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Online Degree vs. Traditional

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Replies to: Online Degree vs. Traditional

  • Vincey37Vincey37 23 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    You've got to be kidding me. Did you really just evaluate the quality of a university on whether they have a football program or not?

    I've got a better idea. How about we decide whether a school is legitimate by if they are accredited? News flash, the University of Phoenix is institutionally accredited by one of the six regional agencies recognized by the Dept. of Education to do so. This is the exact same level of external oversight and approval the University of Memphis has.

    Think of Phoenix what you want (and it's obvious some employers think it's not so great), but calling it a diploma mill is laughable. You can't use a diploma mill degree to get into an ABA law school, something a quick Google search will demonstrate many Phoenix grads have accomplished.
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  • mildredmildred 613 replies73 threadsRegistered User Member
    Vincey37

    I would assume that everyone on this area of the site is aware of the accrediting agencies which are recognised by the US Dept. of Ed. Oh look, here is the US Dept. Of Ed. listing of accrediting agencies...


    http://www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/accred/index.html



    In my opinion, when it comes to online degree options, I think a quick and simple rule would be to see if the University has a legit brick and mortar campus.
    Another really quick and easy rule of thumb is that a University which has sporting teams as well as such things as a fully functioning physical library are indicators of the University being on the up and up.

    I have yet to see any long term studies which indicate that folks who graduate from Diploma Mills go on to such places as medical school and the like. I do know that one who attends a normal University does not have to make an attempt to justifying their mode of schooling through such a thing as a google search. Please note that I am not, at all, referring to you personally.


    The only thing I know is that in the real world human resource managers are not ones for Diploma Mills. Until there is a legit long term study done on such a thing as graduates from Diploma Mills becoming easy hires in the work force and the like, I will stand by my opinion.

    Please note that it is always when one has to defend their choice in University that the chickens come home to roost. For example, my idea of keeping the University of Memphis on my list of potential grad schools is: quick, easy, simple, and realistic. No employer would doubt the validity of what could very well be my future Graduate level coursework at that University. In no small part because such things as their sporting teams lend credence and validity to the fact that the University of Memphis is a real live g haul University.



    Anyone else would just get in their studying somewhere normal and move on. And, it literally breaks my heart when folks do not see that there are more legit options for their higher education. I am not, Vincey37, making reference to you personally. Since you are new to this web site, I am assuming you will be able to take my response to your "post" in good humor.
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  • Vincey37Vincey37 23 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Well mildred, you may want to rethink your choice of graduate school, because the University of Memphis shows one of the undergraduate schools represented in their current law school class is the DeVry Institute of Technology - which I'm sure you would classify as a diploma mill. Do you really want to be associated with a school that accepts diploma mill alumni for graduate study?

    Since it appears you are attempting to cast doubt on my "post" by calling into question my time here on the forum, I should point out I have been a member here since 2005, far longer than you. Perhaps the difference is I do not create as many "posts" spreading misinformation such as calling legitimate schools "diploma mills"?
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  • mildredmildred 613 replies73 threadsRegistered User Member
    Well mildred, you may want to rethink your choice of graduate school, because the University of Memphis shows one of the undergraduate schools represented in their current law school class is the DeVry Institute of Technology - which I'm sure you would classify as a diploma mill. Do you really want to be associated with a school that accepts diploma mill alumni for graduate study?

    Vincey 77. As I have explained already, The University of Memphis is basically my worse case scenario grad school choice in the event that I find really nice employment in the city in which my current University is located. I am not going to defend my having a very realistic and open list of potential grad schools.


    Now I would think it interesting as to why you feel as though you can assume what I would consider to be a diploma mill, but I can tell you are being argumentative just for the sake of being argumentative. I also would think it interesting to know why you are fixated on Law Schools, but I do not really care to bother with that.


    Since it appears you are attempting to cast doubt on my "post" by calling into question my time here on the forum, I should point out I have been a member here since 2005, far longer than you. Perhaps the difference is I do not create as many "posts" spreading misinformation such as calling legitimate schools "diploma mills"?


    Calling a spade a spade is not spreading misinformation. I am still waiting for the day that there will have been long term, longitudinal studies done on the future employment opportunities of folks who are graduates from diploma mills. Until that day comes, one can assume whatever they care to. That is fine by me, I am not a mean girl. Also, posting a hyperlink of the web site for the US Higher Ed accrediting agencies is not a bad thing at all and it does not constitute misinformation. One can look up the University of Phoenix and whatever the heck else from that site. It is not a bad thing to do.



    I really could care less as to how long anyone has been a member of any web site at all. I am not a gentleman and am, therefore, not one for: "mine is larger than yours" type of arguments. I was just under the presumption that you did not read the rules of this site or something.


    I notice, having read through your postings, that you are on the verge of graduating University. Perhaps the hostility you have decided to express towards me comes from your just wondering what it is you will be doing with regards to Graduate School? If it is, then that is alright. No big deal. We all feel like that when going through major life changing events and the like, man. It will be alright.

    Now, what I am going to do is call things a day. You just try and have a nice day. I am sure things will work out alright for you, and I am sorry if I somehow rubbed you the wrong way.
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  • Vincey37Vincey37 23 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Couple things -

    I fail to see how it is possible to draw a distinction between Phoenix and DeVry. They are both for profit schools which operate on identical business models.

    I don't think people who did actual work for a degree from one of those school s would appreciate you classifying them in the same category as those who bought their degree for $550 plus shipping. Trying to demonstrate that difference is not being argumentative for the sake of argument.

    Before you question my law school data, where is yours? Right, you have none for your "degree mill" claim. And the reason I used law schools is that they are typically the only type of graduate program to post the undergraduate schools of their incoming classes.

    Just because I'm arguing with you on the Internet doesn't mean I'm upset about something. I sure hope you aren't taking this personally.

    Anyway, I can see there is no convincing you and people can make up their own minds after reading this thread. You have a nice day as well and best of luck with your studies.
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  • admisscounsadmisscouns 182 replies0 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    University of Phoenix is the best of the online degree programs which is not tied to an already established college or university, which is why it achieved accreditation. However, it still raises questions in the eyes of some graduate schools and with some potential employers. That is a factor which needs to be considered when undertaking the degree program. Perhaps over time this perception will change but, for now, some folks may prefer to play it safe and pursue a program which they do not have to defend to others. Whether right or wrong, it is a legitimate perspective.
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  • DiceyDicey 110 replies13 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I think the issue with these types of degrees, whether they are from GW or University of Phoenix, will always be, "how can we be sure you didn't cheat?" Even with the non-selective brick and mortar schools that offer classes mainly conducted online, I know someone who pays others to submit the web work in lieu of doing their own assignments or even partaking in the discussions. Even the most rigorous accredited online programs can be a sham in that way unless every single grade is based solely on regularly scheduled, stringently proctored exams. But in that scenario, what's the point of an online school anyway? State schools are like that already...
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  • TooRichForAidTooRichForAid 1018 replies1 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Columbia has online program for Engineering.
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  • Hi-PowerHi-Power 167 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    overanxious mother, I think that's more a reflection on the University of Phoenix than on-line degrees in general. If she got an on-line degree from a brick and mortar school, nobody would even know that she did it entirely on-line.
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  • Hi-PowerHi-Power 167 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    "how can we be sure you didn't cheat?"

    The exams are proctored.
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  • letmeinnowletmeinnow 79 replies12 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I just read this article this morning and I think it might interest you all. The writer interviewed employers, HR professionals and students to find out the answer to this question:

    Do Employers Value Online Degrees? | myUsearch blog
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  • OnlineDegreeOnlineDegree 12 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    These days with so many Online Colleges option it is not impossible to compare Online degrees with that of Traditional. Universities like: Bakers College Online, University of Phoenix, Westwood College, Capella University, Walden University are some of the mainstream online colleges. I would say Yes to Online Degrees.
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  • OnlineDegreeOnlineDegree 12 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Yes with recognized universities offering Online Degree Programs, the employees do take these degrees as seriously as any regular college degree.
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  • Aquarius76Aquarius76 5 replies1 threadsRegistered User New Member
    momof1, good for you! that is the way to do it :)
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  • jatl80jatl80 17 replies0 threads- New Member
    Online schools are a great option for people pursuing degrees higher than high school. I'd really recommend doing your research. Visit edu.com and view a complete list of online schools and programs that will fit your needs and experience.
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  • saturday_bellsaturday_bell 5 replies2 threadsRegistered User New Member
    i go to university of phoenix and i went to a community college when i was 21 i find the online course load hard with lots of reading. i know college students at regular colleges say that online isent hard well it is. yes i only have to take two at a time but guess what there 9 weeks long, tons of reading 3 assignments a week perclass and one class compared to my college experience at 21 is like 2 or 3 in a on campus school. plus online you have to take more responsibility you have to depend on your self more, you dont have the option to work with your teacher or have study groups to help learn the info. i find it more difficult. but im for it. i think a online degree is just as acceptable as off line
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  • cooldw57cooldw57 56 replies21 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Depends on the school name, if you have an online degree from USC, Columbia, Stanford or MIT, you'll get way more career opportunities than pure online schools like U of Phoenix. Plus, these top universities have alumni connections you could take advantage at, these connections you made through college/grad school are far more valuable than any class instructions.
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  • MBA Grad 2009MBA Grad 2009 224 replies3 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    I earned my BA from Baylor University, and my MBA from the University of Houston at Victoria. Both schools are AACSB-accredited, both schools have brick-n-mortar campuses and compete in NCAA sports. Guess which one was where I attended classes online?

    My point is, you want to consider what the name of the school says, its accreditation and whether the courses are the same for online as for face-to-face classes. Never choose a school in hopes it will be easy or quick, always consider how potential employers or next-level schools will regard your degree, and be sure to consider if you will be proud of your degree ten years after the fact, or try to make up for it as if it were an embarrassment.

    Speaking as a manager, I agree that many for-profit online schools like U/Phoenix and Devry may provide a solid education, but it is undeniable that they are not considered equal to established state and private schools. On the one hand, there are undoubtably cases where that bias is unfair to the graduates of such schools, but on the other it's a legal practice and you'd better be aware that it happens.

    Online schools have a stigma mostly for younger students, since the assumption is that they could and should go to "regular" schools. When older students go to school, it is socially more acceptable to consider an online school due to family and work restrictions, especially when you go back to satisfy a more or less formality in obtaining a higher degree - you earn your promotion more on your resume than on your degree, and so the school's name is much less significant when you're over 30.
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  • CollegeBratCollegeBrat 3 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Finished up my degree at UOP and got a job right out of college in my field about a year ago. Didn't seem to have any negative effect. I did attend online and on campus which to me seems harder AND better for you as your instructors currently work in the fields they teach and the classrooms are smaller so you have more one-on-one time. It's also harder to cheat that way, :p
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  • HaleiwaHaleiwa 1 replies0 threadsRegistered User New Member
    Sorry for the long post. I fully agree that for-profit online degrees do not carry the same weight as established brick and mortar by itself. "By itself" being the key here. I will keep this solely about Bachelor's degrees. This is coming from someone that has both a state college Bachelor's degree in Sociology (totally useless out of college as far as gaining employment) and recently a for-profit, accredited, online BS Bus Admin degree (Walden).

    If you are just out of high-school or do not have any "real world business" experience beyond low-level retail etc; then definitely go to a brick and mortar.

    If you already have significant "real world business" experience or skills then go online. If you have other qualities to back it up, an online degree is a great addition to your resume. Also if you have kids, etc, another good reason to go online. Yes, it's expensive, but also "time is money". Brick and mortar school online courses are longer.

    I am experienced in my field and fortunately have the added skills of being fluent in Mandarin and English, so I may not a very good example as I never had issues with employment. But this latest degree definitely allowed me to demand a raise and make companies compete for my services, even in the current economy.

    Also, online for-profit school legitimacy will improve. The stigma exists, but I was pleasantly surprised to learn most graduates are already experienced professionals, very articulate, experienced, and very skilled. Such "late bloomer/late degree holder" adults in the workforce are going to increase very quickly in the coming years and compete with "brick and mortar" bachelor's graduates.

    For lack of better terms, these late bloomers are desperate in this economy, will work extremely hard, and employers will start to see this. I'm 29 and not yet a parent, but I know many such late bloomer parents around 35~45 and they will walk across landmines to take that job from you. Espeically today. Once more of them show results, the more they will become legitimized among HR. Also, keep in mind, more people in HR will also come from online for profit schools.
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