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Harvard undergrad

supsup Registered User Posts: 1,322 Senior Member
edited January 2006 in Law School
If I went to Harvard as an undergraduate, would that in any way help (or hurt) my chances of getting into a good law school?
Post edited by sup on

Replies to: Harvard undergrad

  • scarfmadnessscarfmadness Registered User Posts: 469 Member
    i would say it would help a little bit, except that harvard is known for grade inflation, and probably lots more people from harvard apply to, say, harvard law than do people from state u.
  • kfc4ukfc4u Registered User Posts: 3,415 Senior Member
    well, harvard law does accept a lot more from harvard:

    http://www.law.harvard.edu/admissions/jd/colleges.php
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    sup,

    I'll say this as colloquially as I can...dude it's Harvard, what do you think?

    (Not particularly insightful, but you get the idea.)
  • baller4lyfeballer4lyfe Registered User Posts: 1,214 Senior Member
    unless you're a person who just wants the best, go to a law school that has an awesome surrounding city, has a good social life, majority of student body aren't dweebs/nerds, sports is active, etc. - because it can make law school much more enjoyable since it's a tedious 3 years. UCLA law school, for instance, would suffice, since it's still great and has the other opportunities to offer as well (other than just name).
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Hehe yeah, avoid those dweeb/nerds.
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    ...avoid those high salaries, too.
  • kfc4ukfc4u Registered User Posts: 3,415 Senior Member
    ...avoid those high salaries, too.

    not necessarily... the bottom of harvard law probably doesn't get $125k out of graduation, and the top chunk of UCLA law students can get $125k.
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    "not necessarily... the bottom of harvard law probably doesn't get $125k out of graduation, and the top chunk of UCLA law students can get $125k."

    And you say that presupposing that all HLS graduates are "nerds" --even the bottom half-- while the top UCLA ones are not? I don't see the foundation, nor the connection, of your comment.

    HLS graduates that do not earn high salaries are usually the ones that opt for more "rewarding" public interest law careers.

    Furthermore, the "top chunk" of most regional law schools can get 125K. However, it will be a significantly smaller number --whereas at the top LS high salaries are the norm.

    If you are indeed hoping for higher salaries, more opportunities, and more intellectual stimulation, rubbing shoulders with those so called "nerds" is almost a necessity. On the other hand, if you just want
    "A law degree" --I guess any would do.

    "because it can make law school much more enjoyable"

    I guess it is all based on perspective.

    "Hehe yeah, avoid those dweeb/nerds."

    I think not. ;)
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    But wildflower, what have those dweebs/nerds ever done for society, really?



    I hope you caught on that we agree . . .
  • WildflowerWildflower Registered User Posts: 1,254 Senior Member
    *blushes*

    by the way, do you ever sleep? :D
  • DRabDRab Registered User Posts: 6,104 Senior Member
    Eh, usually between the hours of 6 AM and 3 PM Pacific Coast Time (during breaks of course).
  • ariesathenaariesathena Registered User Posts: 5,087 Senior Member
    Don't assume that you would get better grades at a lower-ranked law school than at a higher-ranked one. Obviously, if you got into Harvard, you will probably kill the competition at New England School of Law. But up or down a few rankings, or mid-first-tier to the second tier - there's no way to tell how well you're going to grasp the law, organize yourself, etc.
  • *devo**devo* Registered User Posts: 143 Junior Member
    As far as salary is concerned... the salary for many top law graduates in the 25 to 75% is 125,000 but how much of that has to do with the city they are employed? I plan on working in Phoenix. The average salary for ASU and U of A (the only 2 law schools in AZ) is about 80,000. So, does a Harvard graduate still make 125,000 if they were to practice somewhere other than LA, NY, etc?
  • patientpatient Registered User Posts: 1,458 Member
    Here's my amateur guess at the answer, and it may spark a debate here from those with more current knowledge. (Having gone to Harvard undergrad, then Stanford Law, although many years ago, and having become a good friend of the then-admissions dean while at the law school).

    If you go to Harvard and get top grades and a top LSAT score, you will have lots of options and the fact that you were at Harvard plus doing well will be a big help.

    If you go to Harvard and get okay grades and a top LSAT score, you will still have lots of options and Harvard might give you a bump but maybe not a big one--i.e., someone from a lesser-known college with better grades and the same LSAT score might be just as prized as you are.

    If you go to Harvard and get mediocre grades and a mediocre LSAT score, the fact that it was Harvard won't help at all and it might even make the admissions committee steer away from you, because if you went to Harvard you are kind of expected to be able to excel on tests and in the classroom.
This discussion has been closed.