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A Shocking Number Of The World's Rich And Powerful Attended Elite Colleges

sorghumsorghum Registered User Posts: 3,599 Senior Member
A Shocking Number Of The World's Rich And Powerful Attended Elite Colleges

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-many-rich-powerful-people-went-to-elite-colleges-2014-6


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Replies to: A Shocking Number Of The World's Rich And Powerful Attended Elite Colleges

  • Aj1993Aj1993 Registered User Posts: 113 Junior Member
    edited June 2014
    @sally305‌ exactly! that I think is far more releavent
  • eastcoascrazyeastcoascrazy Registered User Posts: 2,534 Senior Member
    I logged in to make the same comment, @sally305 .
  • TorveauxTorveaux Registered User Posts: 1,461 Senior Member
    The college does not make the rich and powerful, it is the fact they are rich and powerful that gets them accepted and/or enrolled (meaning they can pay tuition) in the elite schools.

    For whatever reason, a great many kids (rich and not as rich) go into jobs similar to their parents. You see athletes, doctors, farmers, military types, etc. who follow in their parents' footsteps. Some of that is networking, some of it is knowledge of the 'ropes' of that field. The same thing applies to colleges of all sorts.

    My parents attended college as older adults and finished at or about the age of 50. My grandparents did not even have a HS education. Two of my siblings finished college in a 'traditional' sequence and eventually got an MS. I took the long route, but finished and my other sibling is an academic senior but is unlikely to ever actually get a degree. The next generation has done better as well. 6 college-age plus. 1 with MS from Stanford. 3 with their BS and the other 1 on a normal track toward graduation and 1 recently dropped out as a Junior, but is returning in the Fall. I expect that the younger end of that generation of our family will have similar results with most, if not all, completing a BA or BS in a 4-5 year frame after HS. We have learned a lot about the 'ropes' of college admission and success and pass that along as presumably will our progeny.
  • HarvestMoon1HarvestMoon1 Registered User Posts: 6,228 Senior Member
    It takes a lot more than the right schools or the right "connections" to become a CEO or "rich and powerful." You need some serious brains and more importantly be fiercely motivated. My observation is that those from the backgrounds described by @dracarys above, often lack the drive.
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member

     “I'm shocked, shocked, to find that gambling is going on in here." 
  • LakeWashingtonLakeWashington Registered User Posts: 9,315 Senior Member
    "Move along, keep moving, move along...nothing to see here."
  • FindmoreinfoFindmoreinfo Registered User Posts: 253 Junior Member
    edited June 2014
    Some probably missed the point....

    In the article:
    "Based on census and college data, I estimate that only about 2% to 5% of all U.S. undergraduates went to one of these elite schools. "

    And we have 38% CEO/rich/powerful people graduated from elite schools. This shows the elite schools do pick highly motivated and intelligent individuals. Much higher percentage of these individuals succeed.

    If you calculated base on 5% went to elite schools:
    Elite college index 0.38/0.05 = 7.6
    Other college index 0.62/0.95 = 0.65
    7.6/0.65 = 11.69 (it is 12 folds)

    Try calculated base on 2% went to elite schools:
    Elite colleges index 0.38/0.02 = 19.00
    Other college index 0.62/0.98 = 0.63
    19.00/0.63 = 30.15 (it is 30 folds)


  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 12,655 Senior Member
    @Findmoreinfo:

    That's a rather banal observation, though, and not terribly helpful to those on this forum. What would be more interesting is comparing how folks who got in to an elite and didn't go do in life to those who did attend an elite.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 12,655 Senior Member
    And again, throwing grad schools where differences in brand, network, and recruiting opportunities matter a lot in with the pool of undergrad schools is shoddy research and thus doesn't tell us much meaningful.
  • sally305sally305 Registered User Posts: 7,604 Senior Member
    What would be more interesting is comparing how folks who got in to an elite and didn't go do in life to those who did attend an elite.

    I believe that what research exists has shown that there is only an appreciable difference among low-income kids who have (or don't have) the opportunity to attend elite schools.

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 76,633 Senior Member
    Torveaux wrote:
    The college does not make the rich and powerful, it is the fact they are rich and powerful that gets them accepted and/or enrolled (meaning they can pay tuition) in the elite schools.

    Not just tuition in many cases. Parental donations large enough to become "developmental admits" or otherwise gain significant admission preferences can help.
This discussion has been closed.