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Asking questions at interviews

mcatgladiatormcatgladiator Registered User Posts: 26 New Member
edited November 2013 in Multiple Degree Programs
I've received some conflicting advice about this. I thought you should allow the interviewer to lead the interview, but I've recently received advice that you should also try to make it like a conversation.

For instance: interviewer asks you why you want to do medicine. Instead of just answering, you ask the interviewer about why they got interested in medicine.

So is that right? Am I suppose to lead the conversation at times, or just answer the questions and talk about myself as much as possible?
Post edited by mcatgladiator on

Replies to: Asking questions at interviews

  • risuburisubu Registered User Posts: 1,580 Senior Member
    It's usually a bad idea to take control of the conversation during an interview. Answer the interviewer's questions in a straightforward manner, and then at the end perhaps he or she will ask you if you have any questions about the program. Asking questions during the allotted time demonstrates interest in the program/school while not being too pushy. At the end of the interview, it is perfectly acceptable to ask how your interviewer got into medicine. In fact, you could do it at the beginning of the interview if you so choose, just don't dodge your interviewer's questions by asking him or her another question.
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