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Changing jobs : a naive quitter or an empowered survivalist?

greenbuttongreenbutton 2669 replies120 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
How many of you have changed jobs late in life? Not for money or advancement, but for the potential of a less toxic envi onment? Or is it ridiculous to think any workplace isn't somewhat toxic?
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Replies to: Changing jobs : a naive quitter or an empowered survivalist?

  • mom2andmom2and 2857 replies19 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    It really depends on the level of "toxicity", what other options there are, and what your risk tolerance is. I know people who have jumped ship from my office and have come back in a hurry while others have found happiness (or at least more money) in a new job. A family member was downsized and took a package in part due to feeling the job had become toxic and unfulfilling. She has gotten a new job, but for less money and worse benefits.

    All jobs have some level of dysfunction and negativity. I would not say all are toxic. But my definition of toxic may be very different than yours.

    Care to share more details?
    edited June 2016
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  • eyemamomeyemamom 5428 replies79 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    What do you consider toxic? I hope no one thinks I have a toxic environment, but people have quit before. I'd say life is too short to be miserable.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78214 replies689 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Someone has to work in toxic environments, if only the clean them up (e.g. the Clean Harbors company).
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  • HImomHImom 34314 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    H mostly liked his workplace of 45 years. He did have some issues with some staff, but fortunately they transferred elsewhere (once with his assistance). He refused to apply for openings at places that were known to be "difficult" work environments, even if it meant turning down money and promotions.

    Mostly, I was OK with my work environments. They weren't perfect, but all were pretty good and mostly comfortable and supportive.

    Life is too short to endure toxic work environments long term. I believe it takes a toll on the health of the workforce.
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  • busyparentbusyparent 1003 replies43 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My friend left one govt agency for another (age 57) and is MUCH happier with the second job. It is a longer commute, but more respect, autonomy and money.
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  • thumper1thumper1 74741 replies3274 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Look for something else. It's worth taking the chance on a new job if you really can't stand this current one.
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  • katliamomkatliamom 12807 replies167 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I left a job that was costing me too much in stress and frustration. Didn't regret it for a minute -- even when I heard that less than a month later, most of the department was laid off, and would have been let go, too. So I missed out on severance pay and unemployment! And still felt good about the decision. (When you know, you know.)
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  • garlandgarland 16002 replies198 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    My H left a profession--medicine--because the stress was killing him. Now makes about a third as much, and much h happier.

    I left a midlevel administrative//advising/counseling job at a college with a sort of toxic boss, and went back to adjuncting. That serendipitously morphed into a full-time instructor job that pays about what the first job paid, but I didn't know that would happen when I left.

    Peace of mind and a reasonable stress level are much more important to us than is money.
    edited June 2016
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  • greenbuttongreenbutton 2669 replies120 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    There's no severance package for staff, so that's not an issue here. Toxic in the sense that I've been made aware of my boss' deep dislike of my personality -- not my work, my personality --- but she sees no reason we can't continue to work together successfully and seems puzzled that I would be disturbed by her assessment. Dislike deep enough to reject me for a position in favor of someone with zero experience but still expect me to train the newbie. And tell me all this.
    edited June 2016
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  • mamommamom 3674 replies24 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I stay at my job for these reasons: pension and flexibility. I could leave now and collect 84% of my retirement, but I would not feel comfortable leaving til I know where my D class of 2018 will end up in college and what the cost will be. I absolutely despise my boss. I have looked elsewhere within my company but think my age is a deterrent to hiring managers. I could look for a job at another company, but if I leave, I cannot collect my full pension til 65. If I stay I can collect at 60.
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  • VeryHappyVeryHappy 18517 replies324 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @greenbutton, if your boss really dislikes you, it's tempting to want to quit. Every day, you're walking into a situation where you know you can't win. However, if you quit, you get nothing. If there's a chance she might really misbehave and you could get something out of it -- embarrassing her, showing to management what she's really like, revenge, or even just karma -- it might be worth it to hang in there.

    When I was in my horrible, terrible toxic situation, I just kept telling myself everyday, "This is not my real life. This is temporary. In my real life, people love me and respect me This place is nuts."

    It helped. Of course, only to a certain extent.
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  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys 16629 replies66 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'm doing it right now...or trying to do it. At 60 years of age. I have high hopes that my last couple years working will be less toxic. You could be writing my story @greenbutton Whatever you decide, good wishes to you.
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  • zeebamomzeebamom 1370 replies3 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @greenbutton - been there. Left the organization last year. Actually, I was pushed out. From the start of the year I thought I could get through it or it would get better. It didn't. Things finally came to a head and I moved into a different organization at the same company at the end of last year. I am much, much less stressed and definitely happier. It was never going to get better and nothing I could do was going to change a senior manager's opinion of me. I ended up in the job my replacement had. She loves it. Go figure. Sometimes, you just have to figure out when to cut out and do it.
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  • TwicerTwicer 166 replies2 threadsRegistered User Junior Member
    Not sure how relevant the "late in life" aspect is. For those of us with 20 more years left in the workplace the light at the end of the tunnel is so much farther.
    Anyway, my story is - my workplace of 7 years became unbearable due to changes in the client organization. I moved to another project, keeping my seniority and comp. However, the new project proved even worse. While I wasn't attacked personally or humiliated too often, people around me were treated appallingly and I just could not bear it. Everyday I had to talk myself into going to the office.
    I started looking for a new job 2 months into the new project, but it was slow going even though I was willing to take a pay cut. Eventually took a new job that pays better but the title is lower. OF COURSE I was sold a bill of goods... the work pace is excruciatingly slow, and I have not "clicked" with my manager, who is also new in the organization and cannot, or won't, help me grow my own network. But everyone is nice, there is less stress, I am finding ways to use the time productively (cough CC cough), and let's not forget a steady paycheck. It certainly beats the previous projects that had a lot going on but made me physically ill.

    Bottom line, no workplace is perfect, but there are some faults we can tolerate and others that truly poison our minds and bodies. It is OK to escape a bad environment. When you know it's time to go... you know.
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  • oldfortoldfort 22942 replies290 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Last year I was very unhappy with my former company's re-org. I was there for less than a year. I aggressively looked for another job as soon as I decided I wanted to leave. I quite after I secured a compatible job, which took about 3 months. I wish I could have quite when I wanted to, but I knew the prudent thing to do was to get another job before I quite. I don't think it is wise to quite without another job.
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