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Architecture or Urban Landscape Degree

N8isGr8N8isGr8 Registered User Posts: 9 New Member
Hello,

I'm interested in pursuing either an architecture or urban landscape degree at Northeastern (should I get in when I apply next year). I have a few questions about the program--

1. Is double majoring with the media and screen studies major feasible? What about a similar minor?
2. How strong should does my portfolio need to be? In other words, is work from a few years of studio art going to be enough?
3. Can anyone explain co-op? It looks really cool from what I've read around on their site, but I'm still a bit confused--is it an actual job that you apply and get payed for, or more like an internship?
4. Does the B.S. get you very far career wise, or is the added year for a masters worth it?
5. What is day-to-day life like? Is it as busy and rigorous as most other architecture programs seem to be?

Answers to any or all of these questions is greatly appreciated, as well as any other information that might be important about the program. Thanks!

Replies to: Architecture or Urban Landscape Degree

  • nanotechnologynanotechnology Registered User Posts: 2,526 Senior Member
    I can't really answer architecture-specific questions, but I can help with #3.

    Co-op is a job. You apply through Northeastern's database, where they have set up co-op positions with tons of different employers, or you can create your own position if you find a company willing to take you. Because co-ops are much longer than internships (6 months), you actually get to do real work and get a sense of what that type of job is really like. Not all co-ops are paid, but the vast majority of them are, and I don't know anyone in architecture who has had an unpaid co-op.

    I can also offer some outside perspective on #5: I had a roommate who was an architecture major, and it was crazy intense. She spent a ton of time in the studio at all hours of the night. But she enjoyed it!
  • N8isGr8N8isGr8 Registered User Posts: 9 New Member
    Thanks! The co-op program seems really interesting; is it very competitive? Also, if you do a co-op outside of Boston, will room and board be covered? Thanks again!
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