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2019 Gardening Thread

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Replies to: 2019 Gardening Thread

  • Bromfield2Bromfield2 3558 replies35 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @greenwitch Great idea! I do grow some hot peppers in pots—all on my deck because it is the sunniest place. So cool that you have a long growing season.

    @abaset Try growing Serrano peppers; they are a step above jalapeños on the Scoville Scale (measure if the heat of a chili pepper). It is a green pepper. Slightly milder than Serrano is an Anaheim pepper—it is long slender green pepper. (It is good to use for stuffed pepper recipes.) A really pretty red pepper plant is the Thai Chili pepper. It is quite hot—you can dry it and use the seeds for red pepper flakes.
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  • abasketabasket 19193 replies854 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^^ THANK YOU!

    Looked up the Scoville scale - very interesting and helpful!
    https://pepperjoe.com/pages/hot-pepper-heat-scale
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  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom 10162 replies202 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited April 30
    Here's another, more detailed list of peppers by Scoville scale.
    http://ushotstuff.com/Heat.Scale.htm

    I'm a wimp. I only grow Big Jims, Sandias and Anchos. There are all kinds of hotter peppers at the farmer's markets. And in the fall, you can buy 40 lb sacks of chiles everywhere, including all the local supermarkets (which set up propane roasters in the parking lot. The price of your sack include roasting.) The sacks are labeled mild, medium, hot, X-hot and XXX-hot.
    edited April 30
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  • abasketabasket 19193 replies854 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    We have had such a lousy spring. Cold, wet, little sun. Every time we think we are turning a corner, we're not!

    I've been doing lots of yard work and clearing flower beds and planting the many pots I have for annuals. The seeds I planted in my raised bed are very SLOW. The radishes are a couple inches tall after 3 weeks. Zinnia seeds are sprouting. Lettuce and beets seeds are a no show so far. Just no/little sun!

    I bought my other veggie plants this weekend and vowed to get them all planted this week - but we will be out of town for the long weekend...I decided tonight to not worry about it and just get them in next week. Temps are still only at best in the 60's and lots of clouds and rain in the forecast...I think my garden - and many others - are just going to be late this year!
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33560 replies367 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Last year, I stumbled across "Eight-Ball Zucchini." Whole Foods has them right now. Even if you're set for zuccs this year or not growing them, worth looking into. They grow round balls and are so fresh tasting. I wedge them and lightly fry.

    Re: "potting soil." The issue with some mixes is they can run too hot for whatever plant or veggie it is. You do have to check what's right for yours.
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  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom 10162 replies202 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    edited May 24
    One plus to the late, wet spring---butterflies!

    (There was fresh snow falling in the foothills just above my house Monday night thru Wednesday morning. Taos ski area got 4 feet of new snow this week and both Taos and Purgatory have opened for skiing over over Memorial Day for the first time in history.)

    My backyard is absolutely swarming with Monarch and Painted Lady butterflies--something I've never seen before because they typically don't migrate through my locale because it's too dry.
    edited May 24
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  • Midwest67Midwest67 2961 replies12 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I am overwhelmed by our yard.

    Specifically, keeping the perennial flower beds free of climbing vines, invasive morning glory, tree saplings, violets, garlic mustard, and GRASS.

    The grass is quickly invading an expanse of daylilies and is starting to grow in the periwinkle bed and getting to my coneflowers.

    I was out there today pulling a bunch of the grass out by hand bc the soil is wet and it was coming up without too much difficulty. Not getting it all, of course.

    The grass root system though...gulp...it’s a vast underground network....I think it’s just going to come back.

    Any tips or success stories?
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  • sryrstresssryrstress 2515 replies9 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @midwest67 Painting Round-up on the grass with a foam brush will work. I'm not that patient and have far too large a yard. So...I spray very carefully and am willing to sacrifice a couple of nearby plants to kill the grass. Then I cut it off at ground level and cover with a little bit of mulch.
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  • abasketabasket 19193 replies854 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'll second that grass in flower beds is a pain in the you-know-what. Of course it doesn't pull nicely - as you said @Midwest67 , it seems to get a solid root system quick. Maybe I'll trial the painting with a foam brush in a small area and see what happens.
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  • Midwest67Midwest67 2961 replies12 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @sryrstress

    Same. I'm not going to be patient enough and the yard is .... too much for one person.

    Maybe I can rig a piece of cardboard or something to act as a shield for the perennials while I spray. Then, if needed, break out the foam brush.

    I would not have thought of using a brush. Thank you for the suggestion.
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  • Midwest67Midwest67 2961 replies12 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I cleaned out two of our raised garden beds of weeds, weeds, weeds. I planted four tomato plants in one. I planted corn seed in the second. We will never see an ear of corn to actually eat (bugs, raccoons), but I LOVE corn plants.

    The asparagus bed is a wreck. There are raspberry plants back there in the jungle. I will get to it, bit by bit.

    Gardening was way more fun when the kids lived at home and we'd spend time out there together. Oh, I used to cook then too.

    Yesterday, I also managed to plant some herbs in clay pots by the back door. It looks nice. And, optimistic. :-)

    In one flower bed, there seems to be a terrier-shaped bald spot. Hmmmm......
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38748 replies467 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Use the concentrated stuff for painting. Do not dilute. We successfully eradicated a jungle of blackberries by cutting them and painting the "stumps" with concentrated stuff. It kills the root. We use cheapo small paintbrushes from HD.
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  • greenwitchgreenwitch 8725 replies41 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Turf grass is bred to spread by underground runners and be impossible to kill. We become a victim of it's own success! The best thing is to have a barrier that goes down several inches so you're not constantly having to pick out the runners of grass. I used to go crazy with a beaucolic looking rock border that did little to keep the grass out of grape hyacinth bulbs.

    Of course, grass will die if you smother it with cardboard, newspaper, compost, wood chips, and mulch, in which ever order you prefer, but it takes months. And you still have the problem of the edge. Try to fix the edge problem.

    I agree with BB that you can use the concentrate on stumps for difficult plants. It's usually Triclopyr (brush be gone) and not glyphsophate (round up). This stuff is generally better on vines too. You can try coiling up a handful of morning glory/bindweed and stuffing it in a ziploc bag. Spray inside the bag with your herbicide and zip it shut. THat way it won't drip it's deadly stuff on its neighbors. Leave it there to rot, still attached to the root, of course, and hopefully it will kill the whole plant. You have to be more persistent than those buggers!
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  • abasketabasket 19193 replies854 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    ^ You are right that I have better luck when I take a shovel and just break the soil all along the edge a few inches deep than another garden that has a brick border - the break in the soil barrier helps.
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  • Midwest67Midwest67 2961 replies12 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @greenwitch

    Re-digging the lawn edging in the front yard? Yes, need to do that.

    The backyard? There is no lawn. It’s wood pile, perennial beds, raised garden beds. Sadly, 2/3 neglected.

    The invasive runner grass & vines are the biggest problem. I’m going to get the upper hand this year!

    ....I hope. My life is whack-a-mole.
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  • HouseChatteHouseChatte 647 replies1 threadsRegistered User Member
    Zone 5 here, and I got an email this morning that my container rose tree has shipped. In a race to get the container before rose gets here, but that's what worries me. My impression is I'm supposed to winter it someplace cold but sheltered, like a shed or garage, but it gets below freezing here. Is that a problem for terra cotta, which is my default type of pot? How do I handle that? Should I get different material container?
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38748 replies467 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Get a fiberglass or a polymeric container. They are so much lighter than clay and don't disintegrate as fast.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33560 replies367 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Per an old comment by Martha Stewart, the issue with terra cotta cracking is moisture, the freeze-thaw cycle that can repeat over winter. I don't think I'd be so concerned about a garage. But it's often enough just to pull a pot up next to the house foundation.

    But for a rose, something not edible, sure, why not BB's suggestion? Or, if you want a larger decorative (and more $) pot, how about the wheelie trays that allow you to move it without picking it up?

    (Left outdoors all year, the plastic sort does get brittle.)
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  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom 10162 replies202 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Any suggestions on how to get rid of pyracathus?

    The city planted in the public space on the other side of my back wall and the nasty stuff has sent out runners into my yard. It's popping up all over the place. Digging it all up is more than I want to do, especially since its an a steep hill slope.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33560 replies367 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I think it's the same issue with runners and breaking them up with a spade (along the wall) or blocking them with some barrier that reaches deep enough below ground level nterrupts that running. We've got this issue with Lily of the Valley, which I do like.
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