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What's the most merit aid you can get?

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Replies to: What's the most merit aid you can get?

  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 Registered User Posts: 3,673 Senior Member
    Perhaps they are beefing up the honors program, which is lackluster compared to other schools and using that as a marketing tool. I think NEU does garner a lot of top applicants because of merit , and if they scale back merit a lot, it may affect app numbers as you said. I don't think they are at a national noteriety level yet that they can afford to lose apps and increase admit rates (lower is better) so perhaps combining scholars and honors makes sense, as long as there is still a strong merit reward, which is ultimately what woos the students and their parents vs other schools that are $60k sticker price.
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,240 Senior Member
    Pretty sure merit awards will stay the same or even increase. The programs will be tweaked. Also, having looked at BU's honors college it seems to be very "restrictive" and geared more to arts and sciences students,
  • skipigskipig Registered User Posts: 17 New Member
    If I'm not mistaken, NEU is now saying they are fully meeting all financial need (As they define it.) Most schools that are "full need" do no give much if any merit awards. Is NEU planning on still providing both merit and need based aid ?
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,240 Senior Member
    Most schools that are "full need" do no give much if any merit awards.

    That is not at all true.
  • skipigskipig Registered User Posts: 17 New Member
    Okay......would anyone like to answer the gist of my question ? Thank you.
  • palm715palm715 Registered User Posts: 825 Member
    Maybe shelling out more financial aid grants instead of merit scholarships is the strategy. If you want to provide better financial aid grants, the money has to come from somewhere.

    My daughter did not get any merit from NU, but the COA is very similar to schools where she only got merit aid (Case Western) or a combination of financial and merit aid (U of Rochester, Stevens, Union). So for dollars out the door at our house, merit is just vanity money. I don't think my daughter cares what NU calls it, she's just thrilled to be able to attend.
  • skipigskipig Registered User Posts: 17 New Member
    edited June 2016
    @palm715. Thank you.
    Post edited by fallenchemist on
  • dcplannerdcplanner Registered User Posts: 644 Member
    Hopefully the changes will be improvements but they need to put it out there soon.
  • nanotechnologynanotechnology Registered User Posts: 2,526 Senior Member
    One of the benefits of merit aid over only need-based aid is for those of us whose real-world finances don't match the FAFSA EFC; I couldn't afford to attend need-only schools because FAFSA expected an incredibly unrealistic contribution from us (for various complicated reasons). Having merit-based aid fills that gap for some students.
  • aimingfortheskyaimingforthesky Registered User Posts: 106 Junior Member
    That's very true. I also really think that good grades should be rewarded, and that studying hard should make attendance possible. Just getting in isn't going to help when the price tag is $60,000, so in effect it is still unattainable without merit aid.
  • novafan1225novafan1225 Registered User Posts: 702 Member
    I do think there's a sense of entitlement to a high quality private education for high-performing high school students here, though. Like yes, good grades should be rewarded, but students with good grades *do* have access to education for low cost-- just at schools of potentially lower caliber. Almost any admitted student at NU in the modern era could've gotten a competitive merit offer at a less competitive school. I think private school is absurdly overpriced, yeah, but I'm not sure why high schoolers nationwide believe private schools owe them the cost of their education just for meeting their standards.
  • nanotechnologynanotechnology Registered User Posts: 2,526 Senior Member
    I think in a lot of cases it's not a sense of entitlement so much as a sense of feeling that it's unfair; a student with the same achievements but more money can attend where they cannot. As everyone's parents will say, "life's not fair," and we youngsters tend to idealistic visions of how things "should be." But when education at a "top" university is so often put on a pedestal as the path to future success (something I think CC also pushes), it can feel incredibly unjust.
  • suzyQ7suzyQ7 Registered User Posts: 3,673 Senior Member
    Plus universities have no problem giving freely to athletes (who have their athletic abilities to exchange for a top education). Top students often have academic abilities to give to schools and add value.
  • bbqburritobbqburrito Registered User Posts: 13 New Member
    In the past, could NU students reapply for the Scholars program if they were not admitted freshman year?
  • TomSrOfBostonTomSrOfBoston Registered User Posts: 14,240 Senior Member
    Honors yes, scholars no. Honors did not necessarily come with merit aid, Scholars was full tuition merit.
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