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Double majoring in Chemical Engineering and Finance? Good idea?

catsarecatscatsarecats Registered User Posts: 239 Junior Member
edited January 2013 in Northeastern University
I am very interested in both fields and understand they will be very time consuming. Can I fulfill this in 4 years at NEU?
Post edited by catsarecats on

Replies to: Double majoring in Chemical Engineering and Finance? Good idea?

  • neuchimieneuchimie Registered User Posts: 1,562 Senior Member
    Sorry, but no, definitely not. Both majors have pretty strict schedules on when and how many classes have to be taken, not to mention the fact that there is little to no overlap on course requirements.

    Add to that the fact that business ("finance", since there is no "finance" major, it's just a business major with a concentration in finance) requires co-op to graduate, so it's already under a tight schedule to do it in four years. With co-op, engineering ALONE is really tough to do in four years.

    So I really don't think you should get your hopes up about being able to double major in them.
  • catsarecatscatsarecats Registered User Posts: 239 Junior Member
    Any chance for minor?
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 13,085 Senior Member
  • catsarecatscatsarecats Registered User Posts: 239 Junior Member
    Thank you for the information.
  • laurenrplaurenrp Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    absolutely terrible idea. the ChemE requirements are so tight you don't have any time for extra classes unless you're graduating a few semesters late with a finance major. that too is a tight schedule.

    a business minor is do-able though. it's only 5 business classes. I've got friends in bio minoring in business.
  • collegecrazeycollegecrazey Registered User Posts: 182 Junior Member
    I am currently an engineering major at northeastern looking to graduate in 4 years. With some AP credit (about 4 classes) graduating in 4 years if very possible provided you don't fail a course. the engineering curriculum contains 4-5 general electives put into the curriculum. If you make all 5 of those the required classes for a minor, it is easily possible.

    I know someone doing French minor with EE and managed to study abroad as well. AP credit will cause an easier courseload but it is not required. I beleive double majoring with both is next to impossible....
  • laurenrplaurenrp Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    also, your advisor will think you're crazy and look at you like you have two heads. when I wanted to double minor in business/psych as a Bio major she laughed.
  • catsarecatscatsarecats Registered User Posts: 239 Junior Member
    If I major in biochemistry, I have 5 free elections, correct? And if I want to minor, it takes up all five electives, correct? I would like to do that but one small problem, I want to learn a language. It's kind of a big deal since it's my native language and I would love nothing more than to learn to how read/write it.
  • collegecrazeycollegecrazey Registered User Posts: 182 Junior Member
    Correct Most minors with a few exceptions require 5 classes. Also, other majors have more free elective spots. Specifically engineering has 4-5 because of the rigorous coursework. I am not sure about chemistry, but for example, computer science has 8 free electives , business degree with one concentration has 9 free electives.

    You still need the CORE but overall you should be fine. Also, if you want it you can always take some summer classes if you want if you find you cannot fit it in your schedule.
  • laurenrplaurenrp Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    to learn a language check out NU Calls. it's a free program to learn languages for students that don't have time/can't take language classes. they meet once a week and I think have a beginner/medium level of difficulty, correct me if I'm wrong. No credit, no grades, just a free opportunity to learn a language. you can even do it on coop.
  • neuchimieneuchimie Registered User Posts: 1,562 Senior Member
    Be very very careful about all this schedule planning in advance. A lot of people started off with ideas that they'd do X as a major, get Y as a minor, take some extra classes in Z, and graduate in four years with two co-ops-- all because they did the math at the and TECHNICALLY it could be done. Then they are very disappointed when it doesn't work out.

    Keep in mind that it's all about your schedule. What happens if you plan on taking a class for your minor in the spring, but it turns out not to be offered until the fall? What happens if you finished all your core and you can't go out of order with your major, but all the minor classes are full that semester? Even if you have X amount of slots in your college career and all the things you want to do equal X, doesn't mean you'll be able to do it. You need to expect that sometimes you might hit some snags.

    (Note: If you're taking business classes, you can put "Business Minor" on your resume for co-op and the career fair. It's not like anyone is going to check to see if you qualified for one yet. And if you can only do four of the classes, oh well. No one cares about minors after your graduate. Just take it off your resume.)
  • neuchimieneuchimie Registered User Posts: 1,562 Senior Member
    Wait... You went from Chemical Engineering and Finance to Biochemistry?

    I'm going to change my advice. You really need to stop and think about what you want to study. Chemical Engineering is an engineering degree. Nearly everyone with one will become an engineer. Finance majors go into finance (duh), corporate business, consulting, analysis, etc. Biochemistry is much more scientific and research based. Because of the field, most people find it hard to get a job other than a really low lab grunt unless they plan on getting a PhD or going to med school.

    They are completely different paths, and very difficult to switch between each other. I wouldn't be surprised at all if you began with a major in college, only to decide you wanted to pursue a different major. It happens all the time, and it's perfectly normal. But don't pick a major based on what minor you want to get or if you could finish in four years. Pick it because you WANT to study it and WANT the career paths it offers.
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