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3.6 engineering GPA and 175 LSAT score, what are chances at Harvard Law?

masquemasque 18 replies14 threads Junior Member
edited October 2016 in Law School
I have a 3.6 GPA in engineering and a 175 LSAT score.

Do I have a pretty decent chance at Harvard? I have heard there is a .2 GPA unofficial "curve" for engineering students but I can't be certain of course.

Also, I am graduating (obtaining my full undergraduate degree) in six semesters (3 years) and this is probably why my GPA is not a 3.9+ (something I regret doing now). How much will they care that I graduated in only 3 years? Will this provide me the extra boost for almost guaranteed admission? Or will this not even be relevant? I am told this is extremely rare, especially for an engineering major, but I'm worried it won't even be considered.

Thanks
edited October 2016
5 replies
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Replies to: 3.6 engineering GPA and 175 LSAT score, what are chances at Harvard Law?

  • bluebayoubluebayou 28255 replies213 threads Senior Member
    edited October 2016
    There is no rule about Engineers or other STEM majors. That being said, employability of law grads is a minor plus factor, and having a STEM degree enhances your employability.

    No Law school were care about early graduation. If anything, its a small negative. All professional schools prefer a year or two (or three) or work experience. It makes for better classroom and real life discussions/papers.

    Net-net, do you have a "decent chance" at HLS? Of course. But it might be a full pay. Apply broadly and compare merit offers.
    edited October 2016
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  • HappyAlumnusHappyAlumnus 1177 replies46 threads Senior Member
    I would think that you would have a good shot.

    I'm not aware of any merit aid given by HLS to anyone.
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  • Demosthenes49Demosthenes49 1622 replies4 threads Senior Member
    HLS doesn't give merit aid but it does give needs-based aid. I second @bluebayou's point about getting some work experience. Especially if you're graduating in only three years. Have you had any hands-on experience with law?
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  • HappyAlumnusHappyAlumnus 1177 replies46 threads Senior Member
    @masque, HLS has a accelerated admissions program for college juniors to be admitted to HLS. I think that it's only for Harvard College, though, and you are required as part of that process to take at least a year off to work. I went to HLS, and Dean Minow is constantly speaking about how the admissions committee has been instructed to emphasize work experience between college and HLS, so I would take at least a year or two off...then apply.
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 28255 replies213 threads Senior Member
    edited October 2016
    I'm not aware of any merit aid given by HLS to anyone.

    That is correct. None of HYS give merit aid. But that was my point: apply to some schools that do and see what they are willing to pay you to attend!
    edited October 2016
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