right arrow
GUEST STUDENT OF THE WEEK: ski_racer, a high-achiever in high school, was rejected by some of the elite schools she applied to. This rejection was the best thing that happened to her as she got to choose her own path. Learn how she fell in love with her safety school, ASK HER ANYTHING!
Make sure to check out our August Checklist for HS Seniors. Consult these quick resources to get you started on the process this month.
As we work to adjust to the current reality, make sure to check out these dedicated COVID-19 resources: our directory of virtual campus tours, our directory of extended deadlines, as well as the list of schools going test optional this fall.

The Real Cost of For-Profit Colleges

Dave_BerryDave_Berry CC Admissions Expert 511 replies3090 threads CC Admissions Expert
"FOR-PROFIT, FOUR-YEAR colleges advertise sticker prices that are, on average, somewhere between those of public and private nonprofit colleges. But experts encourage students considering for-profit colleges to look critically at other factors that contribute to cost, too, like the amount of institutional aid available, how long it takes to earn a degree and the value of that degree.

The average price of tuition and fees for first-time, full-time undergraduate students at degree-granting four-year for-profit colleges was $17,000 in 2017-2018, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

For comparison, that's more than public four-year colleges, which cost $9,000 on average in the same year, and less than that of private nonprofit colleges that were priced at, on average, $34,600 in 2017-2018." ...

https://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/paying-for-college/articles/the-real-cost-of-for-profit-colleges
1 replies
· Reply · Share

Replies to: The Real Cost of For-Profit Colleges

  • RichInPittRichInPitt 2450 replies40 threads Senior Member
    edited November 2019
    Key phrase there is the value of the degree. The article points out the challenges of many for-profit schools at the end.

    Unfortunately,
    "I think it's safe to say the majority of for-profit schools do not have good outcomes," Howarth says. "There are probably a few that are good at what they do, but without really delving into reputation, a general wariness about the sector is warranted."

    Interested students need to be very diligent in their research.
    edited November 2019
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity