Senior Member
    edited November 2016
    Frankly, anything can make you more attractive, including what's not obvious. If you're in Finance, you should have plenty of quantitative classes, and if you feel the need to beef that up, add a couple more math/econometrics classes.
    You know what recent successful recruits have told me? They said, somewhat surprisingly, what pushed them over the line was often something like philosophy, art history, specific sport expertise/practice, etc. Something that made them stand out compared to others and was interesting to talk about. Learn about consulting firms' culture, what they value.

    This, of course, assumes you're at a target and doing well in your major + have relevant internship experience.
  • chriswchrisw Registered User Posts: 1,585 Senior Member
    I completely echo the previous poster. Consulting firms are awash with qualified business candidates, many of whom have checked all of the quantitative/STEM boxes, and many of whom have completely ignored soft skills (such as writing, critical reasoning, etc.) that are a focus of humanities and social sciences.

    You can be a statistical mastermind, but your clients won't be. If you can't translate your results into statements that executives (who have at least fifteen things as important as your work on their minds) can instantaneously understand, then your brilliant findings will fall flat. Here's the example: Nate Silver.. now, his brand took a bit of a beating after the election, but less of one than other pollsters' brands. What enabled his rise to prominence is not his statistical techniques and modeling skills - his are neither the most advanced nor the best - but his ability to communicate his findings in such a way that anybody can understand them.

    Food for thought...

    (also, just FYI, I've been in consulting for five and a half years and graduated with a political science major and German minor, so I'm not just blowing smoke here!)
  • FedMasterFedMaster Registered User Posts: 83 Junior Member
    Architecture degree, IT, or comp science degree because BUSINESS ARCHITECTS GET PAID >150k
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,048 Senior Member
    @FedMaster A business architect does not study "architecture" in college.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,239 Senior Member
    I think #3 was a joke, right? :)
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,048 Senior Member
    @MYOS1634 There is a field called "business architecture" but it has nothing to do with the profession of architecture as the word is commonly used.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 38,239 Senior Member
    edited November 2016
    I know...I'm guessing FedMaster was making a joke, because a degree in (actual) architecture wouldn't help a finance major with "business architecture"... at least i think it was a joke from Fedmaster?.
  • FedMasterFedMaster Registered User Posts: 83 Junior Member
    Ya it was a joke my dad is a business architect
This discussion has been closed.