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Kitchen Remodel

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Replies to: Kitchen Remodel

  • MotherOfDragonsMotherOfDragons 3934 replies25 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^^ I think that's a good idea if you don't mind a busy countertop. It would make me crazy. I need the countertop as bare as possible. (there's a funny scene in Absolutely Fabulous where Edina screams 'surfaces" and sweeps all the clutter off of her kitchen counters. My family does that to me every time I'm decluttering now :).

    Our Kitchenaid dishwasher is on its last legs at 8 years old. I've had it serviced three times, and each time it's for the food grinder. The stupid thing breaks and clogs constantly. I'm going to get a new Bosch WITHOUT a grinder the next time it breaks (three times and it's out on the next break is our rule for appliances). The Bosch's have a much lower repair incidence according to Communist Reports, and they're quieter because there's no grinder. The food just rinses down the pipe.

    Assuming you don't leave burritos stuck to your plates, this should be sufficient. And the quieter will be good because we have an open floorplan and we can hear the dishwasher.
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  • MotherOfDragonsMotherOfDragons 3934 replies25 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Oh, I should add one thing about ovens. I have a viking six burner oven, and it is a fantastic workhorse. It has no electronics on it-it's all gas. No LED lights, no computer circuits to blow, not even a timer. It does one thing, and it does it incredibly well. At first I missed having a timer on the oven, but now, I am completely a fan and will never have another type of oven. It's bulletproof, and it's made in the united states.

    You can find them used, occasionally, and I'd totally get a used one if I were remodeling. The people who have super high end kitchens rarely use their Vikings, but they like to replace them with the latest model every few years, so you can get a fantastic oven if you're patient and hunt for them. A good place to look is to leave word with a countertop shop-sometimes when they do a high end remodel the owner will be getting rid of all the appliances and if the shop knows you want them, you can sometimes get a really good deal.

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  • CT1417CT1417 4344 replies22 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @MotherOfDragons -- question for you. We have had a Kitchen Aid D/W for maybe 11 years and have never had it serviced, but I am a bit too thorough in rinsing plates before placing in D/W, mostly b/c we do not run it every night, and I can't imagine how the D/W could clean the food off after 36 hours. A friend said that her repairman for her very high-end D/W (can't recall brand.... maybe Miele) told her that we are supposed to leave food on plates. Otherwise plate surface will be scratched????

    My experience with appliance repair has gotten me to the point that I replace before repairing, at least once the appliance has reached a certain age. Every repair seems to require two visits and can then run $300-$400. I have also started purchasing extended warranties even though I realize they are a bad deal financially.

    So my question is why you are willing to repair three times? Have you not paid for the replacement of a new unit before then?
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  • Nrdsb4Nrdsb4 16804 replies156 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited January 2016
    @bjkmom, I'm late to this forum and just saw your post about porcelain tile floors that look like wood. I saw some on a TV show that looked weathered gray, and were laid in this beautiful diagonal pattern. My question would be are they slippery (you addressed that) and do they chip if you drop something on them?

    I have had under cabinet lighting for almost twenty years now in our various homes and love it. Someone told me that they had LED lights mounted under their cabinets, and how pretty the glow is in comparison to the fluorescent type bulbs we have. I'm interested in looking into that.

    As to dishwashers, I've had Miele and now Asko. Good in terms of mechanics and longevity, not so great in how the drawers are designed. Doesn't make a lot of sense to me.
    edited January 2016
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  • thumper1thumper1 73770 replies3215 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited January 2016
    We have LED lights under all our cabinets. They are battery powered...and stick to the under side of the cabinets...and we really like them.
    edited January 2016
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  • Nrdsb4Nrdsb4 16804 replies156 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @coralbrook, I saw someone discussing the induction cook top on Property Brothers (I'm an HGTV addict). The client said "and these are better than gas!" I'd never heard of them, and have always loved gas. Is this true, and in what ways are the induction tops better?
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  • MotherOfDragonsMotherOfDragons 3934 replies25 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @CT1417 It's usually about 80 bux for the repair guy to come out and dig around in the machine and get it running again, so 3 repairs =$240 bux. A new dishwasher is about $700 (at least the one I"m looking at), and I hate to add to the giant trash pile our world is becoming, so I'll do the "three strikes, then you're out" on most appliances.
    A friend said that her repairman for her very high-end D/W (can't recall brand.... maybe Miele) told her that we are supposed to leave food on plates. Otherwise plate surface will be scratched????

    Yeah, the repair guy told your friend that so he'll get to keep coming out to repair her very expensive dishwasher.
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  • greenwitchgreenwitch 8703 replies41 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Induction cooktops are very fast, and cool just as quickly. So, you can boil water, remove the pot, touch the surface, and not burn your hand. You do need to have a certain kind of pot or pan for it to work. I think it needs to be ferrous, like cast iron, because the cooking method is electromagnetic. There is special cookware available that is not as heavy as traditional cast iron and is coated with stainless steel.

    Candace Olson also loves them! I'm sticking with gas for now.
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  • CT1417CT1417 4344 replies22 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @MotherOfDragons -- OK, at $80/visit, I would make the same decision. At $200/visit, I move on, unless the appliance is relatively new.
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  • bookwormbookworm 8807 replies72 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I am a rinSer, as my dishes often sit. The salesman loves his KA, but I like that Bosch doesn't have the grinder and the heat. I do like the third row for silverware and utensils.
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  • Bromfield2Bromfield2 3550 replies35 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Love the third row for silverware--IMO gets the stuff cleaner than ither arrangements. Miele has the third row too.
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  • Nrdsb4Nrdsb4 16804 replies156 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited January 2016
    In this state, a 2-bowl sink is required.

    @Consolation, why is that?

    In the first house we built, we had the big sink/smaller sink thing. The smaller sink has the disposal in it (same setup in the lake house we bought). I HATED it because you're emptying fairly large volumes into the disposal, but the sink is so shallow that water splashes back out, all over me and the counters and onto the floor. The second house, I got a second sink that was a little deeper, but still basically had the same problem. We didn't build our most recent house, and it has that same damn setup. I vow that if we ever build again (I'd like to build a one story house in the next five years), I will get one deep stainless modern farmhouse type sink so that I don't have this problem ever again. It never occurred to me that there would be a state rule of some kind mandating double sinks!
    edited January 2016
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  • mom60mom60 7773 replies502 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    My old Bosch I didn't rinse and the dishes always came out clean. My new Bosch doesn't clean as well. I now rinse. My frustration is that oatmeal, quinoa, rice or small grains can get stuck in the small holes on the sprayer arms. When this happens the dishes must not get enough water and I end up with a lot of sediment on the items in the top rack.
    I have found an excellent washer/dryer repairman he isn't expensive and I trust him. He is a 1 man operation.i also have a great refrigeration guy. He mainly does commercial refrigeration but also works on built in refrigerators. He keeps telling me that he is retiring. I dread that day. I have had repairmen come out from larger companies and I find it is expensive and I sometimes uncomfortable with the guys they send. Thinking about it the repairman who worked on my oven is also a one man show.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33097 replies358 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    From the plates and utensils perspective, it's the hot water, detergent, and sometimes the drying cycle that can etch. Not hand rinsing. (My dw heats the water.)


    My dw drains into the disposal and gets ground there. Considering the small exit hose, I did ask the repair guy about rinsing. After all, it can't move larger chunks. He laughed and told me not to believe marketing hype, to go ahead and rinse.
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  • bjkmombjkmom 7940 replies158 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @Nrdsb4

    I love our floors!! Absolutely not slippery.

    And, knock wood, nothing that has dropped on them this far has done any damage to the floor. Because it's tile, it's pretty unforgiving, and we've lost a plate or two and probably an equal number of glasses. But the floor still looks gorgeous!
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  • lvvcsflvvcsf 2299 replies57 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Another challenge with induction is the initial cost and the fact that you will need 240 volt circuit for a complete stove top. IKEA now sells an induction cooktop for under $1000. Most are close to double that or more. They are very efficient, however gas is much cheaper than electricity in most areas. I like the idea of induction cooking. They are easier to clean, safer with children or for older adults as they will only heat the pan they don't heat the stove ( be aware the cooktop will be hot where the cookpan is because of the heat of the pan) once the pan is removed the cooktop will cool very quickly. Unlike a glass top electric cook top food won't burn on to the surface.
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  • ConsolationConsolation 22863 replies184 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    @NrdsB4, it's a required if you want to get your kitchen certified for food production, not for everyone. :)

    The reason for it is that supposedly one bowl is for washing, and one for disinfecting. I never used them that way, I relied on the dishwasher on the extra hot cycle for disinfecting stuff. Theoretically, one of the bowls has to be big enough to immerse your largest piece of equipment for disinfecting. They also test the temperature of your hot water, will only approve certain counter and floor materials, and so on. Not stuff that most people need to worry about. :)

    I've never had a disposal, always been on a septic system and mostly composted.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38585 replies465 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    A garbage disposal would have cost us $300 annually - for the hassle of calling the septic guy to do an inspection. No thanks. Apparently, one can live without a disposal just fine.
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  • sryrstresssryrstress 2511 replies9 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    I hated a disposal and took it out when I remodeled. Have never regretted that. I hated stuff falling down there, grinding silverware on accident, and the huge amount of space it took up under the sink.
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