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My DS'18 has night time enuresis. Shall I disclose that in Parents' Reflection Sheet for GC?

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Replies to: My DS'18 has night time enuresis. Shall I disclose that in Parents' Reflection Sheet for GC?

  • SybyllaSybylla Registered User Posts: 1,458 Senior Member
    Well, a neuro and endo consults would have been appropriate well before now. And whoever manages his ADHD, is that a psych, they should be part of the picture. How long since his last big workup even within your current management plan? When does he turn 18?
  • finallyastudentfinallyastudent Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    I would never disclose something personal like that unless he lets it be known. Are K12 GCs and colleges really faulting students for not having overnight extracurriculars? I certainly hope not.

    I don't see what bedwetting really has to do with a school calling him lazy. Does he not participate in class, skip class, get bad grades? If they're calling him lazy because he doesn't go to overnight camp somewhere, the GC really is over the top and unprofessional.
  • Truro13Truro13 Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    I was a bed wetter my whole life until I arrived at college. It never happened again! A different environment and new start can help!!
  • techmom99techmom99 Registered User Posts: 1,814 Senior Member
    One of my sons suffered from enuresis until he was almost 18. We visited urologists, he was under the care of a neuro doc for his inattentive ADD and sequellae from lead poisoning, we tried biofeedback, which was great for the attention span but did nothing for the wetting, bed alarms, walking him at night before we went to bed. We used DDAVP and it helped for awhile. When he got older, we got it in pill form and after trying it out for a couple of weeks, we felt safe enough to let him do overnights on it. We started with his grandmother, then a couple of trusted friends who would give him the pill, then when he was about 12, we would give him the pill himself and call him to remind him to take it. He never forgot because he didn't want anyone to know. Eventually, it tapered down and soon it was stopped. When he hadn't wet for three months, we bought him a new mattress.

    For your son, I would second a private room and I would get a rubber mattress cover and encourage him to wash his sheets frequently.

    Good luck, I understand how devastating this issue can be.
  • LeastComplicatedLeastComplicated Registered User Posts: 572 Member
    What @techmom99 ^said. I think that there are a lot more adults that have this condition than people realize. I imagine colleges have dealt with it before. Contact the school's disability/access services office and present the problem to them with documentation along with the fact that it is associated with ADHD. I would imagine they would be required to keep this info confidential and would provide them an accommodation of a single room and then other accommodations for the ADHD if necessary. This would also allow him special accommodations for any required overnight field trips that might be required in his field of study (I had a couple of required overnight field trips and an 8 week "summer camp" (8 credits of classes that had to be completed in an outdoor environment and the students stayed in multi-person cabins).

    And no, do not disclose the condition to the guidance counselor, address it on the Common App, or discuss it with anyone other than the disability services office. It is no one's business, especially the admissions staff, and it has nothing to do with his EC's.

    You've stated that your son would be upset if you disclosed this to the school, but how does he expect to deal with the situation unless you do? The only way I can think of him going to college without having to disclose the info is if he commuted, got off campus housing with his own room, or he applied to schools where students are able to get single rooms for an additional fee and that enough single rooms are available to everyone who requests one. I would think those colleges would be rare, but maybe you could do some research to see if there are any that are a good fit for him and your family.

    Good luck.
  • LeastComplicatedLeastComplicated Registered User Posts: 572 Member
    What @techmom99 ^said. I think that there are a lot more adults that have this condition than people realize. I imagine colleges have dealt with it before. Contact the school's disability/access services office and present the problem to them with documentation along with the fact that it is associated with ADHD. I would imagine they would be required to keep this info confidential and would provide them an accommodation of a single room and then other accommodations for the ADHD if necessary. This would also allow him special accommodations for any required overnight field trips that might be required in his field of study (I had a couple of required overnight field trips and an 8 week "summer camp" (8 credits of classes that had to be completed in an outdoor environment and the students stayed in multi-person cabins).

    And no, do not disclose the condition to the guidance counselor, address it on the Common App, or discuss it with anyone other than the disability services office. It is no one's business and it has nothing to do with his EC's.

    You've stated that your son would be upset if you disclosed this to the school, but how does he expect to deal with the situation unless you do? The only way I can think of him going to college without having to disclose the info is if he commuted, got off campus housing with his own room, or he applied to schools where students are able to get single rooms for an additional fee and that enough single rooms are available to everyone who requests one. I would think those colleges would be rare, but maybe you could do some research to see if there are any that are a good fit for him and your family.

    Good luck.
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