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Why top tech CEOs want employees with liberal arts degrees

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Replies to: Why top tech CEOs want employees with liberal arts degrees

  • blossomblossom Registered User Posts: 8,881 Senior Member
    My company has a couple of HR contractors who earn close to $300K per year (one will earn over that this year, earned a little less last year).

    So which is it- humanities majors are losers who will flip burgers and fold sweaters for the rest of their lives, or humanities majors are big liars who call themselves employees and managers when they are really just contract people and therefore worthy of scorn and derision?

    And what the heck is wrong with the engineers today hating on anyone who has managed to break through the glass ceiling at tech companies (even though it's not them) ?

    I'm proud of what I do. I've worked in tech, I've hired engineers, tech, actuaries, rocket science types for financial services, manufacturing, etc. Only on CC do people believe that everyone at a tech company is a CS major, or everyone at an aerospace company is an aero/astro engineer.
  • DrGoogleDrGoogle Registered User Posts: 11,047 Senior Member
    My posts are all related to post #34 where humanities majors are hired to work in jobs that are not tech related.
    No I don't ever believe only CS get hired by tech companies, for one I think CEOs are too smart, they won't pay you one dime more if they don't think you should get more. For example, they won't pay admin the salary they pay CS majors.
    There are nothing wrong with more female breaking the glass ceiling but I think it's some what misleading to say CEOs love liberal arts majors more than they don't love CS majors.
    As far as contract jobs, there are reasons why they get paid that high because that's the nature of contact jobs. No benefits.
    I've done contact jobs before when my oldest kid was born. I did not want to work one hour overtime without getting paid, which is sometimes common on a small company. Just for reference that's similar salary to what I received in the early 90s.
  • DrGoogleDrGoogle Registered User Posts: 11,047 Senior Member
    Only on CC do people believe that everyone at a tech company is a CS major, or everyone at an aerospace company is an aero/astro engineer.
    I agree with your post #34, I did write that there are support functions at tech companies for liberal arts majors. Some of them are in sales, marketing, and human resources.
    What I disagree with the article that that seems to imply tech CEOs love liberal arts as if they don't love CS/engineering majors. I think that's far from the truth.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 28,298 Senior Member
    Not all "support" jobs are divorced from the tech work. And plenty of them make big bucks. Sales and marketing are fine examples where the folks have to understand the technical nature and be able to trade tech talk with clients- who are also not always just peripheral. I can't really get why you think the article puts CS folks down- it talks about humanities as offering something value-added.
  • DrGoogleDrGoogle Registered User Posts: 11,047 Senior Member
    I don't think the article puts down CS folks, I think it exaggerates the love for liberal arts. All tech companies have functions that can be filled by liberal arts and non-liberal arts. It's not just the liberal arts these tech companies are going after.
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    "did write that there are support functions at tech companies for liberal arts majors. Some of them are in sales, marketing, and human resources."


    In my world, brand management is the center and the R&D people are the support staff.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 70,443 Senior Member
    Pizzagirl wrote:
    we all know that engineers do better the first few years old, but big whoops. I've never really even seen an engineer make big money unless he / she moves beyond engineering.

    Actually, Thomas J. Stanley found that "engineers produced about 22 percent more wealth per dollar of realized income than did millionaires in general" through more frugal spending habits and money management.

    http://www.thomasjstanley.com/blog-articles/343/Engineering_Economic_Productivity.html
    http://www.thomasjstanley.com/blog-articles/133/Even_More_Frugal_Than_One_Engineer.html
    http://www.thomasjstanley.com/blog-articles/444/A_Cure_for_a_Bad_Case_of_the_Spends.html
  • barronsbarrons Registered User Posts: 24,826 Senior Member
    PG--data covers 20 years. That's more than just starting wages. Many peak in their 40's and go flat,.
  • DrGoogleDrGoogle Registered User Posts: 11,047 Senior Member
    edited September 2014
    PG, I've never known any engineers who didn't make big money, beyond salary. The salary is just the stipend to live in expensive area. Maybe not in the Midwest but in Silicon Valley, it's different.
    EDIT to add houses in Silicon Valley wouldn't be that expensive otherwise.
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    Well, I live in a world in which big marketing talent is well compensated, and like I said, the R&D people are the adjuncts and the support staff (which is not a "diss" of them at all, every company needs all types to make the world go 'round).
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