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Should I do an undergrad/grad/phd degree in Computer Science at the age of 30-32?

varunsadhvarunsadh Registered User Posts: 2 New Member
I already have a 3 year bachelors degree in commerce from India. I consider it useless. Should I get into an undergrad computer science program in the US? I'm currently 30.

I would like to get into programming or artificial intelligence field after I graduate.

If not an undergrad degree then how about a Masters or PHD in Computer Science?

I'm a US citizen, will be studying in the US.

I'm currently living in India so I cannot take individual courses to makeup for prerequisites of a masters degree.

How can I improve my chances of getting into a top masters/phd program if I start classes in 2017?

In case I go for a second bachelors degree then financial aid will be limited. Getting fully funded is my main priority.

Plus I'm not too keen on staying unemployed for such a long period of time.

What are the pros and cons of my idea?

Replies to: Should I do an undergrad/grad/phd degree in Computer Science at the age of 30-32?

  • BrownParentBrownParent Registered User Posts: 12,776 Senior Member
    I don't see how you have determined that you want or need a PhD. Since you have not studied CS or participated in research, you simply have not tested if you enjoy it and have good potential as a researcher. I think that is such a long game say 6 or 7 years in research without knowing if you are well suited. So where is that coming from, just the funding aspect? You can't get into a good PhD program without prior research experience and the letters of recommendation attesting that you have good research potential.

    You are right, I can't see that you will get a 2nd undergraduate funded at all. Many places will not admit you for 2nd undergrad due to lack of space.

    So your best bet is to go for a MS, either in a program that will take you conditionally with prereqs you need or a program designed for non-majors. You really can't get into a top MS without an undergrad in CS, usually with research and/or relevant work experience. I think that will get you working more quickly and still be a valuable degree for the long run as you can learn and advance on the job. But you will have to pay for that degree.

    Some programs that come to mind
    Tufts post bac minor in CS - to prepare for work or grad school
    http://www.cs.tufts.edu/Other-Graduate-Programs/post-baccalaureate-computer-science-minor.html

    Penn MCIT
    http://www.seas.upenn.edu/prospective-students/graduate/programs/masters/mcit.php
  • MIN16QAKJMIN16QAKJ Registered User Posts: 66 Junior Member
    first of all... CS degree is really hot right now.. Programmers are in demand. I have few work in Silicon valley and also in Los Angeles. Demand for programmer will continue to grow in our life time and starting salary is very high.

    some of my friends have two year aa and making 6 figures.

    finding good programmer is such a scares, school ranking plays a small role in employment. oviously, MIT is better than 2 year game design school, but it won't impact your emplyemnt.



    I can't comment too much on Finanacial aid.. but I can't believe you will be out of luck because you attended school before you changed your mind. I'll be attending University of California - Davis this fall and College grant covered most of tuition. ( pheeww)


    Course Requirement for CS is quite intensive vs lib art majors. math, chem, physics, it's very science heavy.

    plan out the courses and see if you are up for it.

This discussion has been closed.