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Is private school worth it?

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Replies to: Is private school worth it?

  • LucieTheLakieLucieTheLakie 3895 replies163 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 4,058 Senior Member
    edited June 2014
    Also, plenty of those $30,000+ a year privates offer generous financial aid. It's not unlike selective LACs--the most competiive (or "elite" if you prefer) often have the largest endowments and thus can offer generous FA to top students regardless of their family income.
    edited June 2014
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  • oldfortoldfort 22726 replies288 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 23,014 Senior Member
    What's interesting is the reason we moved D1 from our public school to private was the public school lacked diversity. We lived in a rather wealthy town, 90+% students were white. Some students were giving D1 a hard time because she was biracial. D1 felt a lot more at home after she was transferred to the private. The school had a lot more Asians, blacks, and students with different religious background. The school drew students from 30+ miles radius.
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  • amarylandmomamarylandmom 623 replies8 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 631 Member
    Great article, ucbalumnus! Thanks for sharing. I think his observations were fascinating and persuasive though I don't really "get" the inability to talk to people from a different background. I would suggest that has more to do with having a low EQ to go with that high IQ. However, I do think the current educational system rewards a very particular intelligence, probably to some detriment to society. Fascinating editorial that made me think!
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  • austinmshauriaustinmshauri 8419 replies305 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 8,724 Senior Member
    Ellen3 wrote: Riff-raff are the bottom students at most publics in the US. Unmotivated, uninvolved parents, drugs, crappy grades, discipline or legal issues. I'm not suggesting all public school children are riff-raff. But when you send your child to a public they share classrooms and hallways with them. The riff-raff will be at the same parties. There aren't really any riff-raff to speak of at the school we send our children to. That doesn't make us snobs, that makes us parents who are lucky enough to be able to afford a school that doesn't have those issues.

    My mother and grandmother always said there are certain types of people you're better off not associating with, and pretentious, arrogant, narrowminded, judgmental people ranked right up there with liars, cheaters, and backstabbers. Using the word "crappy," for instance, would have been enough to raise my grandmother's eyebrow, so perhaps you and your friends are not so refined and above the hoi polloi as you like to imagine.

    Children with "unmotivated, uninvolved parents (who do) drugs, (get) crappy grades, (and have) discipline or legal issues" are everywhere; those problems cut across all economic levels. It's naive to believe otherwise.
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  • blossomblossom 9591 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 9,600 Senior Member
    Ellen- just check out the eye-popping prices at the "therapeutic boarding schools" that are now in vogue.

    These are the children of the 1% (who else can afford it?) whose kids end up taking a plea bargain and heading to Utah in lieu of jail time; kids who have been thrown out of tier one boarding schools, then their local day school, and the parents are desperately seeking a solution which will put the kid back on track.

    I have a colleague whose kid ended up in one of these. All I can say after hearing about the experience is, "Thank god they didn't foist this kid on the local public HS, so that those kids didn't have one more drug addicted peer to deal with".

    Proud member of the uber class.
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  • BestfriendsgirlBestfriendsgirl 931 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 935 Member
    ^^^ Just MHO, but it seems to me like the parents of the children in these kinds of situations need to be more involved in the kid's day-to-day life instead of shipping them off and paying others to put the kid "back on track."
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  • cptofthehousecptofthehouse 28054 replies56 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 28,110 Senior Member
    When my husband's cousin moved into an area where the high school had a lot of non college bound kids, I begged them to put their kids into the Catholic schools near them. But it's difficult a lot of time to really assess schools. The public school was new and shiny and gave out a lot of press, bragged a lot, and did have kids who did well there. Better maybe than the Catholic high school. The big difference was that the Catholic high school had a close to 100% 4 year college matriculation rate for their graduates each year. The public school not only had a lot of kids who did not go to college at all, but who dropped out, ended up in alternative programs and they did not show up in the data. In all fairness, the Catholic school did not report their drop out rates, but I've been able to track them down. Trying to get that kind of info from a public school has been futile for me.

    The Catholic high school was smaller, more down in heels, dinghy, not in a great area, not as many resources, but IMO was the better bet for kids who were not in the upper echelons motivationally, academically, intellectually. And sure enough, the cousins fell into the lower percentages of kids that just did not make it. I put my money on the peer pressure, what the classmates are doing in such situations, unless the kids are clearly up there in stats.
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  • Sue22Sue22 6063 replies106 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,169 Senior Member
    blossom and bestfriendsgirl,

    Re-therapeutic boarding schools, don't judge people who have sent their kids to such schools unless you've walked their paths. I know two families who have sent their kids to therapeutic boarding schools. In one case the child had a severe eating disorder. She spent years in and out of the hospital, both when she was at a local private day school and after that at the local public school. The family is one of the most loving, warm, centered and involved families I know, they did everything they possibly could to help her recover, and they only sent her to the boarding school as a last resort. I firmly believe that without it she'd be dead of a heart attack, but instead she's back with her family, finishing high school.

    The other child had ADHD so severe that she was miserable and made everyone around her miserable, despite extensive therapy and medication. A therapeutic boarding school made a huge difference in her life. The school helped her learn to manage her symptoms and for the first time she was able to succeed academically and socially. Her parents missed her terribly and they were conflicted about sending her away, but at the recommendation of her therapist they cashed in one of their retirement accounts to do so.
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  • blossomblossom 9591 replies9 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 9,600 Senior Member
    Sue, I'm not judging. I'm pointing out that kids from "good families" (i.e. not the rif-raf that one poster is so fearful of) also have issues. And that sending your kid to private school is hardly a way to insulate your child from kids with problems. Some health related. Some drug related. Sometimes criminal activity which requires being removed from the old friends and neighborhood. I think the idea that having your kid in a public school exposes your kid to terrible people and terrible pathologies is highly judgmental- especially since kids who need intervention of some kind come out of all kinds of families- rich, poor, supportive, neglectful, arrogant and humble.
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  • IxnayBobIxnayBob 4355 replies42 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 4,397 Senior Member
    edited June 2014
    oldfort wrote:
    what's interesting is the reason we moved D1 from our public school to private was the public school lacked diversity. We lived in a rather wealthy town, 90+% students were white.

    Although we are white, we found the lack of diversity in our public high school concerning. Our private HS gives financial aid to a good number of students, so many kids from not only different ethnic backgrounds but also lower SES can attend. It was not the only factor for us, but it was a consideration.

    Btw, there are very few disciplinary problems at either the public or private, but my very non-scientific view is that it is actually the higher SES group that is over-represented in the misbehaved group.
    edited June 2014
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  • Sue22Sue22 6063 replies106 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 6,169 Senior Member
    Blossom, sorry if I misread you.

    I think it's pretty much impossible to answer the OP's question without a whole lot of other parameters. There's so much variety among private schools that asking "Is private worth it?" is like asking if going on vacation is expensive.

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  • haleywilson3haleywilson3 16 replies6 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 22 New Member
    I feel it depends on your surroundings and the type of neighborhood you live around. I was never put in private and I still turned out fine (: lol

    Chance me back at http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/what-my-chances/1663804-how-am-i-looking-for-an-acceptance-into-the-university-of-south-carolina.html#latest

    Pretty please && THANK YOU!!
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