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Missing hikers in the news.

2

Replies to: Missing hikers in the news.

  • natty1988natty1988 636 replies8 threadsRegistered User Member
    @tx5athome I agree that you do get oddballs in rural remote areas. People who are trying to run from something, people who want to do what they want, etc.
    One problem in rural areas is a lack of law enforcement. There was an article I read that said in some areas of rural California people have to wait hours for police to show up. And some areas get no police coverage at certain times of day and night...

    Here's the link:
    https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/article230045209.html

    Glad the woman was found, but there are some things in the story that don't add up..
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  • momsquadmomsquad 1097 replies64 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    What is clear is that your chance of survival increases greatly if you have a team of concerned and well funded friends and family involved in the search. Amanda Eller was found after more than 2 weeks lost in a Maui forest, only because her friends paid for extended helicopter searches. The most recent search amped up considerably once the well connected (son is an ER physician at UCLA) friends and family began a social media campaign to pressure authorities. It even made the nightly news on most networks, unheard of for your typical lost hiker. So many just disappear into the wilderness and are never found, or their remains are found years later.

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  • eyemamomeyemamom 5421 replies79 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    That woman from Hawaii comes from my area. The woman with the dog seems weird. Her husband was parking and this all went down that quickly?
    Apparently everyone is becoming a hiker. I thought that picture of the peak of Mt Everest being standing room only was a fake.
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  • HImomHImom 34201 replies391 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Yes, in HI we have very frequent lost people—some turn up alive, some dead, some never found. Hikes can have misadventures. Sometimes the hikers get lost, sometimes injuries, sometimes misstep and fall/slide into danger.
    They may also get too close to someone's illegal crop of whatever and ——-.
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  • TatinGTatinG 6380 replies113 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Regarding other violent attacks - I was referring to what I've heard in the news about the Sierra. Since I wrote, I recalled that an AT hiker was stabbed to death this spring by someone on the trail. This attacker had been observed by other AT hikers as being crazy and threatening before the attack and word had gone out through the AT grapevine to be on the lookout for him. And years ago, there were two women stabbed to death in their tent on the AT not too far from Big Meadow in Shenandoah IIRC.
    I wonder if there were other campers at Bristle Cone Pine saw a strange person with a knife.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38751 replies467 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Speaking of odd characters capable of attackig in remote areas, this story comes to mind.

    https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/story/21925755/kauai-man-pleads-not-guilty-in-attack-on-japanese-tourist/

    This area of Kauai is as pristine and remote as it gets... yet this poor woman encountered this individual who attacked her (yes, there are squatters who live in the valley off the end of the trail).
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5754 replies89 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    It's always interesting just how "dangerous" our rural areas are. :) Personally, I worry a lot less about my lads when they are hiking than when they are on the beltway around the big cities. Serious crime (murder) and even (very) lost folks are rare around us. Car accidents, often deadly, happen daily and those who die don't have to be the ones at fault.

    Interestingly enough... seems many of the hiking accidents/lost situations come from city folks, so yes, thinking they are more experienced than they are is probably a thing. It helps to grow up respecting nature from the beginning.

    Around here, we pair crime and "weird characters" up with the city. I walk around at night with no fear whatsoever. It's terrific looking at the Milky Way at night with nothing but the sound of critters around. Firefly season (mostly June) looks like nature's own lit Christmas trees with thousands all around.
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  • TatinGTatinG 6380 replies113 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    True. Compared to walking around a big city, the chance of being the victim of a crime walking in rural areas is much, much less.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38751 replies467 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I am not saying that remote areas are inherently dangerous because odd elements could lurking there. I am saying that encounters with dangerous individuals do happen at times, so the woman's story is not completely incredible.

    BTW, we hiked the Kalalau trail a week before the attack on the Japanese tourist happened. It is a beautiful area and yes, the trail is challenging and there are no phone service or any access to most the other than on foot or by a helicopter.
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5754 replies89 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    We've hiked the Kalalau Trail, parts of the AT (including where the hikers were killed), unknown numbers of other trails in oodles of places, and driven on the roads/highways where many have lost their lives multiple times. We scuba dive, fly, and do plenty of other things many people are scared of. Bad things happen all over. We refuse to let fear stop us from living. We'd rather die young and truly live than grow into old age having done absolutely nothing.

    That said, we still wear seat belts and never use our cell phones while driving. Those two simple things give us better odds of living longer than stopping pretty much anything else. Tons of people scared to go hiking (or whatever) think nothing of being on their cell phone behind the wheel.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38751 replies467 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    So you are maintaining that it is completely implausible that the woman was lost became of an encounter with a lurker?
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5754 replies89 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    @BunsenBurner Are you asking my thoughts? I'd go with improbable, but who knows? I assume those looking into it can get to the bottom of it.

    Evil people are out there - one only needs to watch the news to see that. I just disagree that most are in rural areas. I suspect the actual stats are probably similar (fewer incidents in the country than in cities, but fewer people too). I'm just guessing about the stats - too lazy to even try to google.

    I know people tend to feel "safe" in the US, but if one looks at statistics, we're one of the most dangerous first world countries. I've used those stats a fair number of times when people tell me they're scared we're heading to ____. H even told some folks, "Yes, please pray for us - we need to leave and return via Philadelphia, PA" then gave them the stats for that city vs Jordan (Amman was ancient Philadelphia). We were much safer statistically in Amman and enjoyed walking through their version of Central Park at night (and walked there through the city from our host family's house). I doubt I would do that in many areas of Philly at night.

    Some day something bad might happen to us if we encounter one of those evil beings. It could happen anywhere. Such will be life. I refer back to the "rather live and die young than grow into old age having done absolutely nothing" bit I typed earlier.
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  • MomofJandLMomofJandL 1603 replies31 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I'm in the improbable camp as well. More likely than not that something different was going on. But she could be telling the truth.
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  • greenwitchgreenwitch 8725 replies41 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I remember hearing recently about a woman who went on a short solo hike in Arizona or Utah, and she slipped somehow and broke an ankle. Things like that can happen, and suddenly it's getting dark and you have no phone signal, you're running out of water, and you're in a remote place.

    She managed to survive and a rescue team found her a few days later when she failed to check out of her hotel. The amazing thing is that she blamed a young man who had taken a restaurant reservation for her, for not sending out a rescue team earlier. She thought that because she had been a no show at her dinner reservation that someone would have been sent to look for her! She had been chatting with the clerk about her planned hike and she held him responsible. To me, it is not like when you sign a visitor log at the trailhead and the ranger looks at it to see if anyone is stuck on the path.

    I think that not enough people have a good imagination for disaster.
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5754 replies89 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    She thought that because she had been a no show at her dinner reservation that someone would have been sent to look for her!

    I'm trying to imagine life if every no show to a reservation has to have an APB put out on them...

    It's crazy what some people think will happen! She can't have ever worked at a restaurant.
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  • natty1988natty1988 636 replies8 threadsRegistered User Member
    People need to use common sense. Let people know where you're going and when you expect to be back. If you haven't camped or hiked or mountain climbed before don't go hiking in the remote wilderness the first time you ever experience the great outdoors. My stepfather is very outdoorsy and he's hiked, skied, backpacked, camped and climbed mountains for years and he still never goes into the remote wilderness by himself...
    Also, I wouldn't say most rural areas are dangerous. I think the main problem is that law enforcement is usually so far away and spread out in rural areas. It could take the police or ambulance several hours to reach you, if you're in trouble in a remote area. Which is what was mentioned in the article I linked. Also, if I was a weirdo or criminal and I wanted to hide out, I'd go somewhere remote. Or if I wanted to grow illegal marijuana, I'd go to the forests of Humboldt County (nowadays Marijuana is legal in CA)...
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  • CreeklandCreekland 5754 replies89 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    if I was a weirdo or criminal and I wanted to hide out, I'd go somewhere remote.

    Because it's somehow easier to hide where everyone knows who everyone else is and recognizes a stranger immediately - often starting to ask who they are, etc?

    When we travel on the back roads (our preference for travel) we love stopping in local restaurants we find. More than once everyone else eating has turned to look at us. More than once the waitress has asked us who we came to visit or what brought us to town. We've even had several owners/chefs bring us out their specialty in person or come out later to ask us how we liked it. Fortunately, my lads liked a lot of different foods and found trying new stuff as interesting as we do.

    Weirdos get talked about a lot too in rural areas. They may not be run out of town anymore, but acceptance isn't always there as it is elsewhere.

    It's easier to hide in a city IMO.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 33562 replies367 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    If I went to pee in the bushes and encountered a strange guy- and my husband only needed 7 minutes to drive to a parking spot and walk back- I'd run toward my husband.

    But a lot of people who seek out a remote area to live in are not out to cause trouble.
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  • sevmomsevmom 8383 replies55 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Are there any alerts put out in that area to be on the lookout for this alleged perpetrator? What is being done by authorities to track down this person? If they are not going full stop on trying to find this guy, I would think they are looking at all angles ?
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  • sevmomsevmom 8383 replies55 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    From Facebook,the adult children also seem to be very into hiking, rock climbing . Farrah says she is already refunding GoFundMe contributions for the search. Greg implies this episode shows that "marginalized" people are not searched for the way his mother was and says he is not going to comment further. It will be interesting to see how this all plays out . If there is any deception, agenda at all in this (hope not), I hope there are penalties/charges going forward. I don't know what to believe here. Very confusing narrative .
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