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The Responsibility of Police Officers

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Replies to: The Responsibility of Police Officers

  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang 19958 replies164 threads Senior Member
    yourmomma wrote:
    You may want to look at what the police actually do. They don't just "patrol the schools" and go home. They actually do go on regular old get the bad guy duty as well.

    I'd like to look into it, @yourmomma, so perhaps you can provide me with a cite or two about what school resource officers do in Florida. I figured the school resource officer for an upscale suburban high school would be stationed at the school, not handling drug shootouts in sleazy neighborhoods.
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  • milee30milee30 2918 replies19 threads Senior Member
    "I'd like to look into it, @yourmomma, so perhaps you can provide me with a cite or two about what school resource officers do in Florida. I figured the school resource officer for an upscale suburban high school would be stationed at the school, not handling drug shootouts in sleazy neighborhoods."

    You're correct about what SROs do in our part of Florida and from what I have read about Broward as well. An SRO is assigned full time to a school and spends his/her entire day at that school, not on general patrol. There are a few cases where two schools share an SRO, but the SRO is only splitting time between schools, not some school time and some general patrol time.

    My son's high school has an SRO and while I like the guy, I think it's a huge waste of resources to spend $100k (fully loaded cost including benefits) to have a full time Deputy at the school. It's a magnet school drawing from a relatively affluent and low crime area, so arrests are extremely rare. The SRO spends his days patrolling the campus and putting on special programs such as drug prevention and safety programs. For the once a year when the school has a situation requiring a Deputy, I have no idea why it wouldn't be a lot more cost efficient to just call 911, especially given that the school is located literally right next to the main Sheriff's Depot in the area. Yes, the school and Sheriff's Depot share a fence they are that close.

    The only possible justification that makes sense to me for having a full time SRO on campus is to address unfolding and ongoing violence, such as a school shooter situation. So yes, if my son's school had a shooting situation, I would expect the SRO to engage and address that situation.
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  • doschicosdoschicos 26838 replies269 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    A big portion of the SRO job is to have a presence in the high school and build a rapport with students. Cop = someone you can trust and talk to. Educating, mentoring, building positive relationships. It's not all about defending the school and enforcing.

    http://www.policefoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/PF_IssueBriefs_Defining-the-Role-of-School-Based-Police-Officers_FINAL.pdf
    edited February 2018
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  • MassDaD68MassDaD68 1524 replies24 threads Senior Member
    I know everyone would like to point a finger at this guy but we need to figure out what the proper procedure is. I know the Sheriff said it was wrong, but what are they actually taught to do? It seems to me that police generally wait for back up. I doubt it is as simple as if you hear shots, you run in firing your weapon.

    Police nowadays have an impossible job. Some want them to shot first and ask questions later and others want them to talk it out first.

    They are checking into what should be done now and we should hear soon.
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  • milee30milee30 2918 replies19 threads Senior Member
    According to the two articles linked earlier in the thread, the gold standard of response is not to wait for back up, but to go in as soon as possible to address the situation. Sad lesson learned from Columbine.

    Here are the two articles describing the gold standard response:

    https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/15/us/florida-school-shooting-columbine-lessons/index.html

    https://www.npr.org/2012/07/21/157154275/how-columbine-shaped-police-response-to-shootings
    Might be worth checking to see which agencies have not done this type of training...
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  • GloriaVaughnGloriaVaughn 548 replies1 threads Member
    @Cardinal Fang "Police officers nowadays are specifically trained to save themselves first." You source is???
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  • GloriaVaughnGloriaVaughn 548 replies1 threads Member
    To Serve and Protect is the motto of just about every police department in the country. There are more Chicago policemen killed off duty then on duty. Then again they are trained that they are never really off duty. The officer stationed at the school was wrong. Other officers from that department are now being investigated since the chief of another police department informed them of what his men observed. He has now opened himself up to lawsuits from the parents.
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  • yourmommayourmomma 1323 replies1 threads Senior Member
    "I'd like to look into it, @yourmomma, so perhaps you can provide me with a cite or two about what school resource officers do in Florida. I figured the school resource officer for an upscale suburban high school would be stationed at the school, not handling drug shootouts in sleazy neighborhoods."

    You're correct about what SROs do in our part of Florida and from what I have read about Broward as well. An SRO is assigned full time to a school and spends his/her entire day at that school, not on general patrol. There are a few cases where two schools share an SRO, but the SRO is only splitting time between schools, not some school time and some general patrol time.

    You can look up various intergovernmental agreements online regard SROs. But do realize, school is in session, what 180 days/year or thereabouts? So these police do other things as well. The one at the HS in the next town does the weekend night shift, breaking up parties and such -- don't ask me how I know. :)
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  • yourmommayourmomma 1323 replies1 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    The gun most commonly used in school shootings (unlike handguns in other crimes) has an effective fire rate of 120 bullets per minute, and causes immensely more tisue damage than other guns. I doubt there was much time to make a difference.

    Just another data point. This is from the Conn. General Assembly. A lot of handguns on the list -- 36 out of 49.
    https://www.cga.ct.gov/2013/rpt/2013-R-0057.htm

    Which begs the question. Did the Deputy even know what kid of gun was being used? I want to hear the dispatch tapes to see what really happened.
    edited February 2018
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  • conmamaconmama 5004 replies352 threads Senior Member
    @anomander ...to your point, survival is the strongest instinct of human beings.
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  • IgloooIglooo 9248 replies227 threads Senior Member
    If Cruz was still shooting at the time, I don't know how anyone can forgive the deputy not following the protocol for fear of his safety. Trade a kid's life for his safety? He was in less danger than kids. He had protective gear.
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  • doschicosdoschicos 26838 replies269 threads Senior Member
    Do we know exactly what gear the SRO had?
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  • GloriaVaughnGloriaVaughn 548 replies1 threads Member
    Most police departments use a Glock.
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  • sherpasherpa 4917 replies98 threads Senior Member
    There are two sides to every story and, through his attorney, the disgraced SRO is starting to tell his. I'm tempted to copy/paste parts of the statement, but it really needs to be read in full.

    http://time.com/5176090/scot-peterson-not-coward-parkland-cop/
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  • busdriver11busdriver11 15424 replies29 threads Senior Member
    If the details provided by the officer in sherpa's story as provided by the police officer are accurate, it sounds like he did exactly what he was supposed to. It is unfair for anyone to jump to conclusions, particularly his superior officer, who should let the investigation unfold.
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  • doschicosdoschicos 26838 replies269 threads Senior Member
    Ok. Say he was armed with a glock. Do we know what kind of protective gear he might have had. Do SROs go to work everyday in SWAT gear? Do we even know for a fact he was wearing a bullet proof vest?
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  • ConsolationConsolation 22898 replies184 threads Senior Member
    @doschicos , I don't care what kind of gear he had. He had training, and a gun. The kids and their teachers had nothing. Nothing at all.
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  • doschicosdoschicos 26838 replies269 threads Senior Member
    edited February 2018
    Did you read the post above #54 , @Consolation, with the link to Peterson's lawyers statement and a timeline from their side of the story? Who knows what the truth is right now. I'll withhold judgment until more facts come out, if they come out. Details are very scarce right now about what happened in those several minutes. Right now I don't think anyone here has enough info to make an educated judgment either way.
    edited February 2018
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  • ConsolationConsolation 22898 replies184 threads Senior Member
    Yeah, I read it. I think it is BS.

    It is also BS when people like Trump claim that they would have done better.

    We know who would have acted. There is plenty of history and plenty of evidence.

    Mothers, not chickenhawks.
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