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Getting ADHD medication at college

NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
How does your child get their medication at college? Right now my son has biweekly counseling with a psychologist, and sees a psychiatrist every 3 months to manage his adhd medication. Once he goes to college, can this be handled through the school? He takes a stimulant which is regulated and has to be prescribed monthly. I am wondering what parents experiences are with this?
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Replies to: Getting ADHD medication at college

  • MACmiracleMACmiracle Registered User Posts: 893 Member
    We never did ADHD meds while away but I have experience with them, as well as a kid away who required other medication.

    Some psychiatrists will provide multiple scripts dated a month a part, not a lot but two or three, as long as the relationship is established and they believe the patient is safe with that, like a parent is helping manage it.

    Some will also mail out scripts on a monthly basis with a check-in of some kind.

    They might want to know counseling is continuing at the college and have you sign a release of medical information between counselor and medication prescriber.

    In either case, if you decide to keep the provider at home, it's a good idea to schedule appointments far ahead of time for breaks.
  • MassDaD68MassDaD68 Registered User Posts: 1,321 Senior Member
    The best way is just to have the meds sent to a local pharmacy near the college. He can then pick them up when he needs them.

    I doubt the college would get involved.
  • NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
    Thanks. At one point I thought since they have medical services and counseling services at college, that my son would have a therapist there, and be prescribed his medication there. Was I naive? What about therapy on a regular basis- is that provided for students at college or is counseling more for acute situations? Also, my original post is confusing. My son has counseling every other week, not twice a week.
  • NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
    Thanks. At one point I thought since they have medical services and counseling services at college, that my son would have a therapist there, and be prescribed his medication there. Was I naive? What about therapy on a regular basis- is that provided for students at college or is counseling more for acute situations? Also, my original post is confusing. My son has counseling every other week, not twice a week.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 52,143 Senior Member
    Class II drugs like ritalin cannot be called into a pharmacy, but if , as described above, your child's psychiatrist is willing to write post-dated prescriptions for a month at a time your child can then go to a local pharmacy and fill them. Or you can keep the scripts and ship the meds. Pugh them in a package with some other goodies for your kiddo. I have heard a few cases where someone had a problem with shipping a class II drug, even though it was a prescription.
  • surfcitysurfcity Registered User Posts: 1,935 Senior Member
    Our doctor can send an electronic script to a pharmacy so that's what we plan to do. He could also mail a paper one to my student.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 52,143 Senior Member
    edited July 16
    @surfcity- In the past, class II drugs could not be sent that way. This looks like DEA modified its rules to allow it, but it look like the pharmacy isn't required to accept it, so check, just in case https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/ecomm/e_rx/faq/faq.htm
  • NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
    Yes, I don't think we can even get paper scripts in New York anymore, but the psychiatrist could either send in an electric one for my son, or I could send him a care package-both good suggestions. But having his care transferred to a psychiatrist at the school is not realistic I guess? In my mind I thought this was the perfect solution both in terms of convenience and cost. What about therapy? What can I expect a college to provide? Thanks for the replies.
  • MACmiracleMACmiracle Registered User Posts: 893 Member
    @surfcity I thought meds like that require a paper script. Or are those state specific regulations?

    @NYmommabear Call and check on the specifics of the counseling options at the college because they vary. My D had great counseling services (better than medical) but I was surprised to learn some colleges limit the number of sessions and/or charge.

    You can also check about providers who can prescribe at the college or locally. Disability services would probably be able to make suggestions.

    Some doctors might be concerned about prescribing to a new patient because these types of meds can be abused, and are on college campuses.

    You might want to get started way ahead of time because it might take awhile to get an appointment and you might want to be prepared with a letter from the current prescribing doc, copies of records, etc.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 52,143 Senior Member
    You can look into getting a local psychiatrist, but only a few schools have psychiatrists on staff in their health center. Some may have a relationship with a part time local doc.
  • NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
    Thank you!
  • MaystarmomMaystarmom Registered User Posts: 211 Junior Member
    edited July 16
    Neice uses 90-day prescription for ADHD med Ritalin. 90-days can only be done through mail-in pharmacy through her insurance--it has worked this way for Cigna, United Health and Aetna insurance.

    Her mom mails in the prescription for her 4 weeks early. They will fill mail order scripts earlier than walk-in pharmacy and if u stay on strict schedule u can get ahead on supply--pills arrive in 10-14 days

    First time they did this they had both a 30-day script to fill locally and a 90-day one to mail away.

    In most cases my Neice still has pills delivering to home address because it works out that she's home often enough to give them to her. One time they did have them sent to her dorm freshman year because her parents were traveling.

    I know the Dr can electronically submit a 90-day prescription directly to the mail-in pharmacy, but don't know regulations on controlled substances.



  • MaystarmomMaystarmom Registered User Posts: 211 Junior Member
    edited July 16
    My neice has used the same child psychiatrist for meds since she was 6, she still sees him when she is home on breaks, so no new med dr was set up at her school.

    I would think for therapy u would locate a private therapist in the area of the school.

    My neice is in the SALT program at U of A and they offer therapy as part of the program, but even then, I'm not sure if it is long-term counseling or more immediate intervention until a more permanent set-up can be established. They have a pretty good website; the program is an additional cost over tuition.
  • NYmommabearNYmommabear Registered User Posts: 146 Junior Member
    I just looked up info on the e-prescription law in New York. They eliminated paper prescriptions for controlled substances in 2016 to try to curb illegal distribution. I would rather have a paper prescription in hand because sometimes my pharmacy is out of the medication I need, and then I'm stuck. The law limits your ability to shop around as a consumer, but that is a minor inconvenience compared to the bigger cause.
  • surfcitysurfcity Registered User Posts: 1,935 Senior Member
    The electronic script is newer, at least for my MD. But it is convenient. Unless the pharmacy is out of the med. You'd think that if one CVS was out they could transfer the Rx to another location but they cannot for some reason. I also can't call the other location first to see if it's in stock. I don't know if that's a CVS reg or government.

    To the OP, many college counseling services are designed for short term crisis situations imho. They would ask you to find a local provider for ongoing therapy.
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