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How to begin LSAT prep?

BurgerMan1BurgerMan1 Registered User Posts: 330 Member
What is the best way to begin LSAT self-study prep? I see a lot of expensive books and programs, but I do not have the spending money to splurge on all of them without knowing what I am getting into.

Replies to: How to begin LSAT prep?

  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 389 Member
    Check your local library.
  • BrooklynRyeBrooklynRye Registered User Posts: 345 Member
    I would expect this thread to get more traffic considering the importance of your question. I too am researching LSAT prep and having a similar experience. Without looking into anyone else's wallet, it would seem that some formal prep is advisable. How much is another question. I have heard that the new LSAT is a test that can be largely mastered by repeatedly taking simulated tests. Of course this may not work for all students. So I too am looking for recommendations on courses of study and strategies in preparing for this critical test.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 24,468 Senior Member
    depends on the score that you are aiming for. If a mid-160's, then any Kaplan or Princeton Review will do nicely. But for a 17x, I recommend Manhattan. To save money just take their online course. (You have to do all the study work yourself, anyway.)

    Also, recommend taking LSAT after graduation: 1) get more A's senior year; 2) gap year means that you can obtain a year's worth of work experience; 3) more time to prep since not competing with coursework.
  • BurgerMan1BurgerMan1 Registered User Posts: 330 Member
    @bluebayou Wouldn't one have to begin repaying student loans immediately after graduation?
  • BrooklynRyeBrooklynRye Registered User Posts: 345 Member
    @bluebayou - This is a very useful response. Thank you! Have begun researching Manhattan. Do you know anything about or have any experience with TestMasters?

    I agree that there are students better served with a gap year. From my experience, these fall into four categories: (i) can't afford it; (ii) uncertain about law school; (iii) need something to offset sub par grades, (iv) and/or simply need a break psychologically and/or to do something meaningful before starting grad school.

    My D1 falls into none of these categories. My main question for her re the LSAT is the time and concentration needed to ace the the test.

    Good leads -- Thank you!
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 24,468 Senior Member
    Wouldn't one have to begin repaying student loans immediately after graduation?

    Isn't there a 9 month grace period following graduation from undergrad before the 1st payment is due? Plus, the feds offer several income-based repayment plans.
    From my experience, these fall into four categories:...

    There is a 5th: all professional schools prefer (real life) work experience. And a 6th: waiting until after graduation gives an applicant a LOT more time to prep for the LSAT. A 17x can mean thousands of tax free dollars in merit money. It will be the easiest money that a young 'en will earn in their lifetime (absent winning a lottery).

    As for study, mosey on over to Top Law Schools. Plenty of good reading there. WRT strategies: it depends more on the student: a) some do better in a group/class setting; b) others can study online/at home. (Personally, since the student has to do all of the work anyway, I gravitate towards b.)

    Timing of the test is not as important as timing of applications. With the same two umbers, early (late Sept/early Oct) is better. But definitely worth waiting until Jan if an October test date would result in a higher score. Even a couple of points can be critical.
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