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Is it common for high achieving students mostly go to state flagships?

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Replies to: Is it common for high achieving students mostly go to state flagships?

  • cobratcobrat Registered User Posts: 12,285 Senior Member
    And coming back to the topic, perceptions of having more grad school/career opportunities is another reason why many students do try their best in getting into a college which facilitates that end for its graduates and alums...whether it's a public flagship or a private college.

    Key factor is whether it has a reputation as a respectable or elite college with the reputation to help its students/graduates/alums in grad school admissions, careers, and yes, sometimes even social networking*.

    * Which sometimes gets taken to ridiculously narrow extremes.
  • penzlypenzly Registered User Posts: 104 Junior Member
    Thumper1, nails it. My son garnered UBuffalo honors program which although he was also accepted at URochester, it would have cost 40k per year more. Need based aid changes the entire equation. Full pay can qualify to get in, but not necessarily be able, or choose to pay.
  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek Registered User Posts: 4,500 Senior Member
    Thumper1, nails it. My son garnered UBuffalo honors program which although he was also accepted at URochester, it would have cost 40k per year more. Need based aid changes the entire equation. Full pay can qualify to get in, but not necessarily be able, or choose to pay.

    This is our reality. It is why our ds is at UA. But, ds is incredibly happy there and does not believe that he "settled" for somethig lesser.
  • FCCDADFCCDAD Registered User Posts: 984 Member
    Just one anecdotal data point: I have a friend who went to our (very large) state flagship university on full ride + stipend in the Honors program. He got involved in research right away, taught lower level undergrad courses in his departments, applied to and was accepted at every grad program his professors suggested, selected and got his Ph.D. from Harvard, and is now a professor himself at a (different) state flagship.

    Not to say that everyone could follow the same path, and I don't know all the colleges he applied to out of HS, but I'm sure he could not have gone to Harvard undergrad for free + stipend, if he could even have gotten admitted back then. The ug college is just that much harder to get into, his parents would surely have had to pay for it, and he probably wouldn't have had the same opportunities to explore research.

    He observed that the Harvard grad students were generally somewhat less than impressed with the Harvard college undergrads.
  • cobratcobrat Registered User Posts: 12,285 Senior Member
    He observed that the Harvard grad students were generally somewhat less than impressed with the Harvard college undergrads.

    Several friends who are/were PhD students before graduating would concur.

    I myself noticed this while taking some classes at H and at Columbia.

    However, some of the latter's undergrads also had some contempt for the grad student population underscored by a cartoon contemptuously depicting Columbia grad students as homeless people digging through the trash published in the mid-'00s.
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