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Diet/Exercise/Health/Wellness Support Thread

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Replies to: Diet/Exercise/Health/Wellness Support Thread

  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38934 replies468 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    "Bread is the same story. What is truly whole grain--very few that have the name on their label."

    True, that's why I don't buy the "whole grain" thing, I go for the multi-grain arisan breads (the ones that look like they are made of a mixture of seeds and nuts). They are heavier, but have more nutritional value and taste compared to the whole-grain cardboard.

    Happy and healthy New Year to all CCers!
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  • MichaelNKatMichaelNKat 4250 replies58 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Lergnom's post 78 is right on the money when it comes to eating out. There are so many hidden calories that you don't even think about. That basket of bread sitting on the table as you hungrily await your food, the uncontrolled portion of dressing on your salad, the oversized portion of your entr
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  • worknprogressworknprogress 1523 replies13 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    MichaelNKat - thanx! I have tried to obtain my maximum heart rate by doing sprints on the track, but I wasn't sure if that was accurate. Your formula comes pretty close for me. I have a polar heart monitor and use it for different workouts, but I am thinking of "borrowing" the wonderful garmin forerunner I gave my DH for xmas. Love the pace function!
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  • FauxNomFauxNom 1185 replies35 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Several years ago NPR had a really interesting report on one doctor's research on dieting, and how complex programs just get dropped too easily. This led him to invent the "no white at night diet." He claimed that keeping refined white flour, rice, etc., out of the evening meal and snacks would help immensely with weight loss because of the way the body processes the insulin or something. I've wanted to try it, but can't shake the habit of eating what the kids eat, which is lots of rice and pasta. Soon to be an empty nester, maybe I can find the willpower this year.

    I'm another former "stick" who ought to lose 30 pounds. It's really hard to change when you identify yourself, in your core being, as a skinny person who can eat anything!

    At the risk of really sounding like an old fart, has anyone here tried the Curves program? A serious gym is just not my thing, but I wonder if Curves would be more palatable?
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  • 1ofeach1ofeach 391 replies31 threadsRegistered User Member
    I went to Curves for a long time and enjoyed it- but never firmed up. Despite the outrageous calorie burned claims, the program in very easy. I think people actually burn a small fraction of the calories that Curves claims that you'll burn. I switched to a real gym where you could work out at a higher intensity. Curves is great for socializing though. I still miss that aspect of it. You move around the circle together and chat as you go. But no one (at least where I went) breaks a sweat.
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  • sabaraysabaray 7078 replies80 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I know women who have claimed success with the Curves program. I do notice that the majority of them have not stuck with it and have reverted to their formal selves. Don't know if that's because of them or the program.

    I like rice and pasta too. We've switched to whole wheat pasta for the most part and once you make the adjustment it's fine. Whatever you do, don't omit the salt when boiling the water. I think eating most things that have undergone minimal processing is going to offer a health benefit. The more complicated something is, the less likely I am to stick with it.
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  • hmom5hmom5 10799 replies83 threads- Senior Member
    Again, for those like myself who hate gyms, I highly suggest an a home program that requires no more than some free weights and a resistance ball. Add a weight bench when you build your program. All of this requires very little effort. I


    I use the ball for ab crunches first thing in the AM and squats--this totals under 20 minutes. I use the weights 3 X week for no more than an hour. Then add your cardio like walking, swimming, dancing, a spinning bike....and you're set, taking up very little room and doing while you watch TV.
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  • 2blue2blue 1546 replies58 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Northminnesota, check with your library. Our library system has iPod-compatible audio books which can be downloaded, in addition to ones which can be read on one's iPod.
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  • mousegraymousegray 1621 replies21 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    The "no white at night" sounds like a good idea. I would like to seriously reduce the amount of refined carbs/sugars in my diet but it takes a certain amount of effort. I did feel a lot better sticking to brown rice and other whole grains and it's more filling too. I am going to give this a try.
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  • intparentintparent 36291 replies644 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    mom60, two things I did that made a big difference (dropped 20 lbs in a year without a lot of effort):

    - Started making my own breakfast and lunch, not buying it at work (saved money, too!). It is sooo easy to grab a muffin at work, or something in the cafeteria that is not healthy. I started making pb&j on wheat the night before and eating it in the car in the morning (have an evil commute at the moment...) or hard boiling a couple of eggs to eat at my desk, and also packing lunch 3-4 days a week. I still eat with my teammates in the cafeteria, just some of us brown bag. I plan ahead for the lunches when I make the weekly menus so I can shop appropriately. Lots of times I poach some chicken breasts on Sunday night for a few days of sandwiches, and make extra of dinners for leftovers. I still eat out once or twice a week. I often pack a snack (extra piece of fruit) and keep peanut butter & wheat crackers in my desk, too.

    -Instead of eating dessert after dinner, I usually have 2 squares of dark chocolate & a handful of raw almonds shortly before bed. Sometimes with a small glass of grape juice or red wine :) Again, occasionally I have dessert if there is something good or if I go out, but most nights I have this. (Just had my cholesterol checked this week, and my good was VERY high - - thanks to this habit, I think!).

    Regarding exercise with reading or TV, I agree that my intensity is a bit lower. But I really look forward to exercising much more, and find I am MUCH more likely to exercise 5-6 days a week because there is a fun component to it. Because I am using an exercise machine at home, my workout takes 30-45 minutes, which fits into my schedule so much better than anything else I have tried.
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  • EPTREPTR 3896 replies78 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Okay, I'm in. It has been an absolute all out food fest since Thanksgiving and it has got to stop. I just had my last "pre-diet" meal at a Mexican restaurant. Tomorrow I am back on weight watchers. I have found that it works for me if I stick with it. Sticking with it is the challenge. What I find so difficult is planning my meals and snacks so that I don't give into temptation when i am busy and hungry. Also finding time and motivation to exercise is a challenge. Between a full time job, grad school and a family I have all I can do to find time to eat at all but somehow I still manage to gain weight.

    I did read something online today from Dr. Oz about weight loss. Most of what he had to say was old news but a couple of the suggestions were new for me.

    * don't drink diet soda because it fools your body into thinking it has taken in real sugar and causes your body to store fat.

    *Eat the same thing for lunch everyday. I forget why but studies have shown that people who eat the same meal at lunch everday have a much greater weight loss than people who eat a variety of foods at midday.

    * Hot pepper or peppers at breakfast will reduce your appetite all day.
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  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang 18352 replies158 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Eat the same thing for lunch every day.

    So now we not only have to watch our calories, but we have to bore ourselves? Feh.
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  • FallGirlFallGirl 8046 replies27 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    I saw the Dr. Oz article, too. I can eat the same lunch every day, it's the hot peppers at breakfast that I couldn't handle.
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  • worknprogressworknprogress 1523 replies13 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Well, I am lovin' this thread!

    I was doing great with diet and exercise, but the last few weeks have been pretty rough. Since October, my mom, DH, and my Dad have all had unscheduled trips to the ER and each one was in the hospital for at least 5 days. My usual schedule of exercise and diet have gone up in flames. Couple that with the holidays & you have a recipe for disaster. My greatest downfall are a couple of glasses of wine before I go to bed (to relax) and the accompanying cheese and drinking Coke to get a burst of energy during the day.

    So - starting tomorrow, I am eliminating the coke. The wine? Hmmm, not committed to that just yet.
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  • EPTREPTR 3896 replies78 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    'I can eat the same lunch every day, it's the hot peppers at breakfast that I couldn't handle.'

    If the hot pepper idea leaves you cold you can try cinnamon with your breakfast. It is supposed to increase your metabolic rate. A sprinkle on your cereal or over your coffee grounds before brewing can do the trick and its definitely tastier than the pepper.
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  • BunsenBurnerBunsenBurner 38934 replies468 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    workinprogress, try this trick: instead of only cheese, have some cut up fruit and cheese on your plate when you drink your wine. Gradually replace some cheese with fruit untill all you have is fruit. It worked for DH!
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  • FallGirlFallGirl 8046 replies27 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    try cinnamon with your breakfast

    I like oatmeal in the AM, so I will try it, it sounds good. Thanks, EPTR
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  • teriwttteriwtt 12019 replies513 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    OK... add me to the group. I am four months from 50, and there just are no more excuses anymore. However, I have several challenges that create difficulties for me. I am hypoglycemic and find keeping to some kind of eating schedule regarding meals is impossible. Literally, when the sugar low kicks in, I can quickly go from OK to shaky, sweaty, nauseaus and light-headed; at that point, I have to grab whatever I can (I've literally asked people for food) and don't necessarily have the time to grab something nutritious. I try to take just enough to get me over the hump and until I can get something more healthy.

    Probably my biggest problem is that there are a lot of foods I just don't like, that many people recommend, like yogurt and fish. My husband had some minor health concerns come up at the end of last summer, and our doctor recommended the South Beach diet. He has done so incredibly well with it, and all his blood tests are now normal, along with his blood pressure. He also joined the gym and goes regularly. He has lost quite a bit of weight. I have adopted some of the South Beach recommendations, but he can eat fish four times a week, and I can't handle one. I also am not a big fan of salads for a meal (although one of my favorite salads is the Fuji Apple Chicken salad from Panera Bread... and I do get the apple with it, as opposed to the bread or chips) and he does well with this. On top of it all, I have pretty bad GERD... which I suspect would improve with a weight loss of 20 or 30 pounds, so that also impacts what I can and can't eat, especially at dinner time. I've been on Nexium, twice a day, for many years, but still must be careful.

    So, for working out... I used to belong to Contours Express, until our local club closed just over a year ago. However, even when I was at my best with going, I get soooo incredibly frustrated with what I see as a lack of progress. I'd love it if someone could explain this to me: from what I understand, if you want to burn fat, you go with a lower heart rate than if you're doing aerobic training. However, to keep my heart rate within that fat-burning range, I absolutely do not break a sweat. I look at people around me walking/running twice as fast, at four times the incline, etc., and I just get so incredibly depressed.... I look like I'm doing a warm up or cool down for the entire session. Anyway, so when my husband joined the gym in October (when he could no longer ride his bike), he signed me back up (I'd been a member several years ago before I went to Contours Express), and I've just now gone a handful of times.

    The only thing that has ever led me to believe that workouts change me is when I go see my massage therapist. Several times, when I've started new programs that included lifting weights, I won't mention it to her, but sure enough, within a month of my starting, I'll go in for one of my twice-monthly massages, and she'll ask me, "Are you working out?"... because she can tell that my muscles are more tone.

    So I guess I'm at a point where I just want to see at least a small decrease in my weight when I'm working out, that I never usually see, although I'm focusing more on fat-burning heart rate than aerobic heart rate. But I can completely understand why I don't lose weight, because I never break a sweat (unless I get hypoglycemic!). I hope someone here can help direct me to what I might try.
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  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang 18352 replies158 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    from what I understand, if you want to burn fat, you go with a lower heart rate than if you're doing aerobic training.

    But if you're going at a lower heart rate, you have to exercise for a longer time to get the weight-loss benefit. For example, you can walk at two miles an hour, or three miles an hour, but if you walk at two miles an hour, to get those three miles in, you have to walk for an hour and a half.

    If you walk at two miles an hour, and you walk for half an hour, you've walked a mile. Which doesn't require that many calories.

    So, teriwtt, I recommend trying a nice long walk (a couple of hours, say) once a week. Take some pocket food in case you get shaky. I don't know about your dietary requirements, but I find protein stays with me longer, so I don't get a blood sugar crash; therefore I recommend bringing something like a handful of almonds and an apple.
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  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang 18352 replies158 threadsRegistered User Senior Member
    Or do something else fun. You live in Chicagoland-- go skating. Or how about ballroom dancing? Cross country skiing? Snowshoeing? Square dancing?
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