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"paying" daughter to go with STEM - doing the wrong thing?

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Replies to: "paying" daughter to go with STEM - doing the wrong thing?

  • collegeshoppingcollegeshopping Registered User Posts: 1,935 Senior Member
    The rest of you need to take reading comprehension classes.

    But that would so liberal arts of us.

    I am the mom of kids that were STEM majors and LA majors. The LA majors do make a little less money, but in general are much happier, more well traveled and frankly more educated, and can actually carry so many different faceted conversations, etc., (Making them generally more interesting) This is a sample from my world, so take it for what you will, but then again I am just a 'mom' business owner, humanities educated, who has earned enough to educate my children.
  • vlinesvlines Registered User Posts: 3,579 Senior Member
    Sorry so much negative on here allgussied. I assume you are sincere in your request for ideas. So here is another to consider.

    I have a different view of college than many others on here. I do not believe that college is soley an opportunity to send kids off to a 4 year camp to "find themselves" or as some like to say on here "just get educated". I think that is part of it. But to me, and in my family, college is an environment to be trained and prepared for work/ job/ career. And I know that there will be many that disagree, that is fine.
    I am getting the feeling that you think along those same lines.

    If I am correct, how about approaching this with your daughter in the reverse. I like that one poster suggested a career aptitude test. It might give your daughter some idea on what she would like to do for a career. Even in a general sense. I would almost bet there are a few she could take on line that would provide some insight to her interests and available careers. Hopefully, it will give her some broad general ideas:

    Medicine (nursing, therapy, MD...)
    Engineering
    Sales
    Business
    (you get the idea)

    Once she has some type of idea of an area she may want to have a career in, she can look at schools that offer majors in those areas, and might find something that interests her. She can set goals to meet her endpoint, rather than trying to find a starting point with no goals. Even if that endpoint is a rather large target.

    Students do go to college undecided. But they usually have some type of idea what direction they want to go in as far as science/engineering/lib. arts. And it sounds like your daughter has no idea what direction to even be able to pick out a school. So if she does go to college undecided, make sure the school has a wide varity of major options, and she will have the opportunity to change or expand her major.

    Also, I am wondering if you have a community college close to you where she can take a womens studies course, and/or speak with a professor that teaches it to determine what kind of careers someone does with that major. She may find that after she learns more about it, she is not that interested. Or she may obtain info that changes your mind about that career path. Some community colleges have career exploration courses that guide students through looking at career options, what they offer, and the education they need. That may be available to her at the community college as well.

    Good luck to you and your daughter!
  • MomfromKCMomfromKC Registered User Posts: 378 Member
    A girl who is interested in women's studies should study teaching or nursing. Those are the traditional women's careers. Tell her she should be considering those areas as undergrad and can always minor in or go on for grad school for women's studies, but you are concerned that she not starve. She can teach anything from K to women's history to hs physics or become a CNM or NP. There will be plenty of opportunities to contect with and understand women along the way. Women's studies might be a wonderflu way to round out her career and her life experiences. Daughters of female engineers can be at a serious disadvantage when it comes to connecting to the feminine.
    BTW if you really are a female engineer I would love an explaination of All Gussied Up - not a name a single SWE member I can think of would have picked including myself. Mama wears steel toed boots - now there is a proper name for a female civil engnieer!
    If it makes you feel any better I wouldn't pay for a kid to get a degree in women's studies either. A BSRN with a minor in women's studies. no problem!
  • HuntHunt Registered User Posts: 26,854 Senior Member
    A girl who is interested in women's studies should study teaching or nursing.
    My brain just exploded. And hey, you left out home ec.
  • cartera45cartera45 Registered User Posts: 12,440 Senior Member
    Those who choose to major in Women's Studies are perhaps the least likely candidates for "traditional" women's careers like nursing and teaching.



    Cross posted with Hunt - my head exploded right along with yours.
  • HuntHunt Registered User Posts: 26,854 Senior Member
    cartera45, we cross-posted with the same reaction, but you put it so much more nicely.
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    What I think is so funny about STEM triumphalism (epiphany's phrase, so credit given where due) is that these people just don't have any common sense.

    Let's see. So you major in a STEM field and then you have your fancy new salary, better than your LA friends. So what do you DO with that salary? You buy a nice house -- which might entail buying some pieces of art and hiring an interior designer. You buy season tickets to a concert series where you listen to music and watch dancers. You buy your iPad or Kindle and take advantage of that technology to download the latest book by an interesting historian or economist. Or maybe just a fun novel for the beach. You hear a foreign phrase you don't know and you use google translate to figure it out. You have kids, and you enroll them in children's theater, and take them to the library to read books. All of these things have people and jobs behind them to make them happen, and then you go home to CC and declare that there is little use for non STEM majors and certainly no job prospects. Honestly, how dumb can someone be to think this?
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    Hunt and cartera - move over on the exploding bench and make room for me!!
  • HuntHunt Registered User Posts: 26,854 Senior Member
    Let's see. So you major in a STEM field and then you have your fancy new salary, better than your LA friends. So what do you DO with that salary? You buy a nice house -- which might entail buying some pieces of art and hiring an interior designer. You buy season tickets to a concert series where you listen to music and watch dancers. You buy your iPad or Kindle and take advantage of that technology to download the latest book by an interesting historian or economist. Or maybe just a fun novel for the beach. You hear a foreign phrase you don't know and you use google translate to figure it out. You have kids, and you enroll them in children's theater, and take them to the library to read books. All of these things have people and jobs behind them to make them happen, and then you go home to CC and declare that there is little use for non STEM majors and certainly no job prospects. Honestly, how dumb can someone be to think this?
    In fairness, maybe some STEM folks don't do any of these things. They may just sit at home and fiddle with their slide rules.
  • compmomcompmom Registered User Posts: 8,228 Senior Member
    Women's studies would teach that young women are not limited to "traditional" women's careers and goals. It seems there is some misunderstanding here of "women's studies." They are not about "connecting to the feminine."

    A caution about career testing: my daughter was told she had a future as a clown or a conductor, and her friend, a small female, was told she should be a football player. These tests were paid for by a local foundation, so that kids in our public schools could think about their career aptitudes. The funding was cut after a year or two, thank heavens.

    I'm getting off this thread and never should have gotten on!
  • HuntHunt Registered User Posts: 26,854 Senior Member
    Don't go, compmom! If you weren't here, I would never heard about your daughter being advised to be a clown or a conductor! That's rich.
  • vlinesvlines Registered User Posts: 3,579 Senior Member
    I hope you all are not knocking nursing! It is a very good paying profession with a very wide scope of career paths. Bedside nursing is just a starting point. From there, the options are endless.
  • vlinesvlines Registered User Posts: 3,579 Senior Member
    compmom, I can only imagine my response if my son came home telling me he was advised to be a clown! How funny!
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    Comp mom and hunt - my younger sister looked into the Ringling Brothers clown college. For real!
  • vlinesvlines Registered User Posts: 3,579 Senior Member
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