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Neighbor's dog

kepakemapakepakemapa 31 replies16 threads Junior Member
My neighbor got a new dog. It barks very early in the morning and wakes us up. What should we do?
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Replies to: Neighbor's dog

  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 41266 replies479 threads Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    Have you tried talking with the neighbors? That would be my first step. If you have and it flew over their heads, then the next step would depend on other things...
    edited June 2016
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  • hrh19hrh19 889 replies1 threads Member
    Tell your neighbor right away. I'm sure they will want to bring their dog inside so it does not bother the neighbors.
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  • Madison85Madison85 10407 replies412 threads Senior Member
    Earplugs?
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  • pardulletpardullet 293 replies4 threads Junior Member
    Give them a puppy gift - a bark collar.
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  • saxsax 5272 replies156 threads Senior Member
    edited June 2016
    Most importantly, go meet the dog. Be nice to it. Make friends with it. Talk with your neighbors. A new dog has to be trained to not bark. "Hey, Congrats on your new dog. He's great. Can I give him a treat and make friends with him? What kind is he? How big will he get? What's his name? How long do you think it will take you to train him not to bark so much because he is waking us up?

    This is a friendly heads up.

    If he never teaches him not to bark and it continues, get out your camera or phone and tape him barking. If he barks for longer than 10 minutes then you have proof of non stop barking. Suggest to your neighbor it is a problem for you.

    If your neighbor doesn't care then you can discuss your non stop barking tape. Its so easy today to gather proof of a problem.

    Look on line for methods of teaching your dog to not bark. Copy it and hand it to your neighbor.
    edited June 2016
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  • BeeFriendlyBeeFriendly 26 replies1 threads Junior Member
    New dogs bark from nervousness. Usually they stop when they get comfortable (no help to you while you wait) but I agree with talking to neighbors about keeping the dog in the house in the am until you are up and also using ear plugs so you can get a couple of good nights of sleep. One positive thing, I had a noise sensitive new dog and I put him in the house every time I left the house and at night so he wouldn't bother the neighbors (they came to talk to me and I was very apologetic and adopted the above policy). One night he started barking at the window and the neighbor's car was getting broken into (we lived in a nice 'no crime' neighborhood at the time). We were able to call police. After that, everyone loved our dog. When he barked everyone looked to see who was around! :D
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  • TempeMomTempeMom 2970 replies25 threads Senior Member
    Agree that sometimes it takes a couple weeks for the dog to calm down. If you want to be proactive for yourself, you might also consider getting a white noise machine....amazon has the marpac which is excellent.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 41266 replies479 threads Senior Member
    New dogs might bark because they are "nervous," but this stupid behavior will not stop unless the owner interferes. Here is why the neighbor might not want to listen to you - in random order. I am not saying he will not listen, but be prepared that he might be offended if you do some of the mentioned things.

    First, the neighbor might laugh at the tape, because depending on where you live, barking dog nuisance might be simply unenforceable for multiple reasons.

    The neighbor might like the barking. Some folks can sleep through thunder (like our neighbor), and at the same time they might consider a barking dog a "security feature." (Like our neighbor does). Their dog only barks when the neighbor leaves on vacation, making it clear to the neighborhood that the house is not watched.

    Next, some people will be offended by a suggestions how they should train their pet. Some folks think anti barking devices are cruel, and dogs need to free to express their minds, yup, by barking.
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  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes 34216 replies770 threads Senior Member
    When we first adopted her, our furbaby whined (LOUDLY) when we left the house. This happened for several weeks and we didn't even know about it until a neighbor told us and we apologized profusely. Once we knew, we tried a few different things and eventually she stopped.

    I'd give the dog a little time to see if s/he calms down. Then I'd talk to the owner about it- s/he might not even know that it's loud enough to wake others up.
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  • somemomsomemom 11025 replies334 threads Senior Member
    It all depends on your neighbor's attitude, I like @sax options, kill them with kindness first so they cannot mentally mark you as an unreasonable anti-dog person, then see what you can work out.
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  • TyberiusTyberius 177 replies11 threads Junior Member
    Don't expect the dog to outgrow the barking without a lot of training. I suggest you check to see if your town or city has any anti-barking ordinances. Ours has a very strong one. Then if you are met with the response that the dog can bark as much as it wants and there is nothing you can do about it you will know what in fact you can do. It amazes me that dog owners never seem to hear their dogs bark. We have a dog that rarely barks, but when he does he is brought inside immediately.
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  • alwaysamomalwaysamom 12281 replies217 threads Senior Member
    Without knowing how long the dog is barking without the neighbor doing anything about it (and the OP did not include that information), it's difficult to give useful or accurate advice. The reality is that all dogs bark. Now, this doesn't mean that a dog should be left barking outside to annoy neighbors but you can't expect that a dog will never bark. What time of the morning is he barking? Do your neighbors leave early for work? Is he outside or inside? Every dog I have ever known, and I've never been without at least two dogs in more than 30 continuous years, has to go out first thing in the morning. If this is the case and the dog is just barking to be let back in, and not continuously while being ignored, well, there's really not much you can do about that.

    If, on the other hand, he is barking non-stop for several minutes, and the neighbor is ignoring him, then it's time to say something to the neighbor. The other thing you might want to investigate would be the noise by-laws in your town. We have fairly strong by-laws where I live but unless it's continuous outside long-term barking, nothing would be done. It's similar to construction noise, which is also governed by by-law and which is allowed, given restricted decibels, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
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  • mathmommathmom 33186 replies161 threads Senior Member
    I'd definitely research whatever noise ordinances your town has, but I agree with trying to be nice first. You can definitely train a dog to only bark for good reasons.
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  • eastcoascrazyeastcoascrazy 2603 replies22 threads Senior Member
    Following this thread!

    New rescue oldish puppy across the street. Nice, friendly guy, going to be biggish, has labrador (big, webbed) feet.

    Serious barking, howling, yapping issues at the moment. The dog has been there for a couple of weeks, but the noticeable barking just started this week. They put him out in the fenced back yard when they leave (nanny takes kids to the local pool, etc.) Yesterday I timed him. He barked for 50 minutes straight.

    I haven't decided what to do about it. It isn't all that disturbing to me personally unless I am outside, but the dog is not happy alone in the back yard.

    There were issues with their previous dog, who had separation anxiety. THAT dog (80 pound hound) howled if left alone to the point the neighbors stopped hearing it. It was like living under a flight path. The poor dog panicked and broke out of a second floor window onto their roof. Another time it panicked while home alone during a hellacious thunderstorm, broke out of the house and got a hind leg caught on the top of a retaining wall fence trying to jump it. Hung upside down for a couple of hours until a neighbor finally went out in the middle of the storm because the howling seemed odd, even for that dog. Once upon a time, when my youngest was in middle school and we didn't know the extent of the howler's problems, they hired her to watch their dog while they were on vacation. Half a page of vague instructions, which she followed. But the dog relieved himself on an upstairs carpet between the last time she looked in on the dog and the time the owner arrived. He accidentally texted my daughter instead of his wife about what a terrible job she had done. LOL, my daughter texted him back and said, "This is the dog sitter, I think you meant to text someone else." Not a single word was ever spoken about it.

    The howler finally died this spring after breaking out yet again, running through a highway fence and getting hit by a car.

    My point being, I'm not sure the neighbor is going to listen to anyone, and especially not to anyone in my family.
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  • eastcoascrazyeastcoascrazy 2603 replies22 threads Senior Member
    Thanks for the opportunity to vent!
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  • somemomsomemom 11025 replies334 threads Senior Member
    I have a dog who is very territorial, he has to bark at raccoons and coyotes and other critters plus observe all cars. I will admit to being much more careful about the timing of letting him out when our part time neighbors are in their place, if no one is around, I don't care if he barks along the fence line for a few minutes (not many people on our street!)
    My daughter really notices his barking, so I am more restrictive of him when she is home
    He will never stop wanting to patrol, sometimes I indulge him, sometimes I don't. I am a good neighbor, if someone on my street said, hey we are in bed by 9PM, or we are sleeping until 9AM on the weekends or something specific, I would definitely observe, it. YMMV
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  • MotherOfDragonsMotherOfDragons 3934 replies25 threads Senior Member
    Most municipalities have nuisance dog barking laws, but I'd try talking to the neighbors first.

    Once, our barky old poodle snuck out onto the back porch and barked like a maniac. We couldn't hear her because we were watching a very loud movie in the basement. We could hear the doorbell, though (routed down there), and it was the next door neighbor. He was like, is your dog ok? She's been barking for an hour! We were like, oh, man, we didn't know-so sorry!

    A lot of it is in the delivery.
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  • OnwardOnward 2970 replies82 threads Senior Member
    Are your neighbors shoving the dog out in the morning to take care of business while they get ready for work? If so, they need to get up early and go out with the dog. The poor thing is ready to socialize a bit in the morning.
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