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Junior Grades vs. Senior Grades

TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,224 Senior Member
edited January 2006 in Law School
It seems that most people applying to Law School do so in the Fall of their undergraduate Senior year.

From this it follows that grades through only Junior year are available. Is it a case similar to that of applying to undergraduate college from high school, that the basic decisions are made on the grades through junior year? So it would seem...but I don't want to take anything for granted.

If so, then what sort of latitude does a student have in terms of Senior grades. E.g., if one applies with, say, a 3.9 through junior year, do the law schools expect that 3.9 to be maintained through graduation?

Hypotheticals, hypotheticals....
Post edited by TheDad on

Replies to: Junior Grades vs. Senior Grades

  • akafizzleakafizzle Registered User Posts: 412 Member
    I would think that a 3.9 to say a 3.7 wouldn't deter them; however, a 3.9 to a 3.5 raises eyebrows...at least mine would be raised. :p
  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    I would think that a 3.9 to say a 3.7 wouldn't deter them; however, a 3.9 to a 3.5 raises eyebrows...at least mine would be raised.

    Would not deter them from rescinding an acceptance? That does not make sense.

    Your post is uncorroborated.
  • TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,224 Senior Member
    Well, akafizzle parsed the sense of my question perfectly well. As for corroboration, that's what I'm asking for: yes, no, maybe.
  • im_blueim_blue Registered User Posts: 2,142 Senior Member
    If you apply and are accepted early in the application cycle, like November of December, then obviously your senior grades don't matter at all. However, law schools commonly waitlist applicants until as late as the summer, so senior grades will play a role there.

    I don't think law schools rescind acceptances as much as colleges do. A lot of times the only condition of acceptance is graduating college before the first day of classes. My friend got into a school with a 3.5 and let his GPA drop to 3.0 and nothing happened to him.
  • akafizzleakafizzle Registered User Posts: 412 Member
    Well of course my post is uncorroborated; it is an opinion. Opinions do not necessarily have to be confirmed although it'd be nice to have it. However, responding to the criticism of my choice of vocabulary, which was by the way incorrect usage, I apologize for creating confusion. Nonetheless, I BELIEVE (key phrase now) admissions officers would not revoke one's admission to their institute if one's UGPA fell two-tenths of a point. In contrast, if it fell four-tenths of a point, then it would raise eyebrows. Now as for corroboration TheDad, I do not think anyone on this forum can actually corroborate or substantially argue against my post unless he or she is or was an admissions officer. They can however make logical presumptions of what admissions committees may think when evaluating one's application. I hope this helps...
  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    Now as for corroboration TheDad, I do not think anyone on this forum can actually corroborate or substantially argue against my post unless he or she is or was an admissions officer.

    Really? I thought empirical evidence was quite substantive.

    Such as:
    My friend got into a school with a 3.5 and let his GPA drop to 3.0 and nothing happened to him.

    Works better than platitudes.
    logical presumptions

    They are not logical.
  • akafizzleakafizzle Registered User Posts: 412 Member
    Quote:
    My friend got into a school with a 3.5 and let his GPA drop to 3.0 and nothing happened to him.

    Schools vary in decision-making. Just because Georgetown for example disregarded it doesn't mean that NYU will do the same.

    And yes, evidence can be very viable under the right circumstances. The query about admissions committees' views towards one's GPA transition cannot be consistently corroborated with evidence unless it is from the institute to which he or she was accepted. Why? Because I believe subjectivity is used more so than objectivity when assessing one's application and you cannot place firm evidence based on biased thoughts or views. Essentially, most of the evaluations is based on admissions officers' orientations or attitudes.

    Nspeds, why are you bashing me? I'm just trying to help the man as I would want him to help me. I understand you're trying to help also and undermine reckless posts but come on...give me the benefit of the doubt.
  • sreissreis Registered User Posts: 752 Member
    Yeah nspeds isn't that one of the first things you learn in philosophy, to say what something *is* rather than what something isn't? How about everyone read the original post and respond to it, and we'll judge on our own. Instead of saying that something else doesn't make sense, just say something that does make sense, it'll be fine.
  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    Yeah nspeds isn't that one of the first things you learn in philosophy, to say what something *is* rather than what something isn't?

    You are incorrect.

    Edit: akfizzle and I settled our discussion through the private messaging system. I would be more than happy to belittle your 'truism of philosophy,' but I am not sure that the thread-starter would appreciate it.
  • TheDadTheDad Registered User, ! Posts: 10,224 Senior Member
    Informed opinion counts as corroboration in my book. It's a case of caveat emptor as to whether I determine an opinion to be informed.
  • ariesathenaariesathena Registered User Posts: 5,087 Senior Member
    Not sure about individual law school's policies on maintaining grades (akin to senior year ED acceptances), but I know that many law schools will request that first semester (and second semester, as decisions are made up until August) grades be sent in when received.

    Some decisions are made by December, but a lot of decisions are made in February and March - so D's 1st semester senior grades will probably be evaluated.
This discussion has been closed.