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Will I be able to get into McGill with this GPA?

newbie3000newbie3000 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
edited June 2011 in McGill University
Hey guys, I just finished my first year of university and I have a 3.7 gpa (A-) Average. Will I be able to transfer to McGill with that gpa? My school uses a 4.3 gpa scale so I have a 3.7/4.3, nevertheless, it's still a (A-) average and I would think that it would be a 3.7/4 for McGill as well as most of the teachers at my university don't even count A+(4.3) as a real grade... Thanks for your responses and insight.
Post edited by newbie3000 on
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Replies to: Will I be able to get into McGill with this GPA?

  • newbie3000newbie3000 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    44 views and no responses.? Somebody must know something, even if they are sure that what they are saying is 100% truth, someone must have an idea... I just want some input so I have idea of how everything will play out.
  • tomofbostontomofboston Registered User Posts: 2,373 Senior Member
    I'd say most likely but not much info available re: transfer admissions.
  • newbie3000newbie3000 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    Some insight from others would be nice as well.
  • newbie3000newbie3000 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    I did my homework and it turns out a 3.7 at my University if after all a 3.7 at McGill. Does anyone know if a 3.7 is good enough to be accepted as a transfer student to McGill?
  • newbie3000newbie3000 Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    Anybody can answer I'm desperate, I called McGill and they said that you need a 3.0 (B average) and up but the amount of transfer student that are actually offered admission is around 36% meaning the bar must be set higher... McGill admission office is no help.... :(
  • arsenaleungarsenaleung Registered User Posts: 28 New Member
    Let me chime in and be the bad guy.

    Reasons why so few people provide you information:

    1) You aren't providing enough information
    If you are from Harvard with a GPA 3.0, I think they will admit you.

    2) Transfer has no set rules, it's mostly reviewed on a case-by-case basis.

    Even admission officers cannot tell your chance, not that they are not willing to, but that they are not able to. The transfer thing depends on not only your grade, but also your competitors of the year, who are very likely not the most orthodox students out on the street.

    The criteria adopted by McGill are mainly just grades, unlike those US schools which consider a lot more factors in a holistic fashion. If you are not from a decent school, then get as high a GPA as you can.

    Just apply, you have nothing to lose.
  • prodiddlerprodiddler Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    Holy hell, how have I not seen this post before? I'm always looking for more info about transferring to McGill!

    From what I've seen, a 3.7 should get you in!

    But like stated before, transferring is screwy, and there are no guarantees!

    The only original piece of information is I have is that last year I got waitlisted with a 3.4 on a 4.0 scale (U of MN).

    This year I was at Concordia, and got a 3.8, so hopefully I'll be at McGill in the fall!

    Good luck!
  • LazyleeLazylee Registered User Posts: 19 New Member
    You should be in good standing for transfer, but there are no guarantees. In my opinion you have to contact the admission office directly at this point because you DO stand a chance, a great one I would say. Those suggestions offered by ppl on any forum possess no authority cuz nobody ever touched base with the counsellors at Mcgill themselves(Not to mention the Mcgill website says nothing about transfer students). Anyways, just call them and don't forget to state where your previous school was...just a reminder...


    Like honestly, don't stop trying until Mcgill tells you otherwise:)
  • violindadviolindad Registered User Posts: 933 Member
    I suspect that the reason that there is little information on transfer requirements and that transfers are case-by-case is that there is huge variation in marking standards amongst colleges and thus McGill might consider what college a GPA has been earned at. (Yes, there is huge variation in marking standards among high schools, but there are far too many high schools to get data from; the colleges tend to vary their marking standards in more predictable ways).

    My guess is that a 3.7 transfer applicant from Princeton probably usually gains admission, but a 3.7 transfer applicant from a community college whose past transfers have all failed miserably after entering McGill probably doesn not gain admission. Not all 3.7's are created equal.
  • Nicole1029Nicole1029 Registered User Posts: 24 New Member
    At Violindad:
    It's a shame, isn't it? A degree from an Ivy or other top tier school will get you far, as will applying transfer from the same schools. However, there is a TON of grade inflation going on in the top schools of the US. A 3.0 at McGill would likely be a 4.0 at Princeton, where as a 3.0 at Princeton would probably only be a 2.0ish at McGill.
    Certainly a 3.7 at any 4 year college should gain admission to McGill, but not all do. Sometimes the name matters, and that's a shame.
  • l0rdiel0rdie Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    I feel the need to interject here.

    Firstly Nicole, you and violindad are arguing two entirely different things. While he is simply discussing the fact that a 3.7 GPA can mean very different things depending on the rigor and reputation of a school, you on the other-hand are criticizing the current state of grading among top/prestigious schools.

    While I, as well as most, agree with violindad, I take some issue with your post, Nicole.

    Firstly, Princeton is actually notorious for grade DEflation. And top schools by no means have a reputation of fluffing up their students' grades. These schools attract some of the best and brightest in academia, and make their respective curricula appropriately difficult.

    Hell, last time I checked, whenever someone finished Harvard college with a 4.0, it literally made national news.

    So no Nicole, it's not a shame. While I do agree that some schools do unfairly inflate GPAs, Princeton and suchlike definitely do not.

    A 3.7 from Princeton is quite impressive, and blindly wanting to reform Princeton's grading system (for some uninformed, emotional reason) is downright disrespectful.
  • algiemomalgiemom Registered User Posts: 9 New Member
    l0rdie, when is the last time you checked? I don't know about Princeton, but Harvard is notorious for grade inflation. It has been investigated and written about it for years.

    The Boston Globe Online / Harvard's honors system
    USATODAY.com - Ivy League grade inflation
  • Nicole1029Nicole1029 Registered User Posts: 24 New Member
    Which is precisely why I wrote that post. There have been many investigations and articles about grade inflation in all colleges/universities, but most notably the ivies/their equals. There is also common knowledge that acceptance/attendance at those schools will 'broaden your horizons' so to say, regardless of what degree you got from them. Grade inflation is a huge problem in the US, it's part of the reason why high schools have different GPA scales.
    Suffice it to say, GPA only matters when applying to college. Whether it be from high school or transfer or graduate school, that's pretty much the only time it'll matter. An employer is likely to hire someone with an ivy degree over someone with a non ivy degree, but it wouldn't matter whether the applicant had a 3.0 or 3.7, or even a 4.0.
  • l0rdiel0rdie Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    Let's simplify this, Nicole.

    Your argument is that it's a shame that 3.7s at all 4 year colleges don't count equally: "Certainly a 3.7 at any 4 year college should gain admission to McGill, but not all do"

    My argument is that I find that rediculous because many 4 year universities have curricula that are multitudes more rigorous/difficult than others.

    The end. I think that sufficiently shows in transparency how ill-thought and emotionally-based your argument is.
  • Stephe14Stephe14 Registered User Posts: 14 New Member
    I don't know if you will get into McGill as a transfer student with a 3.7 / 4.3 it depends which university you are transferring from because I'm trying to transfer from unb with a 4.1 / 4.3 gpa and I'm worry not to get in !!
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