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How much do McGill graduates earn?

upapilotupapilot Registered User Posts: 178 Junior Member
edited August 2014 in McGill University
Hello!

I'm an Indian student starting undergraduate studies at McGill this Fall. I was wondering if any McGill alumni out could tell me how much a fresh graduate from the university would earn from his first job.

If I did a double Honours in Economics and Mathematics, what kind of job would I get and how much would it approximately pay? What are the prospects for finding a job outside of Canada (like in the US or the UK)?

Replies to: How much do McGill graduates earn?

  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    What are the prospects for finding a job outside of Canada (like in the US or the UK)

    You would need a work visa. To get a work visa, an employer has to demonstrate that a citizen or PR with those skills is not available to hire in the country. It would be almost impossible to get a work visa fresh out of college w only a bachelors degree, w/o years of work experience. Many countries have a 10 year work experience minimum or a graduate degree requirement.
  • Zilch3Zilch3 Registered User Posts: 58 Junior Member
    edited August 2014
    Like the above poster mentioned forget about working in the U.S or UK with a bachelors. It's just not going to happen.

    As for your prospects, you probably already know this but it matters less about what you study and more about who you know/networking opportunities.

    The business school majors traditionally have pretty good career fairs and professors who can help students with some opportunities.

    Arts however is quite terrible in that regard. You'd probably end up with a higher paying job as a business/commerce major given the networking opportunities alone.

    People who do the Honours Econ/Math stream are more interested in graduate study in economics or math, like a PhD. They are not really looking for a job.
  • upapilotupapilot Registered User Posts: 178 Junior Member
    @Zilch3‌ @GMTplus7‌ Hmm.. Interesting. McGill also offers a Joint Honours Economics and Finance, with the finance component being offered by the Desautels Faculty of Management. Would I have better job prospects if I did that instead of the Math/Eco program ?
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    read post #1 again
  • Zilch3Zilch3 Registered User Posts: 58 Junior Member
    edited August 2014
    Your GPA would definitely be higher with the Econ/Finance route. At the end of the day business firms really only care about your GPA, interview skills and work experience (if any). They usually train and teach you everything once you join so what you actually learn at university plays little to no part.

    That being said if your plan is just to get a job then the Econ/Finance route would be the better choice. A friend of mine got a really high paying job because a finance professor set him up for an interview with a friend who was hiring for his firm.

    Interacting and getting to know your finance profs would open more doors for you then anything else. Most of them have years of experience in the private sector and can guide you pretty well if you ask for it.
  • usert123usert123 Registered User Posts: 31 Junior Member
    edited October 2014
    Your post is not completely accurate.

    New study permits issued for international students now automatically come with work authorization for 20 hours a week during the school year and 40 hours a week during breaks while enrolled as a student.

    After graduating from a Canadian university, you're eligible for a Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWPP) which gives 3 years of unlimited work authorization following your graduation (which should be enough time to qualify for permanent residency if you wish to continue to stay and work in Canada).
  • raag25raag25 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    Hey I'm an indian student planning to start at McGill this fall. What is your opinion of the university? I want to do economics too.
  • sleepeatstudysleepeatstudy Registered User Posts: 23 Junior Member
    Your GPA would definitely be higher with the Econ/Finance route. At the end of the day business firms really only care about your GPA, interview skills and work experience (if any). They usually train and teach you everything once you join so what you actually learn at university plays little to no part.
    I'd disagree - employers in my experience and my prof has told me as well, don't ask for GPAs. They're primarily used for grad school but very rarely (if at all) in interviews.

    I agree with the notion of "who you know not what you know" and agree that making friends with your profs can give you good connections. As well, do an internship because that will give you tangible experience and connections into a job afterwards.
  • usert123usert123 Registered User Posts: 31 Junior Member
    edited June 2015
    I'd disagree - employers in my experience and my prof has told me as well, don't ask for GPAs. They're primarily used for grad school but very rarely (if at all) in interviews.

    From my experience going through recruiting, that is absolutely not true. For entry level jobs, GPA is incredibly important for business related fields

    I don't know what fields you're looking at, but generally for the most coveted positions in business (investment banking or consulting), GPA is used a resume screen and generally if you have a sub 3.6/3.7, you're probably not even going to get a 1st round interview. Even for less coveted positions, GPA is still incredibly important and you'll see for many/most internship applications that they have 3.0 or 3.5 GPA minimums.

    You're expected to have your GPA on your resume, and leaving it off is usually a big red flag to HR.
This discussion has been closed.