right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
We have identified a log in issue that is preventing some members from accessing the site. The support team is diligently working on resolving it. We hope to have an update soon. Read more here. Thanks for your understanding!

My husband's medical issue - what to do when you've done everything you could think of?

Emily0722Emily0722 143 replies33 threads Junior Member
My husband has this back issue that first manifested itself about 6 weeks ago, we seem to remember that it started right after his soccer game.

It's on one side (left) in the mid-back section and it's really weird - he can play soccer, walk and run for miles, doesn't bother him when he lies down or sleeps but he can't sit without experiencing pretty bad pain.

He's tried so far: urgent care, ER, PCP, MRI of his lumbar back, orthopedic surgeon, PT, acupuncture and a chiropractor - nothing helps. Also tried a muscle relaxant when the problem first start, that didn't do anything either. He is going to see another orthopedic specialist at Penn but we are just at our wits end and not sure what else to try.

Amazing how all these highly educated, highly compensated people have no clue what's going on. Yes, he has age related arthritis and some narrowing, some bulging disks etc. but nothing that anyone can link directly to his problem. "Sounds like something muscular", "try some PT", "nothing to operate here" - that's what he's been getting and he still can't sit down without pain.

What would you do? We are not even sure which other specialist to go to..
43 replies
· Reply · Share
«13

Replies to: My husband's medical issue - what to do when you've done everything you could think of?

  • momofsenior1momofsenior1 7830 replies66 threads Senior Member
    6 weeks doesn't sound like a long time to me. I was in PT for well over three months before I started to feel any relief from my back issues (displaced lumbar disc that was compressing a nerve). Took close to a year to get back to normal and things still flare up now and again. I continue to need to do PT exercises regularly.

    Only meds were steroids at the initial flare up and OTC meds.

    Sitting was very hard for me too.
    · Reply · Share
  • abasketabasket 19706 replies876 threads Senior Member
    Has he been recommended to stop some of his other physical activity which might be (non-obviously) contributing to the pain or progress of healing? (like the running or walking for miles).

    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 8852 replies106 threads Senior Member
    Maybe a visit to WebMD regarding lower back pain may help.
    · Reply · Share
  • blossomblossom 9962 replies9 threads Senior Member
    Agree with momofsenior. I had a shoulder issue and it took a year for the pain to go away- and that's with meds AND PT.
    · Reply · Share
  • MaineLonghornMaineLonghorn 39067 replies2143 threads Super Moderator
    My ankle tendinitis took about 15 months to get better. It was discouraging. I'm trying running again and hope it goes OK.
    · Reply · Share
  • somemomsomemom 10878 replies325 threads Senior Member
    Can he twist, move, wiggle, etc. in any way to create the pain, to exacerbate it? To find positions that may increase the pain might help find the cause, think weird yoga stretches to find the catalyst.
    · Reply · Share
  • jonrijonri 7300 replies134 threads Senior Member
    This won't cure it or tell you the cause, but I suggest a sauna if you have one available. Among other things...I can move muscles further with less pain after a few minutes in the sauna. If it's a muscle, the heat will relax it.
    · Reply · Share
  • conmamaconmama 4448 replies326 threads Senior Member
    I don’t know when he started acupuncture, but for something like that I imagine he would have to go about 7 times, and they keep spacing it apart, so it would take close to 3 months. Did he see a licensed acupuncturist? I think there are a lot of folks out there who don’t know what they are doing.
    · Reply · Share
  • doschicosdoschicos 21574 replies226 threads Senior Member
    Have any of the docs suggested a steroid injection?
    · Reply · Share
  • Emily0722Emily0722 143 replies33 threads Junior Member
    @abasket No, he was told he can continue with his normal physical activities..

    @somemom, yes, he can definitely twist in a certain way that aggravates it but they still haven't been able to pinpoint the cause..

    That's interesting that many of you are saying it took a really long time for you to feel better.. His big concern is that he'll have to live with this pain from now on..

    Actually, he seems to feel better when he puts ice on the spot and generally, changing from a sitting position seems to alleviate the pain but what does this indicate? Why is it so difficult for medical professionals to give us the diagnosis?
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 8852 replies106 threads Senior Member
    Will a steroid injection cure the problem or just mask the pain like an injection of cortisone ?

    · Reply · Share
  • abasketabasket 19706 replies876 threads Senior Member
    Well, you don't want to be treated wrongly or be given invasive treatment without cause - and medicine IS a science - not everything is cut and dry. Not everything has a "quick fix" or a immediate solution!


    · Reply · Share
  • Emily0722Emily0722 143 replies33 threads Junior Member
    No steroid injection was recommended, that's possibly something to ask the second orthopedic doctor.

    He only went to an acupuncturist a few times, felt no relief and stopped going.
    She is a licensed practitioner but didn't know the cause either so in his mind, if she doesn't know what it is, how can she be treating it..
    · Reply · Share
  • blossomblossom 9962 replies9 threads Senior Member
    Not every kind of pain has a "if it's this it must be that" kind of diagnosis. Acute lower back pain that comes on suddenly- yes, make sure it's not his appendix, make sure it's not a kidney stone, etc. But after ruling those kinds of things out, you're going to be left with a long laundry list of things that get aggravated by a fall, too much muscle stress, lifting an unfamiliar load (like a case of seltzer from a high shelf at the grocery store where you don't bend your knees so the stress is unevenly distributed) or whatnot. And those take forever to heal. Hugs.
    · Reply · Share
  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 39151 replies470 threads Senior Member
    edited December 3
    "Will a steroid injection cure the problem or just mask the pain like an injection of cortisone ?"

    Cortisone is a steroid. Steroid injections can help in two ways: (a) locate the source of the pain (if a targeted to a specific joint injection alleviated the pain, that joint could be the source of it) and (b) alleviate inflammation and allow the whatever area is affected to heal.
    edited December 3
    · Reply · Share
  • makemesmartmakemesmart 1681 replies14 threads Senior Member
    Not a medical professional but I have had many encounters with MDs to realize that medicine is a long way from being a “science”. That being said, I would actually suggest going to see a generalist, not a specialist, esp not an orthopedic doc. (who are now specialized into Hand, shoulder, hip, ankle etc. and whose vision might be even smaller than the parts of your body they are specialized in). Rule out other issues first, and the pain might be just coincidental with soccer playing.
    Also agree that six weeks might not be long enough time for muscle/joint pains to get better/go away. Lots of water, hot sauna, rest never will hurt.
    Feel your frustrations and good luck!
    · Reply · Share
  • VeryHappyVeryHappy 18616 replies326 threads Senior Member
    Read this: https://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/patient-caregiver-education/fact-sheets/low-back-pain-fact-sheet
    Most low back pain is acute, or short term, and lasts a few days to a few weeks. It tends to resolve on its own with self-care and there is no residual loss of function. The majority of acute low back pain is mechanical in nature, meaning that there is a disruption in the way the components of the back (the spine, muscle, intervertebral discs, and nerves) fit together and move.

    Subacute low back pain is defined as pain that lasts between 4 and 12 weeks.

    Chronic back pain is defined as pain that persists for 12 weeks or longer, even after an initial injury or underlying cause of acute low back pain has been treated. About 20 percent of people affected by acute low back pain develop chronic low back pain with persistent symptoms at one year. In some cases, treatment successfully relieves chronic low back pain, but in other cases pain persists despite medical and surgical treatment.

    In other words, of those people who develop chronic back pain, 80% of them are resolved at one year.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 8852 replies106 threads Senior Member
    edited December 3
    Not clear whether OP is concerned about "lower" back pain or "mid" back pain. Reads as if it is "mid" back pain on the left side.
    edited December 3
    · Reply · Share
  • taverngirltaverngirl 1102 replies30 threads Senior Member
    My brother has been experiencing back pain for years - no medical solutions. He just recently began using CBD oil and he has absolutely no pain whatsoever (he has knee issues as well but the oil isn't working on those). Worth a shot while you're exploring other avenues.

    Seconding steroid pack to reduce inflammation.
    · Reply · Share
  • PublisherPublisher 8852 replies106 threads Senior Member
    edited December 3
    Just a wild, unqualified suggestion: If the pain is mid back, could it be an issue with a lung. I have known others who suffered a "bruised lung", but they had been in fights. Possible lung infection ?
    edited December 3
    · Reply · Share
Sign In or Register to comment.

Recent Activity