Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
Please take a moment to read our updated TOS, Privacy Policy, and Forum Rules.

"hold' status

13»

Replies to: "hold' status

  • jetjanjetjan Registered User Posts: 4 New Member
    Yes, we got the remedial paperwork, so I researched the DoDMERB website and got the impression that he would automatically be DQ'd. We wanted to get a jump start on the waiver process although I guess he can't start it yet as he hasn't been DQ'd yet. He wears rx orthodics at all times and his podiatrist stated in his medical record that he has normal range of motion, no pain, etc. He just mailed the remedial paperwork in this week.

    tmr did your son need to go through the waiver process?

    Thank you all for your advice and new forums for us to explore!
  • kathynpkathynp Registered User Posts: 229 Junior Member
    JetJan--

    They DQ EVERYTHING! Then it is up to you to get a written opinion from YOUR doctor who treated him AND send that to DODMERB.

    Let me explain "medical clearance", cause it seems that some of you are unclear.

    DODMERB is an independant, impartial group of military medical officers and enlisted individuals who review medical records according to a written protocol and approve or deny medical clearance. What that means is that this is not their opinion--it is based on a protocol.

    For instance, if your kid had a closed head injury within the last year, and that was on the protocol list, you would be DQ'd. Then you would get your kid's information from your doc and send it in to DODMERB. The physician board would review it and then you would get your decision. Some suggestions for the contents of that letter. Very short, non-descriptive, "the coast is clear" letters do NOT go over well. Have the doctor be specific. Dates, times, etc. Make suggestions for the letter to your doctor, in case he doesn't remember all the details.

    Jetjan, sounds like you are off to a good start, but what I would also do is, take it one step further. Number one the doctor says he's fine. Great. Does he play a varsity sport? Have the coach write a letter. You as a parent, write a letter from your prospective. The more positive information you can throw at them the better. Make sure someone says he CAN run if he can, because they do alot of it at KP.

    My kid was DQ'd more than twice before he got through. Once for eyesight and another for a closed head injury. The eyesight was easy--either he is corrected to 20/20 or not. (Make sure he brings the corrective lenses he is wearing presently. Mine was told to keep contact lenses out for three days prior to the test (I think that is the standard.) He wears only contacts, so his glasses were old and didn't correct him all the way, that's why failed. The office never told him to bring his contacts--they assumed his glasses were up to date.)The closed head injury was more challenging. He WAS temporarily impaired from the injury for a coule months, went to a concussion clinic here in DC, treatment is rest, so I had to go into a great amount of detail about how I thought he was better, i.e., he was discharged from the concussion clinic, he took 3 Advanced Placement tests and passed all of them, he participated in a comedy show and a dance recital, he worked as a mechanic twenty hours a week and maintained a 3.8 GPA. Football was over and he had to drop out of wrestling, because it was the acute phase.(This is the kind of stuff I'm talking about.) BE SPECIFIC and do NOT try to hide anything! At the end of my letter about his head, I think I said, something like, "I'm his mother, if I thought he needed more care or wasn't getting better, I would have taken him in to see a doctor. I believe he is fine now."

    I just wanted you to know what the procedure was, so you would understand that the folks at DODMERB are not these mean people who are sitting in Colorado Springs with giant red pens waiting to DQ people for the hell of it! They are following a very specific list of protocols for these kids. This is a physically tough and mentally challenging program at KP, those who are not up to it physically or mentally should NOT be in! That's the whole point.

    Good Luck!

    Good Luck--if you need anymore advise let me know.
  • tmrtmr Registered User Posts: 132 Junior Member
    Jetlan - if your S has not been DQ'd then have your podiatrist simply write a letter to DODMERB with the facts. That is all we did - the podiatrist mentioned the reason was for comfort while playing varsity sports, the rest was medical technical jargon. After that he was cleared for that remedial - no DQ and no waiver necessary.

    Again, post on the service academy forums and ask RetNavyHM - he will give you great advice on these issues.
  • mcrobbiejmcrobbiej Registered User Posts: 17 New Member
    Does anybody know the name of the book that the plebes are always reading from? How do you get a copy of it?
  • jetjanjetjan Registered User Posts: 4 New Member
    Thanks to everyone for all your advice...my son's status on DoDMERB just changed to Qualified...so he won't have to go through the waiver process after all.

    mcrobbiej - I think the book you're referring to is "In Peace and War A History of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point" by Cruikshank and Kline. My son ordered it online at Amazon.com. It has been very informative in helping him make his decision to attend USMMA.
  • suzannegrasuzannegra Registered User Posts: 1,016 Senior Member
    JetJan he's referring to the Bearings Book, which is a little book that all the Plebes have to memorize. The book is issued at Indoc to each Plebe Candidate.

    CONGRATS to your son. DoDmerb can be very difficult sometimes, but unless it is a major health issue you can usually get through it. Has he received his appointment yet?
13»
This discussion has been closed.