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Walmart sued over displaying homeopathic treatments ..

sorghumsorghum 3494 replies109 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,603 Senior Member
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Replies to: Walmart sued over displaying homeopathic treatments ..

  • MWolfMWolf 1142 replies8 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,150 Senior Member
    Silly Walmart, most of the willfully ignorant shop for their snake oil at much more upscale stores.
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  • MarianMarian 13163 replies83 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 13,246 Senior Member
    It's not just willful ignorance that's the problem. Because homeopathic remedies are shelved with the legitimate ones, it's entirely possible to buy them by accident.

    I bought homeopathic earwax drops by mistake once. I was in a hurry, and I grabbed the first package I saw on the shelf. When I got home and looked at the package directions, I realized that I had made a mistake and wasted my money. But I write about health for a living. I know what homeopathic means. How many consumers don't?
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  • JustaMomJustaMom 2644 replies94 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,738 Senior Member
    I’ve had positive results from many homeopathic remedies, and several allopathic remedies that didn’t help at all. Depending on the ailment I may actually reach for homeopathy first.
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  • SybyllaSybylla 3391 replies34 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,425 Senior Member
    The thing is, the placebo effect is real. That is what we really need to tap into. Mind over matter is possibly creating a biologic response. Homeopathy is laughable for sure, but we can create our own placebos, for free.
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  • sorghumsorghum 3494 replies109 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,603 Senior Member
    There aren’t studies on homeopathic meds because there isn’t any money involved by big pharma.

    Some people are making plenty money selling water in the form of homeopathic meds.

    If there was a combination of sense and money in it, big pharma would be all in too.
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  • MarianMarian 13163 replies83 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 13,246 Senior Member
    The placebo effect doesn't require placebos.

    The beneficial effect you get from a drug with real therapeutic effects is a combination of the drug's specific effect and the placebo effect. This is why new drugs are tested against placebos if it's ethically possible. Often, both the new drug and the placebo will produce improvements in symptoms -- that's the placebo effect. If the new drug has a specific activity that goes beyond the placebo effect, it will work better than the placebo. But notice that the placebo effect happens with both products.
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  • GreymeerGreymeer 698 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 707 Member
    "homeopathic" means the same as "biodegradable". All synonyms for "does not work".
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  • sorghumsorghum 3494 replies109 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,603 Senior Member
    I know how low the doses are but I’ve studied some on these and I’m not discounting their use.

    What do you think of the zero molecules in aqueous solution dosages?
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5553 replies88 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 5,641 Senior Member
    1) The placebo effect is incredibly real and studies are being done on it at such no name places as Harvard.

    https://www.health.harvard.edu/mental-health/the-power-of-the-placebo-effect

    For certain things like pain, it's being thought that trying a placebo first can be a great idea.

    2) Many homeopathic remedies do work and when they show that they are possible, many are also tested. It's how we can get some of our prescription meds when they take the specific factor that seems to do the job and sift it out. For folks who can't afford prescriptions or who don't react well to them, sometimes the natural source isn't as harsh on the body.

    3) I always recommend that folks use google to check out anything they want to try, then keep their reading limited to reputable sources like Mayo or Harvard, etc. Don't pick "Aunt Matilda's Homeopathic Cure Alls." For a non-advertisement magazine, Nutrition Action is awesome. It's small, easily readable, and stays abreast of many of the studies out there letting readers know what seems to work, what doesn't, and what's still in the testing phases (which are most things TBH). It also goes deeper into media stories. It's good for the lay reader and my med school lad reads it regularly to stay up on current things.

    Saying all homeopathic substances don't work is a myth. Saying all homeopathic remedies work is a myth. It doesn't take long to truly do one's homework and if something is still in the testing phase, make your own judgment for your own body as to whether you want to try it or not. Most of us can't wait until there are "final" answers.

    I end up eliminating most I research, but milk thistle for my liver - only bought from a reputable source of which there aren't many - research that too, Consumer Labs is a terrific source but one has to pay for it - and ginger to see if it will mimic statins since my body didn't react well to them are two I'm opting to try. The ginger will be measurable pro/con in Sept. I'll try more statins if it didn't work. The milk thistle I'll likely never know for sure about, but I already know my bilirubin tested slightly high every single time I had my blood tested before I started taking it and has been perfectly in the normal range never venturing high after. I'm keeping it and I doubt it's the placebo effect for that one.

    YMMV

    I'll also add that my med school lad had a course on homeopathic remedies at med school. They were certainly never taught that all of them are bad. They discussed some of the current studies about promising ones.
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  • garlandgarland 15872 replies197 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16,069 Senior Member
    Right: it's the "the more it's diluted, the more it works" part that seems particularly egregious.
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  • one+twoone+two 95 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 101 Junior Member
    edited May 23
    I bought homeopathic earwax drops by mistake once. I was in a hurry, and I grabbed the first package I saw on the shelf. When I got home and looked at the package directions, I realized that I had made a mistake and wasted my money.

    I'm curious -- what are homeopathic earwax drops? My Nurse Practitioner recommends using olive oil or saline water to loosen earwax before I come to her for removal with warm water squirted in the ear. Are these not homeopathic? Is the problem that it's sold as earwax drops but doesn't contain something else "mediciney"?
    edited May 23
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  • garlandgarland 15872 replies197 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 16,069 Senior Member
    I thought homeopathic had a specific meaning. Of course there are often effective home remedies and store items that are not "mediciney," but that doesn't make them homeopathic.
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