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Does the undergraduate school matter?

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Replies to: Does the undergraduate school matter?

  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    If you transfer to a more prestigious school it will not make much of a difference if you are not strong on these types of tests.

    On the contrary, students applying from the top tier can afford to score couple points lower than your typical state-school applicant, and still have a better chance at a top law school.

    Georgetown Law Center does not even require an LSAT from Georgetown students who apply in their junior year!
    http://www.law.georgetown.edu/admissions/jd_general.html#eassure
  • sakkysakky - Posts: 14,759 Senior Member
    On the contrary, students applying from the top tier can afford to score couple points lower than your typical state-school applicant, and still have a better chance at a top law school.

    I don't know about that, the data seems to indicate that this isn't true.

    For example, take a look at the GPA's and LSAT scores of admitted Yale and Berkeley prelaws to the top law schools. You will notice that, by and large, those admitted prelaws had the same stats as the average admitted prelaws (from all undergrad programs).

    http://www.yale.edu/career/students/gradprof/lawschool/media/statistics2004.pdf
    http://career.berkeley.edu/Law/lawStats.stm#school
  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    I don't know about that, the data seems to indicate that this isn't true.

    Interesting! I have obviously never seen this. I always thought a Harvard student was given a little more freedom in GPA when applying to HLS, but perhaps I am incorrect. Thank you for the site.

    Edit: But still, the Georgetown program still serves as one example. Additionally, schools like Rice University have agreements with Columbia Law School such that students can enroll in their junior year; however, as a transfer student, I doubt one will be successful in enrolling in such programs as an undergrad.
  • mommamiamommamia Registered User Posts: 321 Member
    Harvard has big time grade inflation; H accepts a huge portion of its class from H undergrad.
  • nspedsnspeds - Posts: 5,382 Senior Member
    Harvard has big time grade inflation; H accepts a huge portion of its class from H undergrad.

    As I said in another thread:
    Grade inflation does not earn you As, it just keeps you in the high Bs. Ask any student at Harvard about how difficult it is to get an A in, say, philosophy.

    Recall that a B+ average is a 3.33, A- a 3.67, and an A is a 4.0.
  • Mr.BMr.B Registered User Posts: 1,914 Senior Member
    With the time and energy that you would be using to transfer colleges, improve your grades and class rank. Free advice from a total stranger.
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