right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04

The Day I Had My Heart Attack

13»

Replies to: The Day I Had My Heart Attack

  • hrh19hrh19 861 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    Thanks for sharing so many personal stories. I hate going to the doctor, but today made appointments for a physical and a mammogram. I'm only about three months overdue. Thanks for making me take action. I have been pretty healthy, but I want to be around a long time to enjoy my H, S, D, SIL, and future grandchild(ren).
    · Reply · Share
  • somemomsomemom 10856 replies324 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    As @rockvillemom says, the guy had a clean bill of health and the symptoms can be unclear, so, given where you all have been, what would you do differently if you could go back in time? What doctor would you have checked with or test would you have had?

    I actually am familiar with these stories and had an incidence of chest pain a year or two ago, called my PCP, we agreed that it did not sound serious and I would come in after the weekend. I awakened in the middle of the night feeling 'weird' and my BP was high. I normally have a very low BP & my DH's monitor was in the recycle bin for behaving oddly so I do not know if the numbers were real, but they were both too high! I ended up heading for the ED and they did rule out anything cardiac, it turned out to be that I had tried some Prilosec for a few weeks and then stopped cold turkey which results in a rebound of excess acid production. I was that person who could have been embarrassed that there was nothing wrong, but I was not, because I recall the stories and how people had been very active and had no noticeable symptoms yet still had serious things happening inside.

    Let's say everyone on this threat does what they can to improve their risk, the results: You're a good weight, you get regular exercise, you don't smoke, you eat reasonably healthy, you effectively manage stress, you get check ups, you have good lab results. Probably many people have someone who had a cardiac issue in their family history, but it could be over age 70-80. What do those people who are doing all the 'good things' do to prevent those scary MIs? If the referee just got a clean bill of health, how do we find the problems before they find us?
    · Reply · Share
  • rockymtnhighrockymtnhigh 1871 replies68 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    You just do the best you can.
    · Reply · Share
  • HImomHImom 34320 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I just had a slew of cardiac tests, including a cardiac stress test with agitated saline, so they could have a better idea of what's going on with my heart, without contrast/dye. I was glad to have a new cardiologist I believe in.
    · Reply · Share
  • rockymtnhighrockymtnhigh 1871 replies68 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    Agree @doschicos, H and I took it for work. D's took it for WFR- 'wolfers' wilderness first responders course. That was a great course. They went at about age 14 and 20 to a remote area for about a week to take the course together. It was only about an hour from here and was in the summer. I think it is taught all year different places. Babysitting classes and certification require it here,too. It is a good thing to know as a kid, a parent, and a bystander.
    edited June 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • lookingforwardlookingforward 34123 replies377 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Mine learned it for lifeguarding, had to renew every 2 years.
    · Reply · Share
  • FallGirlFallGirl 8045 replies27 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    And I for one am so glad you are still here with us, CD!

    Me too!!!!
    · Reply · Share
  • ohiopublicohiopublic 1681 replies30 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I've had one brother die of a heart attack and another with a quadruple bypass. While I am a runner, maintain a healthy lifestyle and am careful with diet, I know that I have family history working against me. Just because you have an active lifestyle doesn't mean you aren't at risk. Alberto Salazar (renowned runner/marathoner/coach) didn't have any symptoms leading up to his heart attack. He had run a marathon 7 weeks prior. His one valve had 70:80% blockage.

    From what I have been told, a stress treadmill test might not necessarily show blockage in someone that doesn't have apparent symptoms and is a highly fit individual. I have passed this easily and maintain my cholesterol under 175, etc.

    The gold standard to detect blockage is an invasive test - an angiogram catherization test. However, you aren't going to do this unless you have symptoms.

    That's why My physician had me do a Coronary Calcium scan. It is a low cost way to detect blockage. I've had two of them and I think the test cost me $150, was done at an outpatient facility in less than an hour. It might be something folks with no symptoms and family history might want to ask their physician about. http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/heart-scan/details/why-its-done/icc-20201897
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78233 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    ohiopublic wrote:
    That's why My physician had me do a Coronary Calcium scan. It is a low cost way to detect blockage. I've had two of them and I think the test cost me $150, was done at an outpatient facility in less than an hour. It might be something folks with no symptoms and family history might want to ask their physician about. http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/heart-scan/details/why-its-done/icc-20201897

    Note that the link does say that such a scan involves radiation and is not recommended for those whose risk is otherwise indicated to be very low or very high, since such cases would result in radiation exposure whose risks outweigh the likely benefit. It does suggest using it for moderate risk patients whose calculated risk of heart attack is 5% to 7.5% in the next 10 years, or when "a risk-based treatment decision is uncertain."
    edited June 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • threeofthreethreeofthree 1035 replies40 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    My husband had a cardiac event about 8 years ago or so....the doctor called it "sort of" a heart attack. He did end up w/ a stent and 3 days in the cardiology recovery area. But what I found so fascinating was the procedure they used to take a picture of the heart that clearly showed the heart with all the arteries and veins and you could see how much plaque lined the vessels. He had very good arteries with not too much plaque, nothing the doctor would have worried about, but a piece of plaque had broken off part way and remained connected at one end so it ended up becoming hinged and my husband would experience severe chest pain when he laid down, but as soon as he sat up it would go away. Laying down closed off the blood flow, sitting up opened it back up. I wonder if the reason so many of those people that have a heart attack shortly after having an excellent checkup end up jarring loose plaque off the walls with a stress test!

    That procedure could save lots of lives. If the insurance companies would pay for that every 2 to 5 years like they pay for colonoscopies every 7 to 10 years, I think we would all live longer.

    However, when I thought I was having heart issues and my doctor gave me a stress test, it was determined my heart was actually pretty good but I had developed asthma in my 50's and they gave me an inhaler!
    · Reply · Share
  • dragonmomdragonmom 5899 replies154 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @ohiopublic , thanks for that link. My DH just had that scan and couldn't articulate exactly what it measured or what it showed . Thankfully, all was good. Arrrrrgh. I guess I need to be the extra ears at all of his visits, his medical stuff is getting so complex.
    · Reply · Share
  • jym626jym626 55540 replies2895 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    The young fellow that passed away had just had a physical before the road race (he was in the military reserves and had just had an annual physical). Apparently it did not pick up his occluded arteries. However, after he passed away, his family was all evaluated and his mom, shortly thereafter, had a quadruple bypass. So his death saved his mom's life.
    · Reply · Share
  • IxnayBobIxnayBob 4414 replies42 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @jym626, my heart (no wordplay intended) goes out to that mother. I can only imagine how desperately she wishes that the life saved were her son's instead of hers.

    Maybe I'm over-emotional because the first Tesla fatality using autopilot was announced today. Joshua Brown was an EV and Tesla enthusiast. RIP.
    · Reply · Share
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 78233 replies690 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited July 2016
    I wonder if the reason so many of those people that have a heart attack shortly after having an excellent checkup end up jarring loose plaque off the walls with a stress test!

    This seems similar to the larger number of heart attacks that happen on the first snow day of winter in places where it snows. People who have not exercised for months go out and start shoveling snow off their walkways and driveways... the intense (at least for them) exercise may cause unstable plaques in their coronary arteries to rupture and cause clots or blockages.

    Regarding the scan, that seems like the calcium scan discussed in #50 and #51.
    edited July 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • poetsheartpoetsheart 5489 replies103 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Thank you TonyK and Counting Down for sharing your stories. I'm so glad to know you both survived your heart attack, not only because losing you would have been devastating for those who love you, but also because you're now able to tell your tale and thereby deliver the wake up call that may help many, many people live.

    To be honest, your stories have shaken me. I have several risk factors for heart disease, including insulin dependent diabetes (the insulin @ bedtime, added several months ago, has helped me bring my A1c back to acceptable levels), high blood pressure (well controlled by 2 different medications), and high cholesterol (LDL of 140). Oh, and I'm also C-PAP dependent, having been diagnosed with severe sleep apnea just under a year ago (family members had been trying to get me to see a sleep specialist for years, as they were concerned about the snoring, abrupt periods of silence, and snorting sounds they often overheard during my sleep).

    As it happens, my endocrinologist tried to talk me into adding a statin just a few weeks ago, but I've been pretty resistant to the idea, though H has been on one for years. I already take so many medications, some of which are rather expensive, so I find the idea of adding yet another depressing.

    A few years ago, when I was working out regularly, I experienced a scary episode on the elliptical: I experienced chest pain and lightheadedness, something that had never occurred before. When I got off the machine, sat down and drank a bit of water, the pain subsided and quickly went away. I've never had a recurrence, but then again, I've not done cardio regularly for years. Last night, I had a brief spell of mild stabbing chest pains while I lay in bed, and wondered briefly if I should be concerned. They too went away rather quickly, so I'd not thought of them again until reading this thread.

    My 82 year old father has had two by-pass surgeries. But he suffered from Rheumatic Fever in childhood, and was always told he'd likely have heart issues as an adult. Nobody else in my immediate or extended family has had a heart attack, as far as I know. Cancers aplenty, but no heart attacks. Now, I'm beginning to think I should see a cardiologist to get checked out. I suppose you can add me to your wake-up call list.
    · Reply · Share
  • HImomHImom 34320 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I've had a high resting heart rate (mid to high 90s) for at least a decade and have asked my docs and cardiologists about it. (It would zoom up to 150 or so, just walking.) None offered any treatments until in Feb 2016 a pulmonologist started me on a beta blocker WITHOUT ANY cardiac testing.

    Just came back from a series of cardiac tests (excluding the plaque one) and was switched to a new beta blocker at a 5mg dose that keeps my resting heart rate between 60s-80s and my exercising heart rate 80s-110s.

    I'm glad I now have a cardiologist that has taken an interest and is treating the high heart rate--it seems like a good idea to reduce my heart rate. The overnight holter monitor (with no beta blocker) recorded an average heart rate of 97, with NO strenuous exercise! I only wish the cardiologist weren't 4000 miles away in Denver!
    · Reply · Share
  • CountingDownCountingDown 13433 replies110 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    poetsheart, please go get checked out. You're symptomatic, and with your medical history, it is worth it to be checked out. Even if they find nothing wrong, you will still have a baseline from which to measure if you have a problem later.

    I was 51 when I had my heart attack. Never in a million years thought I would be in this boat.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity