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Middlebury 2024 acceptance rate sees uptick to 24%

mominwashingtonmominwashington 20 replies3 threads Junior Member
edited August 10 in Middlebury College
Acceptance rate sees uptick to 24% from last year's 16% per Middlebury's newspaper:

https://middleburycampus.com/49432/news/acceptance-rate-sees-uptick-to-24-amid-covid-19-uncertainties/
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edited August 10
27 replies
Post edited by CCAdmin_Vic on
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Replies to: Middlebury 2024 acceptance rate sees uptick to 24%

  • Unattswim56Unattswim56 15 replies3 threads Junior Member
    Surprised it went up that much. I was expecting it to stay the same around 16-17%. What really surprised me is Colby College and how it went from over 30% 10 years ago to just 9% now.
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  • cookiedough39cookiedough39 7 replies1 threads New Member
    Does this mean Midd is going to way over enroll this year? If they think the yield rate goes down a lot but it doesn't actually...
    Seems really weird that other colleges didn't accept more students like Midd did.
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  • MWolfMWolf 2799 replies14 threads Senior Member
    It's still unclear what their calculations are, and why they are not doing what the rest of the NESCACs are doing.

    It actually makes little sense, considering that they have had over-enrollment in the past and it didn't go well. Alternatively, perhaps they know something that the other NESCACs don't.

    Perhaps they are thinking that the yield from international students would be low, or they expect many students to take gap years?
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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    It's not uncommon to see this type of thing, but the Campus' editor needs to check the paper's articles for math misinterpretations and related inconsistencies. The percentage increase from 16% to 24% is 50%, not 8% as stated in the article. And wasn't Middlebury's acceptance rate 17.4% last year?

    https://www.middlebury.edu/college/admissions/apply
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  • chrishudson1chrishudson1 51 replies1 threads Junior Member
    Yes, positive that Middlebury was right in that 17.2% to 17.6% acceptance rate range last year. That mathematical mistype is a huge misnomer.
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  • wisteria100wisteria100 4547 replies51 threads Senior Member
    Last year they had a big contingent come in through the waitlist. I think over 100 which is a big number for a school that size who also enrolls 50% of the class through ED. Maybe this year they accepted more in response to that yield?
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  • EmpireappleEmpireapple 2255 replies28 threads Senior Member
    Colby is soliciting applications and offering free applications too in an effort to bring up their number of applicants so they can boast a lower acceptance rate. My son gets an email from Colby every couple of weeks with the offer to apply. We never once contacted them or demonstrated any interest. Several colleges do this including Siena College in Loudonville, NY. It's all a game.

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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    Colleges can miss their enrollment targets if they rely too heavily on their waiting lists. This happened at Bucknell last year. Since it's likely that Middlebury wants to avoid this condition, its decision to admit a greater group of applicants at this stage may be well considered.

    https://www.inquirer.com/education/college-enrollment-student-bucknell-muhlenberg-ursinus-dickinson-20190930.html
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  • PublisherPublisher 11617 replies155 threads Senior Member
    The writer of the article used 8% in reference to the difference in the rate of admissions from 16% to 24%. The difference in the admissions rate is "24% minus 16% = 8%".

    THe increase in number of students admitted would be 50% (assuming that 16% & 24% figures are correct).
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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    edited April 9
    Publisher wrote: »
    The writer of the article used 8% in reference to the difference in the rate of admissions from 16% to 24%.

    This accurately could have been described as an increase of eight percentage points, a different concept (and, as an opinion, one too simple to mention). In any case, the paper missed an aspect of the article's potential lede (an acceptance rate that has increased by ~50%).
    edited April 9
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  • PublisherPublisher 11617 replies155 threads Senior Member
    edited April 9
    @merc81: We just disagree. I think that the article is correct, well written, and edited well.

    Your position is that you would prefer to sensationalize the increased rate of admission which the writer & editor deemed unnecessary. I would agree with your position if this were a tabloid newspaper sold in supermarket checkout lines, but not for a well written & well edited college campus newspaper.
    edited April 9
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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    edited April 9
    Publisher wrote:
    Your position is that you would prefer to sensationalize the increased rate of admission . . . .

    I'd like them to describe the math accurately or not mention it. And comprise doesn't mean what they they think it means, but that's another topic . . .
    edited April 9
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  • PublisherPublisher 11617 replies155 threads Senior Member
    I understand your point, but I think that the article fairly & repeatedly described the change in admission rate as an "uptick".

    Again, the article is well written & clearly communicates that Middlebury's rate of admission increased to 24% from 16%. The 8% uptick in the rate of admission resulted in 50% more students being admitted.
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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    edited April 9
    Yes, but they also wrote "a major uptick," which translates to "a major small increase." The article needs editing, @Publisher.
    edited April 9
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  • merc81merc81 11907 replies203 threads Senior Member
    Note that with this acceptance rate, Middlebury seems to have forecast its yield (~33%) for this year.
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  • circuitridercircuitrider 4014 replies183 threads Senior Member
    Interesting approach. They almost have to hope enough people opt to remain in-state or closer to home in order not to overflow its first-year beds. Other schools seem to have chosen an accelerated wait-list approach. Either way, there are sure to be "upticks" everywhere by summer's end.
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  • MWolfMWolf 2799 replies14 threads Senior Member
    I'm wondering whether, if there is over-enrollment, they will encourage students to take gap years. If this is successful, it would help with next year's yield.
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  • transfer1210transfer1210 31 replies0 threads Junior Member
    As a current Middlebury student, I can tell you that we don’t understand why Middlebury decided to accept that many more students. We received an email from Residence Life last week informing us that they are almost sure that they are expecting over enrollment, even more than last year. Due to this, they are turning rooms from doubles to triples and quads—and singles into doubles.

    Besides COVID-19, I also think Middlebury’s image/way of handling things has been on a downhill lately and the administration/admissions know this. For example, last week faculty rejected universal credit/no credit grading model despite the huge student movement, Professor Taylor, the current dean of the college, announced that she’s leaving Middlebury this summer to become the dean of Smith College, and also, “The College will fail to meet its budget this year by an estimated $17 million, and severe cuts are unavoidable.”

    This came from a faculty member who is advocating for Middlebury to let go of MIIS—Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California because of budget costs. And Charles Murray was scheduled to return back to speak on campus in May. God knows how that would have turned out.

    These issues are less internal and I believe more prospective students are aware of them. Just my thoughts.
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  • MWolfMWolf 2799 replies14 threads Senior Member
    As a current Middlebury student, I can tell you that we don’t understand why Middlebury decided to accept that many more students. We received an email from Residence Life last week informing us that they are almost sure that they are expecting over enrollment, even more than last year. Due to this, they are turning rooms from doubles to triples and quads—and singles into doubles.

    Besides COVID-19, I also think Middlebury’s image/way of handling things has been on a downhill lately and the administration/admissions know this. For example, last week faculty rejected universal credit/no credit grading model despite the huge student movement, Professor Taylor, the current dean of the college, announced that she’s leaving Middlebury this summer to become the dean of Smith College, and also, “The College will fail to meet its budget this year by an estimated $17 million, and severe cuts are unavoidable.”

    This came from a faculty member who is advocating for Middlebury to let go of MIIS—Middlebury Institute of International Studies in California because of budget costs. And Charles Murray was scheduled to return back to speak on campus in May. God knows how that would have turned out.

    These issues are less internal and I believe more prospective students are aware of them. Just my thoughts.


    The increase in number of students staying on campus is not expected to be from over enrollment of first years, but because there are about 200 students who were expected to study abroad, but likely will not be able to do so. The yield from first years for Vermont private colleges is expected to drop 10%-30%.

    As for the choice for universal pass/fail, well, colleges are not, and should not, be guided by what students want, when they make academic based decisions. So it doesn't really matter whether there is a "huge student movement".

    Middlebury is facing exactly the same situation that every other college is now facing, and is much better placed to weather this than the vast majority of colleges out there. Having an endowment of over a billion does help, you know. A budget shortfall of $17 million from a budget of close to $290 million is pretty small, all things considered.

    Also, so Professor Swenton thinks that Middlebury needs to get rid of the MIIS to save money. How does that relate to anything here?

    I'm sorry that you had to vacate the dorms and do the rest of your semester online. It sucks, but that is what life is like now. It will get better.
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