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Google employee and CS demographics

ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83386 replies741 threads Senior Member
There was some news about Google employee demographics recently.

http://www.google.com/diversity/at-google.html#tab=tech
http://cra.org/uploads/documents/resources/taulbee/CS_Degree_and_Enrollment_Trends_2009-10.pdf (table 2 and 3)

For Google technical employees compared to overall CS graduates:
Demographic             Google          CS graduates
Women                   17%             14%
Men                     83%             86%
Nonresident alien       NA               8%
White                   60%             67% (73% of residents)
Asian                   34%             15% (16% of residents)
Hispanic                 2%              5% ( 6% of residents)
Black                    1%              3% ( 4% of residents)
Two or more races        3%              1% ( 1% of residents)
Other                   <1%              1% ( 1% of residents)

It appears that the underrepresentation of black and Latino students in CS begins in K-12, according to http://www.exploringcs.org/resources/cs-statistics (although AP CS courses may not be best proxy for interest in CS).
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Replies to: Google employee and CS demographics

  • nanotechnologynanotechnology 2503 replies23 threads Senior Member
    It "starts" in K-12, but it's a chicken and egg cycle. Young females/minorities don't get into CS because that's not what females/minorities do. I think, unconsciously, that's part of the reason I didn't discover CS until I got to college, even though I don't really fit any other "girly" stereotypes. Schools need to be more proactive about getting the under-represented groups into CS, but the companies need to do their part as well, and should invest more in getting a variety of young people into CS. Yes, there's only so much they can do with a limited pipeline, but they can also help to improve that pipe line and not just try to wash their hands of it.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83386 replies741 threads Senior Member
    but the companies need to do their part as well, and should invest more in getting a variety of young people into CS. Yes, there's only so much they can do with a limited pipeline, but they can also help to improve that pipe line and not just try to wash their hands of it.

    In this respect, there may be two forces working against companies doing things in this area:

    1. Companies often have one quarter to one year time frames that they look ahead to. Expanding the pipeline of CS students starting in high school reaps the benefits five to eight years in the future, so a company with a typical Wall-Street-defined one quarter to one year attention span may have less incentive to do something here.

    2. Any effort by a company to expand the pipeline of CS students starting in high school creates a mostly external benefit (more CS graduates who can be recruited by companies in general, rather than by the company that made the effort to expand the pipeline of CS students in particular).
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  • DrGoogleDrGoogle 11022 replies24 threads Senior Member
    My daughter's high school didn't have CS. To join Robotics Club, you need to wait forever for something, she lost interest in the process. Luckily, she did apply to a summer program at MIT about EECS and that gave her a glimpse of what the major/field is. I was not pushing for her to go into any field.
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  • sseamomsseamom 4880 replies25 threads Senior Member
    D's school was created specifically to address this problem, by a black woman who had worked at MS. We had an all-school science fair this year and Google help finance it. The school graduates a number of kids into STEM majors and colleges, when some don't even have a computer at home. THAT is how you do it. Schools and districts from all over the US send people to take a look at the place. Her foundation also runs an after-school program for elementary kids and it's been having similar great results.
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  • mathmommathmom 33186 replies161 threads Senior Member
    I'm hopeful that engineering toys geared toward girls like Goldieblox might make a difference. When my kids played scholastic chess most schools had very male dominated teams, but one school (whose team did very well) was 50/50 - the difference one of the women teachers at the school ran the chess club. I think you have to start early and parents have to be really concious about the pink aisle at the toy store and how much their girls are being influenced by the dominent culture. I think I was probably luckily that I spent a chunk of my childhood with few girls to play with. I had dolls and played house, but I also spent a lot of time with Legos and building cities in our back yard.
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  • VladenschlutteVladenschlutte 4292 replies37 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2014
    The idea is that everyone in college is reconciling some balance between what they like and what can make them money in some fashion when deciding what to study, correct? If so, which of these two factors does showing examples of minority students doing X to younger minority children increase? Does it make people people like it more or does it cause them to make more money doing it?

    If more people majoring in CS is a good thing (seems to be implied in this thread), which is a better outcome, non-minority graduates in CS increases by 20% and minority graduates in CS increases by 10%, or non-minority graduates in CS doesn't change and minority graduated in CS increases by 10%? If the former is better (which is what I suspect), why are we looking at percentages of people by race in the field?
    edited May 2014
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  • mathmommathmom 33186 replies161 threads Senior Member
    I'm just looking for potential mates for my son at Google. :P
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  • colorado_momcolorado_mom 9440 replies83 threads Senior Member
    I'm an engineer. Thinking back on my ms math team, there were 4 girls and 1 guy.... and the ad visor was female, Interesting, never realized there might be a connection there. Thanks Ms K!

    In hs math team, it was mostly guys. There was a male advisor. That never deterred me, but perhaps it did deter other girls from joining.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83386 replies741 threads Senior Member
    mathmom wrote:
    I'm just looking for potential mates for my son at Google.

    May be easier if he is gay than if he is straight.
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  • jym626jym626 57686 replies3023 threads Senior Member
    Is that supposed to be funny, ucb?




    Neither of my google s's has a CS degree.
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  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus 83386 replies741 threads Senior Member
    edited May 2014
    If he is straight, then there will be about a 5 to 1 ratio of men to women that he has to contend with. If he is gay, then the gay men population is just one pool of eligible mates to (mutually) choose from.

    Google and many other Silicon Valley computer companies are notably more gay-friendly than the general area.
    http://fivethirtyeight.com/datalab/how-rare-are-anti-gay-marriage-donations-in-silicon-valley/
    edited May 2014
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  • DrGoogleDrGoogle 11022 replies24 threads Senior Member
    @mathmom, does he fix cars, cook, clean and well verse in domestic engineering? :D
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  • mathmommathmom 33186 replies161 threads Senior Member
    No he has no husbandly virtues at all! He has a good sense of humor and likes to play board games.
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  • bookwormbookworm 9253 replies74 threads Senior Member
    I think Mathmom's son1 sounds like a wonderful young man. I would encourage him to join one of their many clubs, e.g. bookclub, Pilates, whatever that attracts more females than males.
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  • CountingDownCountingDown 13733 replies113 threads Senior Member
    There are a number of Googlers who do social dancing, mainly in Palo Alto. I told my sons long ago that if they could cook or dance, this would be a good way to have a social life. One dances, one cooks. ;)

    DIL reports that her department has gone from one female engineer to four in the past year. She is heavily involved in mentoring and recruitment efforts (she's a site reliability engineer).
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  • razorsharprazorsharp 5909 replies252 threads Senior Member
    I am glad Google continues to hire based on competency rather than race or gender (which would be illegal to do so).
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  • emeraldkity4emeraldkity4 34785 replies1076 threads Senior Member
    Is that supposed to be funny, ucb?

    If there are way more men than women, that wouldnt be funny, but it would be accurate.
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  • DrGoogleDrGoogle 11022 replies24 threads Senior Member
    edited June 2014
    According to the news, Google is going through some training with regards to unconscious bias in their interviewing and hiring because according to a research out of MIT that diversity teams is more productive. I hope diversity also includes age. Who wants to be kick out at age 40?

    I myself went for an interview at Apple when Apple stock was $16 and didn't think it was a good fit for me because the team was mostly white male interviewers. I did ask them why there was no female interviewers and they said they didn't know. So I went to a better company at the time mostly because there was more female engineers and also because the stock of that company was hotter than Apple. Had I knew then what I know now that Apple could go to $600+, maybe I would have kept my mouth shut.
    edited June 2014
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  • BrownParentBrownParent 12597 replies179 threads Senior Member
    Yes it is all very well to wear rose colored glasses. Glad to hear google is interested in examining the problem of unconscious bias.
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  • MichiganGeorgiaMichiganGeorgia 4389 replies85 threads Senior Member
    edited June 2014
    The way things are these days I'd think it would be better to find a mate that worked at different company than the one you work at. I'm not saying Google isn't great just that DH has worked at a number of large corporations and whenever there is a restructuring it can be scary for those couples that work for the same company..
    edited June 2014
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