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Too many college transfers on resume

DaonBambiDaonBambi 3 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
I'll try to make it short, but this can be a long story.

I have transferred 3 times so far, my major is pre-nursing, international undergraduate.

I really wanted to be a RN. I've taken TEAS test for the nursing program my score is fine. My school requires me to take a TOEFL for the program again, since I am an international student, which I think this doesn't make sense. I've tried the test so many times, but I couldn't reach the score that they want.

I almost made it, only two scores behind, but I am just so frustrated and kinda lost hope.
I've spent too much money on this test, too. (about $1000 for four times)
I feel like I will never make it in here.

So I have considered other schools and contacted them for potential chances and I found that CC(comunity college) can be a better option for me if I want to keep on track as a nursing student.

I am pretty positive that I can be in the program in CC pretty soon.
However, if I am going to do it, then it's going to be my 4th transfer.
I know it's not going to look good on my resume.

Otherwise, I have to change my major, which I really hate to do.
I am getting older. I need to think about the reality.
Don't think about the dream for now and just pursue a degree.

Should I just change my major? Is it too risky for me to transfer?

I need some serious advice.
Thanks for reading this! I would love to hear your opinion.
9 replies
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Replies to: Too many college transfers on resume

  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 8839 replies325 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 19
    I really wanted to be a RN. I've taken TEAS test for the nursing program my score is fine. My school requires me to take a TOEFL for the program again, since I am an international student, which I think this doesn't make sense. I've tried the test so many times, but I couldn't reach the score that they want....I've spent too much money on this test, too. (about $1000 for four times) I feel like I will never make it in here.

    Where do you expect to work? You can't be a nurse in the US and hand out meds and do medical procedures if you don't have a solid command of English. And graduating here doesn't guarantee that you can get a job and stay. Does your home country have nursing programs?
    edited August 19
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  • DaonBambiDaonBambi 3 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Thanks for the reply! Yes, there are nursing programs in my home country. Actually, I was a nursing student in there (already in the program) wanted to work abroad or in the US in the future. That's the main reason that I transferred to the US. I understand that it is hard to get a job in the US as an international student. I also have a CNA(nurse aide license in Nebraska)
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  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 8839 replies325 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I have a lot of friends who are nurses. US hospitals and medical practices pay a lot for malpractice insurance. I don't know if they'll risk hiring someone who can't pass the TOEFL and who had to attend 5 different schools to get a nursing degree. In order to hire you over a US applicant they would have to prove that you're qualified. Unfortunately, it doesn't sound like they could do that.

    If finances are an issue why not get a degree in your home country and get some experience there? If your goal is just to work in the US I think you're throwing good money after bad. The chances of that are remote.
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  • DaonBambiDaonBambi 3 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Many other schools doesn't require TOEFL for the program bc the students already took it when they got accepted school. I was okay with this first when I first started my school year, I already passed the program TOEFL requirement, too. However, my school recently increased the score requirement. There were many international students in the program, but not anymore. Even the students who are English is their first language couldn't pass it. It's sad, but that's true. But I got what you are saying very well. Your advice was helpful. Thanks
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  • Groundwork2022Groundwork2022 2102 replies31 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    How many years of college have you completed among those three transfers? It is okay to start in community college, but transferring into a community college seems like a bad idea at this point. It pretty much guarantees that at least one more transfer will be necessary in order to complete your degree. That means, unless you go back to study in your own country, you either pass the TOEFL now or you need to pass it later. Too many transfers and, yes, colleges are going to see red flags.
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  • teambyerlineteambyerline 60 replies3 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Many community colleges are now offering degree programs that allow you to get your degree at the cc but your diploma will have the name of their partner 4 yr college.
    For instance: one of our local cc, Grossmont College, has a 4 yr RN program. You take all of your classes at the cc, do all of your internships through the cc, but when your graduate your diploma says Point Loma Nazarene College (a very good local private college).
    One big benefit of going this route is cost. The cost of is roughly $47,000/yr however the cost to obtain the same exact degree with the same exact name at the cc is only $5700 (plus the cost of 2 yrs of ge classes at cc which is minimal).
    I was a nurse for many years and I have many friends who are currently nurses and frankly there are many nurses who do not have a command of the English language and who are very difficult to understand. Your Toeffl will not make any difference to any job you apply to. They don't care about this. All they care about is that you graduated from an RN program and you passed your state boards.
    As far as your resume is concerned I would put on the school that you completed the majority of your general education at and then the school your diploma states from the RN program. In my example above these students would not put their RN program as Grossmont Community even though they went here they would put Point Loma Nazarene.
    Currently nursing in the US is understaffed and there are many open jobs. Here is San Diego not only are our nurses understaffed they have daily offers to be travel nurses and go live in nearly every other state as well as abroad. As long as your graduate you should find a job relatively easily especially if you begin working at the hospital as a CNA now and move up once you graduate.
    Last thing, I have no idea how competitive the nursing program is where you are. Here, all of our programs are very competitive. In order to even apply for the cc nursing program you must complete ALL of your GE classes and even more importantly you need almost a perfect college GPA to get into the program. Why would they accept a B student when they have all A students and only 45 spots to fill every year.
    Before you make the change, I would go to the cc and talk with them about their program. Who is their university partner? What are their requirements? How competitive is it and bring your transcripts to see if you would even be able to try to get in. It may be too late for this year, maybe not. I know our cc sends out letters to those who applied in April/May for the next fall and you can only start in the fall.
    If you have your heart set on nursing then become a nurse. You can and should go the cc route if possible but do not leave your current school unless you know it is for sure possible.
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 29249 replies57 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @teambyerline , has some solid directed advice here. Yes, nursing programs are highly competitive. But you are not applying for one right now You Are applying to prenursing programs. Those are a whole different story from nursing programs.

    Your grades and the specific courses needed to get into a nursing program are what counts, along with other criteria programs will have. In my area, one needs nearly a 4.0 to get into a nursing program. It’s that competitive. You do the research and see where this prenursing program usually sends their grads and what it takes to get into those nursing programs. I don’t think the number of transfers is going to matter much. Your GPA, the courses and how recently taken (the ones essential to the nursing program) will likely be the biggest factors.
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  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 8839 replies325 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited August 20
    Does anyone know what the chances are that a hospital or medical practice will sponsor an international graduate? OP has already been to 4 US colleges. I wouldn't advise spending a lot more money on US schools if OP can never work here. One of the criteria for sponsorship is proving the candidate is more qualified than any US applicant who applies. I've been involved in competing the paperwork required for that and it's not easy. There's no guarantee OP will meet the criteria.
    edited August 20
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  • DaonBambiDaonBambi 3 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Thanks for the reply! TOEFL is not required in my country's nursing program or in many other nursing programs in the US. I have spent 3 yrs in total because the credits from my home country didn't count in the US colleges. I am done with my gen-eds.
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