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White man calls police on black man waiting for a friend in apartment building

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Replies to: White man calls police on black man waiting for a friend in apartment building

  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2813 replies36 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Adults innocently helping what they believe are children in distress have been accused of all sorts of nefarious things, and police may treat them as guilty until proven innocent. Parents are rarely grateful. I'm not at all surprised if people would not get involved now.
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  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 12633 replies232 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Sure, but on a crowded subway where people saw what happened? Honestly i think you're way to pessimistic about people.

    There have been lots of positive public transit rescue stories, bystanders getting involved - and hurt - protecting others. not even kids.

    I also feel that "The utter loss of community is one of the saddest consequences of the politically charged environment" - suggests the environment came out of nothing important and is in and of itself to blame. There are good reasons the environment is changing, and people are questioning their first reactions to events.
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  • iaparentiaparent 266 replies2 postsRegistered User Junior Member
    @OHMomof2 My wife just ran into a similar situation and I was left watching from afar knowing I could be of no help. We were at our private neighborhood swimming pool and a cute little girl, about 5 years old had been running around us fairly unattended. My wife had talked to her, entertained her a bit and was just being generally friendly to a happy child. My wife noticed the girl was missing an earring and helped her look for it. It was no where to be found so she suggested they check with the pool office and the lost and found. They took off across the pool deck to the office. Suddenly the inattentive mother saw her daughter heading towards the exit (right next to the office) with someone she didn't know and freaked out (rightfully so). She took off running and screaming about an abduction.

    Thankfully we have been members of this pool for 15 years and are very well known by the bulk of the members. Both of our children work there and all of the employees know us as well so the situation was easily explained.

    When my wife got back to me I told her what I saw and that I could see it coming, just did not have the time/ability to act. I can safely say my wife and I will now be very hesitant to help in a less "familiar environment" because of the potential legal/social implications that could come with trying to be a good samaritan.
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2813 replies36 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Exactly. There are many of us who have had similar experiences. And if this happens to rather harmless looking middle aged women of middle class appearance, can you imagine how much more likely it is to occur if the good Samaritan is male? I would never recommend a male assist a distressed child, just not worth the questions. Maybe at most make a phone call to the police.
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  • MomofJandLMomofJandL 1590 replies30 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    She took off running and screaming about an abduction.
    "Frantic Fran white woman accuses another white woman of abduction" White people calling police on white people engaged in normal behavior?
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  • HImomHImom 34100 replies389 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    It is unfortunate but generally females are more likely to be able to assist children in need without being accused of nefarias intentions than males. With that in mind, when we find a young person who seems unsupervised/loosely supervised and I'm with H, it will be me who approaches said child. Generally neither the child nor the adults perceive me as threatening as they may a male and I've helped soothe some distressed kids. It's unfortunate that there are adults who don't keep an eye on their kids and that people who try to help lost/distressed young people are sometimes accused of abduction and worse. I understand why, but it's still unfortunate.
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  • roycroftmomroycroftmom 2813 replies36 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    Since several middle aged women on this thread have apparently been perceived as threatening in innocent situations, it seems like a risky proposition to assist these days. Many people either can not or will not accurately assess risk, and we can not even discuss it as a society openly, so if we are all suspect no one will get involved. In the OP, it is highly unlikely the man was stopped solely due to his race. It may have played a part, we do not know. But large factors also would have been his gender, age, and the lack of accompanying children/elderly with him. Crimes are greatly disproportionately committed by men between age 15 and 35 who do not bring their kids or parents along on their crime spree. We don't like to acknowledge that.
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  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 12633 replies232 postsRegistered User Senior Member
    And if this happens to rather harmless looking middle aged women of middle class appearance, can you imagine how much more likely it is to occur if the good Samaritan is male?

    Or not white.
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