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UF vs Cornell for undergrad

twistatwista Registered User Posts: 108 Junior Member
edited April 2007 in Law School
Well i am a senior in high school and i have been accepted to many schools and i have narrowed it down to the University of FLorida and Cornell University. I was wondering what you guys think would be the better place to go for an undergrad degree. If i go to UF i can go for practically free and have no loans whereas if i go to Cornell i will probably accumulate a good amount of loans when i graduate. When applying to get into law school would it be better to have a higher gpa at UF or a lower gpa Cornell. ANy help is greatly appreciated.
Post edited by twista on
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Replies to: UF vs Cornell for undergrad

  • Mr PayneMr Payne Registered User Posts: 8,850 Senior Member
    UF free >>>> any school + money.
  • AmericanskiAmericanski Registered User Posts: 683 Member
    It won't make a difference for law school admissions. Just keep in mind that you'll probably rack up a lot of debt going to law school.
  • college2gocollege2go Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    An Ivy or a second tier school???. Cornell of course.
  • Student615Student615 Registered User Posts: 1,885 Senior Member
    I'm personally one who thinks that you can get comparable educations and opportunities anywhere (however, you may have to claw for them one place, while they're handed to you on a silver platter at another, which is not necessarily to say that either will be the case at UF or Cornell). Your experiences at the two schools will certainly be VERY different, though. The thing that most strikes me is that a student who can get into Cornell could also get generous scholarships to a lot of schools that might be better fits than UF, so if you go to UF and things don't work out this year, transferring could be a viable (if not preferable) option, even with financial constraints.

    Note also that the difference between how law schools will look at the two degrees is minimal (provided that you do very, very well at UF. If you do slightly less well at Cornell, you might be allowed some slide. This is just a guess, but Cornell has a well-known reputation for grade-deflation. UF, regardless of what it's policies are, might not enjoy the same benefit of the doubt). However, if you change your mind and decide against grad school, then the difference between these two degrees becomes much bigger (if only temporarily). If you want to stay in/around Florida, it won't be a big deal, but a Cornell degree will carry you farther more easily.

    That said, if you don't want debt, you're set on law school, and you think you could be HAPPY and do WELL at FU, then it seems the very obvious choice. Good luck!
  • stoneimmaculatestoneimmaculate - Posts: 619 Member
    You can probably do just as well at UF, but just know that students from Cornell, statistically, have a much better chance of getting in to top schools and most especially Ivies. This is probably due to the fact that Cornell generally has a better quality of students overall but just keep this in mind.

    You can still get into any t14 law school from UF, you will just have to find something that differentiates yourself from the candidates from higher ranked schools.
  • Mr PayneMr Payne Registered User Posts: 8,850 Senior Member
    And, of course, you will have a much higher GPA at UF than at Cornell, that's a feather in UF's cap if you want to look at it from that angle. Considering that 90% of admissions at top law schools is LSAT+GPA then that's what you need to concentrate on.
  • Student615Student615 Registered User Posts: 1,885 Senior Member
    "And, of course, you will have a much higher GPA at UF than at Cornell..."

    I know nothing about UF, but be careful of assuming that your GPA would be significantly higher there. It's not uncommon for schools with high acceptance rates to have very harsh curves and grading policies. One of the most intelligent people I know--literally, a brilliant student--has a 3.5-3.6ish at a school with a 99% acceptance rate, and she works her tail off (which is not to criticize a 3.5, but this is coming from a girl who's used to a 4.8). Not having to prove yourself so hard to get in can mean that you have to prove yourself harder once you're there, if that makes sense.

    What I intended to say in an earlier post was that Cornell is definitely known for grade deflation, but law schools will know this fact (and may or may not choose to take it into account). *Regardless* of whether or not UF also deflates or grades harshly, I doubt you'll have much chance at similar leniency. Your law school report does make some attempt to contextualize your GPA, though, so maybe it's a non-issue.

    ANYWAY, the point that I'm hiding behind way too many words is just to be wary of making the quoted assumption.
  • GatorEng23GatorEng23 Registered User Posts: 1,571 Senior Member
    An Ivy or a second tier school???. Cornell of course.

    Uh, UF is tier one (by the actual standard, not your delusional one).

    But it really doesn't matter, you can get into a top law school from virtually any school. I'd rather go to a school that's almost free and fun while getting great education. Save some money, you're going to need it. I
  • college2gocollege2go Registered User Posts: 117 Junior Member
    GatorEng23,

    By my "delusional" standards and by all rankings (USNEWS, etc) Cornell is far better than UF. HLS and YLS accepted many more students from Cornell than UF. Is that also delusional?
  • GatorEng23GatorEng23 Registered User Posts: 1,571 Senior Member
    Um, can you show me where I said that UF is better than Cornell? I was simply correcting your statement that UF is a tier 2 school.

    EDIT: And by "delusional," I meant that you are one of those kids who think tier 1 is the top 20 or so, which would explain why you label UF as Tier 2. Now that I have read a good number of your past posts, I believe that's right.
  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Registered User Posts: 11,964 Senior Member
    tier 1 is the top 20 or so

    Top 20 would already be generous according to some of the standards I see floating around these boards. Goodness, I had a kid call Duke a second-tier school a couple weeks back.
  • GatorEng23GatorEng23 Registered User Posts: 1,571 Senior Member
    Isn't it crazy? I remember one board that asked to state colleges with the best/worst names. Many people listed University of Pennsylvania as a bad name. Why? Because it sounds like a state school! lmao.
  • stoneimmaculatestoneimmaculate - Posts: 619 Member
    UF is not a bad school, no one is saying that, it's just that coming from Cornell you will have less to prove than at UF. If money is a central issue I think it would be silly to rack up massive amounts of debt when you could be going to a good school for next to nothing.
  • AmericanskiAmericanski Registered User Posts: 683 Member
    You can probably do just as well at UF, but just know that students from Cornell, statistically, have a much better chance of getting in to top schools and most especially Ivies.

    I'd love to see these statistics. Because I think all you have to go on are the absolute numbers of Cornell grads enrolled at a few law schools, which means absolutely nothing.
  • Student615Student615 Registered User Posts: 1,885 Senior Member
    "This is probably due to the fact that Cornell generally has a better quality of students overall"

    Because of the above, I wouldn't be surprised if the statistical claim were true. The average Harvard student probably has a higher chance of getting into a top law school than the average Kansas State student. Because law schools look more kindly on Harvard than on Kansas State? No idea. But the average Harvard student is probably more likely to have top grades, high LSATs, and "elite" ECs. This says nothing whatsoever about the average 3.8/175 Harvard student vs. the average 3.8/175 Kansas student. For that matter, hey, the latter offers geographic diversity!

    I've seen the many, many, many "Ivies send more students to top law schools" threads here, and all of the debates on what this means and doesn't mean, so I'm not trying to start that again here. Just noting that the quoted poster did say a little more, although perhaps not enough to really clarify his claim.
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