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Which is worse on a kid?

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Replies to: Which is worse on a kid?

  • CatriaCatria 11199 replies150 threads Senior Member
    After reading this, high-tech/IT firms seem to be more friendly towards autists, among which there could be physics PhDs.
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  • collegealum314collegealum314 6683 replies85 threads Senior Member
    Hm...well, I do think that the condensed matter subfield is more employable than the astronomy/cosmology subfield if you intend to work in something that actually uses the advanced training and if you are seriously interested in an industry jobs. Of course, there are jobs in academia if you can get one.

    There are plenty of high tech jobs which need people with quantitative backgrounds. However, some of these may be more uncomfortable for people with Asperger's (I assume this is the kind of autism you have) because they may be more people-oriented. If you have some programming skills, you may be able to do technical consulting. Other than building a customer base (which your physics contacts could potentially help with), it may not require as much teamwork and day-to-day interaction with people as normal engineering jobs. I know people who do this who aren't in the same state as their clients.

    I question the wisdom of choosing a subfield which you don't like though. This can create a lot of problems. In a PhD, you are literally expected to know everything related to your research topic. Are you going to want to do that in a field which doesn't interest you? It's going to be torture. PhDs are hard enough just because of the trial-and-error nature of scientific research.

    I suggest you spend a couple of years in a PhD program in cosmology/astronomy and at that point ask your advisor about your chances for a "next-level" job. Hopefully, they will be honest with you.
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  • collegealum314collegealum314 6683 replies85 threads Senior Member
    After reading this, high-tech/IT firms seem to be more friendly towards autists, among which there could be physics PhDs.

    This is probably true. There is also some "neurotypical" people who don't have the best social skills either, so they wouldn't necessarily be able to distinguish who had Asperger's even if they had a bias.
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  • collegealum314collegealum314 6683 replies85 threads Senior Member
    Sorry for the grammar folks...I hate the no-edit rule.
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