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University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing

BluebirdMadridBluebirdMadrid Registered User Posts: 30 New Member
edited August 2011 in Nursing Major
Hi. I am very new to College Confidential. I would like to know if the University of Pittsburgh will accept out of state students into their School of Nursing.
I have a 4.0 unweighted gpa. i volunteer at a hospital in Trauma Nursing each Sunday. I would like to go to one the best school in the country for Nursing. The best schools are not where i live. I've seen the listings and the threads. thank you for any response in advance.
Sincerely Bluebird.
Post edited by BluebirdMadrid on

Replies to: University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing

  • aglagesaglages Registered User Posts: 2,633 Senior Member
    Of course Pitt will accept qualified OOS students. Are you a HS student or currently in college looking to transfer? BTW - there are some very GOOD nursing programs on the left coast. You don't have to come to frigid Pittsburgh to find a great program.
  • BluebirdMadridBluebirdMadrid Registered User Posts: 30 New Member
    thanks Aglages. i am a high school junior. according to the list on this site (which is very helpful by the way, thank you..), there aren't many 4 year BSNs on our side that can compete with University of Pittsburgh. the OOS tuition is very reasonable when compared to, say, Michigan. Our region touts USF, and rated lower are Seattle and Mt St Marys. non-BSN State CSU system has really fallen, not to mention impacted enrollment and lack of course availability. Then there is UCLA and UCI.
    my thinking is to start at the top undergrad education, with single-digit USNewsWR grad level.
    Frigid? flipflop weather compared to Tahoe in winter, or am i wrong? i remember seeing a cold game on tv at Heinz field.
  • isimarie620isimarie620 Registered User Posts: 207 Junior Member
    I'm a HS senior, and I'm out in pgh weather every friday night (HS football games lol)....It might just be because I'm used to it by now, but it's honestly not that bad here. Sure, temps can drop, but I don't remember them going much lower than freezing in the dead of winter. Summers here can be sweltering, and fall and spring are beautiful.

    I wear flipflops to school in November sometimes. :) It just depends
  • aglagesaglages Registered User Posts: 2,633 Senior Member
    Two issues:

    1. The weather in Pittsburgh
    I live just outside of Pittsburgh and to ME it seems VERY cold and gray. No it's not Minnesota or the norther Rockies, but very cold...to me. Just my opinion and I have lived in many other areas of the country. As for wearing flip-flops in November...I have never done THAT.

    2. Left coast schools
    Keep in mind that the nursing school ratings that you've probably read are for graduate nursing programs. AFAIK there isn't anything current for undergrad nursing. However NIH funding and the availability of good research hospital(s) reasonably close to the school are IMHO good indicators. I think you are smart to primarily consider direct entry nursing programs. I'm not sure whether the following are direct entry but if they are I would consider them along with the Midwest/Eastern schools that you mentioned. That said I have heard that UCSF (About the School - UCSF School of Nursing - University of California, San Francisco - nurseweb.ucsf.edu), University of Washington (School of Nursing | School of Nursing) and UCLA (Why Pick the UCLA School of Nursing? | UCLA School of Nursing) are all supposed to be top notch programs.

    FREE advice: Find a good direct entry undergrad program that doesn't put you in too much debt, work hard and apply yourself. After you graduate and have a year or two of experience take that (hopefully) great college GPA and apply to a post-grad nursing program that is rated highly in the nursing specialty that you want to study.

    If Pitt is what you want....great! Apply early. According to my daughter there are quite a few left coast students in the nursing program for some of the same reasons you mentioned. Pack warmly and good luck!
  • Parent100Parent100 Registered User Posts: 93 Junior Member
    Bluebird, Pitt OOS nursing tuition is actually quite high at more than $31k. (Have you noted that nursing school tuition is higher than other schools at Pitt?) Throw in fees, room and board and you are over $40k. I'm guessing UCLA or UCI would be about half that?

    Pitt does give some generous merit scholarships to top students. Your 4.0 with rigorous courses and strong SAT/ACT score might make Pitt cheaper than UC.

    Good luck.
  • BRUINnursingBRUINnursing Registered User Posts: 32 Junior Member
    UCLA and UCI are about $30K a year if you're in state and living on campus. I've heard it's about $50K if you're out of state. The UC's don't offer much financial aid either, just something to consider. Oh, and UCSF is a grad school only. They don't accept undergrad students for any major, right? At least that's what I thought. Correct me if I'm wrong, because I'm just a student, not a counselor or anything.

    As for the weather, good luck on the east coast! I've lived in SoCal all my life, and I dread winters here; if the temperature drops below 65, I curl up with a warm blanket. I would die in Pennsylvania :)
  • aglagesaglages Registered User Posts: 2,633 Senior Member
    ^^^I believe you are correct about UCSF....and the winters in Pittsburgh.
  • charlieschmcharlieschm Registered User Posts: 4,282 Senior Member
    Penn State and Pitt are both state-related universities, not state owned. That means they are run independent of the state. They don't have to accept a certain percentage of in-state students. While some state universities reserve most nursing seats for in-state students, I don't think that is true for Pitt and Penn State. Penn State specifically states that they do not give any preference in admission to in-state applicants (which actually irritates me as a PA taxpayer).

    Often, state universities prefer out of state students for bragging rights ("students from 45 states") and because they get more tuition money.
  • BluebirdMadridBluebirdMadrid Registered User Posts: 30 New Member
    Wow was the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing incredibly wonderful on the phone today! We're visiting in October for open house. I've got another year to go, but it's never too early. There~~I've ruined my own thread.
This discussion has been closed.