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General Advice on Interviews.

PSedrishMDPSedrishMD 601 replies111 threadsRegistered User Member
edited October 2010 in Med School Interviews
About the interview: it may be very hard for "pre-med types" to face a challenge like the interview without a script to study, but alas, there is no script. The purpose of the interview is not to test your knowledge, but rather to assess intangibles such as character and dedication. Most interviewers will keep the tone very friendly and low key, asking open ended questions that will allow you to expound about yourself at will. These folks are bright people and they have seen lots of applicants, so you're not going to fool them. Be well dressed and groomed, relaxed, polite, relatively humble and very honest. Make good eye contact. Stay on point when you're asked a question and try not to ramble. Don't challenge your interviewer with a question for each question they ask you; this sometimes occurs when applicants have been told by someone outside the process that they are there as much to interview the school as to have the school interview them.... that just isn't so.
You will of course be given an opportunity to ask any questions you might have before the interview ends. In general, a comment such as "I don't have any questions at this time but from what I've seen, heard and read, I would really like to come here for Medical School" is worth more than most any question you might ask. Good luck!
edited October 2010
33 replies
Post edited by PSedrishMD on
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Replies to: General Advice on Interviews.

  • staticsoliloquystaticsoliloquy 1446 replies50 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    what are some of the questions they might ask?
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  • chicabonita2654chicabonita2654 39 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    DO they ask any political questions? or ethical questions?
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  • collegefreak77collegefreak77 91 replies16 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    i'm wondering the same thing..

    do they really ask about HMO's, malpractice, abortion and such things? it doesn't seem quite appropriate for a college interview but then again who knows

    anyone? (especially for boston...my interview's VERY soon)

    also...not to steal anyone's ideas...but what original things can u say for why u want to go into medicine?...havent they heard it all?...i'm sure they dont want to hear "i wanna help people" over and over again

    confused and worried :(
    please help..thanks
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  • mail4nrsmail4nrs 121 replies30 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    collegefreak,
    I am telling you my son's experience with RPI/AMC. I have one son already in the RPI program and other one is a sr. in High school right now and had interview with RPI last week. Albany Medical strees more on Ethical questions such as abortion, etihcal issues with stem cell research. They also askd about HMO.
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  • meds2008meds2008 4 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    examples of question types and answers can be found at www.futuredoctor.net. There used to be a website called www.interviewfeedback.com which had lists of all US and Canadian med schools and updated questions asked but now I think it was moved to the Student Doctor Network. I used to see interview questions on www.mcat-prep.com but it looks like they closed the discussion board.
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  • windycitywindycity 10 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    But the political might be more true of my friends who listed political organizations (antiwar, etc) on their resumes. None of this hurt them, they still got into great schools - UPenn, NYU, Yale.
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  • sergio1337sergio1337 200 replies3 threads. Junior Member
    u got any information on RICE/Baylor and the questions they ask?
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  • fenca786fenca786 67 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    i have an interview for the siena/amc program ..i was wondering teh type of questions they might ask....anyone knnow?
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  • sergio1337sergio1337 200 replies3 threads. Junior Member
    it seems to me that nobody knows and that everybody just wants info
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  • crnarybypass007crnarybypass007 36 replies1 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    haha right on, and im here to continue with our pathetic attempt to get ourselves into medical programs: my interview for union/AMC is MONDAY. kinda crappin my pants right now. does anyone know questions tht AMC would ask? some help would be much appreciated.
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  • sergio1337sergio1337 200 replies3 threads. Junior Member
    why were some of out posts deleted? thats bs
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  • foodisgoodfoodisgood 818 replies56 threadsRegistered User Member
    sergio, there was a server problem and they had to track back the entire server to a few days ago so all the recent posts got deleted.
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  • sergio1337sergio1337 200 replies3 threads. Junior Member
    oh ok...i was thinink they just got bored and decided to delete posts for no reason. ic
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  • MedRomanianMedRomanian 65 replies10 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    http://www.studentdoctor.net/index.asp

    go to Medical School Interview Feedback
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  • Aspen DAspen D 1444 replies41 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    what type of HMO questiosn do they ask?
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  • celestial605celestial605 1067 replies20 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Maybe some of you can give me feedback on this.

    On studentdoctor.net, I've seen quite a few people who reported being asked about the biggest hardship in their life. I have been quite privileged; my parents have always been supportive, I have done well academically and socially, and I am not disadvantaged. The honest answer to the question is that my parents disapprove of my choice for a fiance, and this is something difficult that I am still dealing with today.

    Do you think that it is appropriate to give this honest answer? I suppose I could discuss how it has affected my priorities in life and the way I view who I am. Or, should I discuss a much less severe "hardship" (such as being teased in class or something)?
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  • BigredmedBigredmed 3726 replies26 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    It is always appropriate to give an honest answer

    Even for this question, stay honest, so long as you come off as very humble in answering the question. Continually say that you've been lucky or blessed to have a fairly comfortable life, that you're parents had worked very hard to give you the opportunities that you had received and that you recognize that there support has been very vital to you, and you know that you've received advantages that other individuals have not, and you are well aware of that. From there a seque into how if you had to pick something that has been very difficult for you recently is your fiancee situation. Explain about how you have dealt with this and how you hope to resolve it, and then close with a statement about how you realize that your situation is somewhat trivial compared to those encountered by others.

    You really can't fight your own past, and if they hold the fact that your parents were successful against you, I'm not sure what you can really do in such a scenario.
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  • celestial605celestial605 1067 replies20 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Thanks - I appreciate that advice. Sounds like a good idea.
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  • AadamhAadamh 1 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Hey ppl, just asking as a general question (and not really realted to this topic- interviews,) but ppl when study really hard in medical school and become a doctor, does anyone think that they may not be able to apply all the scientific knowledge learnt, under pressure in a life-critical moment. what do the other people think? I'm particularly interested in hearing from juniour doctors, who have already graduated from medical school.

    Thanks.


    P.S Im a student from the UK, and 16 years old thinking about becomign a doctor.
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  • BigredmedBigredmed 3726 replies26 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'm a medical student and haven't had to deal with that yet. But here's what I can tell you from what I've heard and seen.

    1) Despite what you see on TV - most problems are really common and happen very regularly. A person comes in with what you think may be a heart attack, you get an EKG look for the ST segment to be elevated or not then follow the established guidelines. Or if a patient comes in with anaphylactic shock (ie from a bee sting) the appropriate treatment is taught even to first year medical students (administration of epinephrine/adrenaline). But again, the most critically important problems have very standardized guidelines that work the overwhelming majority of patients.

    2) Even the most critically ill patients aren't going to die in a split second. I think there is always time to take a moment to think. There are always things you can do to extend life, and even you as a 16 year old can probably think of them: keep them oxygenated, keep the blood flowing, stop the bleeding. This is the basis of the ABC's they teach in Basic Life Support - Airway, Breathing, Circulation. Everything is aimed at keeping tissues with enough oxygen. My Cardiology professor is fond of saying "time is tissue" and while he's speaking directly to the heart during an infarct, it applies to everything else as well.

    3) In the US third and fourth year medical students are always paired with residents (Junior Doctors as you call them), and work under the direction and guidance of either an even older resident or a fully licensed doctor (known as an Attending). There is a lot of back up to make sure treatment is given while individuals are still learning.

    4) The residency system in the US is set up to give specific experiences to new MD's that are appropriate to their chosen specialty. Residencies in the US are 3-7 years in length and from that a resident ends up seeing the majority of common problems and how to deal with them frequently. My friends that are third and fourth year students commonly complain that they have a hard time keeping their drugs and therapies straight b/c they just learned them and the residents always know, and it frustrates many students. However when you realize that the residents have spent 1-3 years only working on those types of problems every day, they get familiar with the drugs and treatments they are using all the time. And that's the key - building that database of experiences and just being used to dealing with those problems on an everyday basis.

    5) Many of the other very common problems that are life threatening happen over a more extended period of time. Appendicitis if left alone can cause death but there's usually plenty of signs and symptoms that cause people to seek medical attention. That's not to say that things cannot deteriorate rapidly in many other disease processes, but the things that triggered them were likely chronic in nature and so there is a lot of things you can do before they get to the point they will start deteriorating.
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