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Question for you parents

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Replies to: Question for you parents

  • MomfromKCMomfromKC Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    What do you do with a history major during an election cycle? Let me think about that for five seconds. You tell him to go volunteer for a local candidate. Get out there and shake some hands. He will land a job in something related eventually. In the mean time he can work as a pharmacy tech. There is nothing that says he can't work a 40 hour week and then do volunteer work in addition. Plenty of people his age juggle jobs, kids and school.
  • gator4evergator4ever Registered User Posts: 553 Member
    You guys are correct. He has had his degree for years now. My bad.

    MomfromKC you made an excellent point. He can volunteer to help in a campaign and when they notice what a hard working person he is. Doors will open and if they dont? at least he had made new contacts and gotten out of the house.
  • ryhoyarbieryhoyarbie Registered User Posts: 33 Junior Member
    "You need to figure out where you want to be in 5-10 years."

    Either 5 to 10 years older if not dead...........
  • EndicottEndicott Registered User Posts: 1,435 Senior Member
    At least he's working. I have a nephew who just lives with his parents and plays computer games all day. If he gets hungry at 2:00 a.m. he shakes his mother awake so she can cook something for him--and she does! The fact that son gets out there and makes a butt gives me hope for you. I'll bet you aren't cooking him any 2:00 a.m. meals!
  • MomfromKCMomfromKC Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    Either 5 to 10 years older if not dead...........

    Would you hire you with that kind of attitude? Perhaps you need to volunteer at the animal shelter before you work your way up to humans. You are 29 years old. It is time to grow up.
  • minimini Registered User Posts: 26,431 Senior Member
    Bill Gates never even had a job, and lived in the basement after dropping out of college. And if his mom hadn't been good friends with the CEO of IBM, and had lunch together, he might still be there.
  • BrooklynborndadBrooklynborndad Registered User Posts: 2,263 Senior Member
    "Bill Gates never even had a job, and lived in the basement after dropping out of college. And if his mom hadn't been good friends with the CEO of IBM, and had lunch together, he might still be there. "

    My understanding is that Gates dropped out AFTER he (and steve balmer?) landed a substantial contract.
  • BrooklynborndadBrooklynborndad Registered User Posts: 2,263 Senior Member
    "Either 5 to 10 years older if not dead...........

    Would you hire you with that kind of attitude? Perhaps you need to volunteer at the animal shelter before you work your way up to humans. You are 29 years old. It is time to grow up."

    To be 30, no steady work for 6 years, and living at home (and facing todays economy) is legitimately depressing.

    My suggestion to this young man: Forgive yourself for being down. Be PROUD that after all that, you had the courage to get the Pharm Tech cert, which many young people wouldnt do. NOW go and get a Pharm Tech job. DONT WORRY that the money is poor - this is not the time yet to worry about that. KEEP living at home (IF that situation is not depressing in itself). Save money. Work hard at the Pharm Tech job - build your resume, and get the potential for good references. Do SOMETHING else, to improve your mood and make friends - if its volunteer work, great - if its just something fun,also good. Wait till you've been working and saving for a few months, and THEN re-evaluate. At that point you may be able to move out and get roommates IF thats whats best for you. At some point in the future there will be teaching jobs opening up again. You MAY decide to go back to school and get more quals in the Pharmacy direction.

    Take a deep breath. Stop worrying. If this post isnt enough to make that possible, look for a therapist who can help.
  • ryhoyarbieryhoyarbie Registered User Posts: 33 Junior Member
    "Would you hire you with that kind of attitude? Perhaps you need to volunteer at the animal shelter before you work your way up to humans. You are 29 years old. It is time to grow up."

    Would I hire me with that kind of attitude? Since I never display that kind of attitude at the workplace when I sub for teachers or when I'm getting an interview, then yes I'd hire myself based on the qualifications and how well I did on the interview after I looked at other candidates.

    You know I'm sure people in their 40's and 50's who have been out of work for over a year if not more have a depressing attitude since they can't find a job even though they have the experience, education, and qualifications.
  • greenbuttongreenbutton Registered User Posts: 2,547 Senior Member
    "Even though they have the experience, education, and qualifications". No question that the economy is difficult. I think the difference between success and inertia is hardwork, perserverance, flexibilty and humility. If you think that just having experience, education and qualifications is enough to get a job, you haven't been reading the papers. It won't be enough, it hasn't been enough. People with college degrees are easy to find. Hard working, conscientious, punctual and humble college grads are still in demand. Find something to do -- both for yourself and for others. If you are living at home, the pay rate is less important than the fact that someone is depending on you to show up and work every day. The problem with depression is often that you are too depressed to climb out of the hole on your own, and you sound like you need someone to throw you a ladder, so to speak. You are smart enough to have a degree, smart enough to see you are in a bind, interested enough in changing your circumstances. It isn't all downhill from here.
  • UCDAlum82UCDAlum82 Registered User Posts: 1,084 Senior Member
    Did you read Brooklynborndad's whole post? There is a lot of good uplifting advice there.
  • ryhoyarbieryhoyarbie Registered User Posts: 33 Junior Member
    "Did you read Brooklynborndad's whole post? There is a lot of good uplifting advice there."

    Yes I read it after I responded to someone else.
  • ConsolationConsolation Registered User Posts: 22,793 Senior Member
    ryhoyarbie, I am not going to minimize the difficulty of finding jobs when it seems as if one is "over qualified" for all of the comparatively menial ones and lacking enough experience for all of the rest, BT/DT. It is enormously frustrating and really depressing. The current state of the economy makes it that much worse.

    That said, your posts here scream depression to me. I've also BT/DT.

    As soon as your pharmacy tech papers come through, you can start looking for a job there. You might also want to consider looking for tutoring work, since you have a degree and you have experience working with kids. Tutoring is usually very part time, but it could supplement something else. Look for things that take advantage of what you have. Are you a runner? How about working as an assistant track or cross country coach. Another very part time job, but something worthwhile that gets you out of the house and provides human contact and some structure, both of which you sorely need, and both of which help to combat depression. You could, assuming that you actually like teaching, look into pursuing a teaching credential, if you can do so without spending a lot of money. SOmetimes one can do that at the local CC. A young male teacher with the ability to coach a sport can be a desirable hire for middle schools and high schools. You should also contact the placement department at your college and see what help they can give you. SIgn up for all of the available temp agencies. So what if they have a lot of applicants: they still have to hire SOMEONE. If you aren't on the list, you can be absolutely sure it won't be you.

    Lastly, forget the TV dinners. No wonder you have no energy! Learn to cook some simple stuff, like burgers( not preformed), chili (not from a can), scrambled eggs, meat loaf, and spaghetti sauce. Make a salad. You can eat much better for much less money.
  • MomfromKCMomfromKC Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    Well you didn't read mine very well. When someone asks you what your goals are you don't say to either to still be alive or to be dead. That is not an acceptable answer. You either give it some thought or you skip it, and of course you have the option to give it some thought in the privacy of your own head and not post your answer here.
    You are a 29 year old graduate coming on the parents' section of a college search web site. You write like you are the parent of the almost 30 year old when you aren't. And then you present it as hypothectical when it is true. Try being honest with us and with yourself.
    I think the first thing you need to do is get off the computer and out of the house. The second thing you need to do is put together some resume/cover letter combo for the pharmacies that tells them the date you took and passed the test and the date you expect to have your status changed so they have you on file and in their systems and stop using that as an excuse to wait. Then when your status changes you give them each a call and say "Do you remember that application I dropped off, well I'm offical now..." Then you need to go find some volunteer work that will put you amoung people rather than isolating yourself and hanging out on the intenet. Perhaps your attitude will improve when the phone starts ringing for sub jobs now that school is back in session. Maybe you are in a funk because you miss interacting with students over the summer.
    I still don't get why you had to start off acting like you were the mom of this poor depressed hard luck case. Were you hoping we would give your mom some advice so she could lift you out of your depression? Were you going to print it out for her and tell her what she was doing wrong? If you want help plenty of people her have given you valid suggestions. If you want a pity party go find the mom who is willing to get up a 2 am to cook for her son.
  • MidwestMom17MidwestMom17 Registered User Posts: 116 Junior Member
    I would definitely push an adult child to get a better paying job, or, more importantly, a job with long-term career potential or in a field in which the child was interested -- regardless of pay.
    I would charge the child rent, but save that money for the child for an eventual security deposit and furniture for their first apartment. And set a target date (though not immovable) of when he would move out.
    Also important to give suggestions for making friends -- the track coach idea is great (even if as unpaid assistant). Other ideas -- join a large church with a "singles" group, college alumni group if nearby, volunteer for campaigns, Big Bro/Big Sister or other nonprofits, historical sites, running club (ask about a club at a store that specializes in running shoes & apparel if town is big enough for that) etc. Also, go run in a large park or place with other runners -- talk to runners his age. Or take a graduate course at nearby college. Aim for at least 2 activities outside work besides running. This should lead to friends, potential roommates, and perhaps career contacts -- plus should be enjoyable. Dump any activity not enjoyable and try another.
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