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Getting in to a good college isn't as hard as it seems

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Replies to: Getting in to a good college isn't as hard as it seems

  • mcat2mcat2 Registered User Posts: 5,942 Senior Member
    edited November 2014
    To illustrate my point in the previous post, you can see that for the students with a 39+ MCAT and 3.8 GPA, the admission rate is in the high 90% range, even though the admission rate to many selective med schools are in a single digit in percentage:

    https://www.aamc.org/data/facts/applicantmatriculant/157998/mcat-gpa-grid-by-selected-race-ethnicity.html

    So for those who are good at tests but not good at beefing up and presenting those "cute" ECs in the college admission cycle, your prowness in testing could be more valued in the next application cycle. (For example, the percentage of Asian American students at, say, HMS, will not be as low as that at Harvard College - is the latter around 18% now? And some other ivies colleges like Yale and Princeton may be even lower.)
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    Why did this discussion morph to med school?
  • mcat2mcat2 Registered User Posts: 5,942 Senior Member
    edited November 2014
    I just want to point out that, when the admission rate to any specific school is low, it is still possible that an applicant can be admitted to at least one school with a good admission rate. Since the admission rate to a med school could be as low (i.e., a single digit) as the admission rate to a HYPS college, I just use that as an example.

    This is related to this part in the original post: "It’s the percentage of top students who are admitted to at least one top school..." When the admission rate to a single school is low, the applicant will rely on this technique to boost its chance to be admitted to at least one school, purely based on the probability theory.
  • FallGirlFallGirl Registered User Posts: 7,757 Senior Member
    The very top unis and LAC's are still very difficult to get in to. Lots of kids with high grades, SAT's >2100, great EC's recs, school rigor are turned away by top schools. We read about it here all of the time.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 11,728 Senior Member
    M+CR SAT can't be over 1600.
  • FallGirlFallGirl Registered User Posts: 7,757 Senior Member
    M+CR SAT can't be over 1600.

    Yes, I know that. I was thinking M+CR+W score. (maximum 2400)
  • FallGirlFallGirl Registered User Posts: 7,757 Senior Member
    ^ agreed, Sally
  • Cardinal FangCardinal Fang Registered User Posts: 17,344 Senior Member
    When we talk about the top 113 schools, what schools are we talking about here? What are the bottom 20 schools on that list?
  • mcat2mcat2 Registered User Posts: 5,942 Senior Member
    edited November 2014
    Also agreed, Sally.

    Assuming that the incoming class to each of the tippy top ones (one of HYPS) is 1500, the admission slots for these four are only 6000 a year. What makes it harder is that you can never figure out how these 4 colleges select their students so that they will have a "buzzing" and active campus. They may not value those students who alway curl up in the library once they set their foot on campus. This is why they put so much emphasis on ECs (It does not hurt that many of the students with the astonishing achievements on major ECs come from a full pay family which may also have a soccer dad or mom who are very committed to the development of their offsprings.)
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 70,502 Senior Member
    When we talk about the top 113 schools, what schools are we talking about here? What are the bottom 20 schools on that list?

    This lists the schools by Barron's selectivity ranking (those listed with '1' are the most selective). Note that this is from 2009, so it may vary somewhat from the list used in the article.

    http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/04/04/business/economy/economix-selectivity-table.html
  • mathmommathmom Registered User Posts: 30,918 Senior Member
    ucbalumnus has probably answered the question, but if you look at US News lists which separate out universities and LACs - in the 40's and 50's for uni's you have things like Boston U, RPI, U of Miami, Northeastern, U of Wisc (Madison), GW, Pepperdine, Tulane. For LACs - Union, Occidental, Bard, Sewanee, Denison,Rhodes, St. Olaf's, St.John (Annapolis).
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 11,728 Senior Member
    I dunno what ranking these people used, but the Forbes ranking has all colleges and universities listed together:
    http://www.forbes.com/top-colleges/list/

    Numbers 111-113 are Kalamazoo, Pepperdine, and UC-Davis there (right above them are Lawrence, Indiana, UMinny-TC, St. Olaf, and Hampshire).


    BTW, 1750 isn't very impressive for M+CR+W SAT.
  • Much2learnMuch2learn Registered User Posts: 4,758 Senior Member
    To me this is an odd discussion. It is clear that elite colleges are more difficult to get into today.

    1. There are more people in the country.

    2. A higher percentage of students want to attend college.

    3. Students apply to more distant colleges than in the past. Ivies get more applicants from California, for example.

    4. Elite schools admit more international students.

    5. Top 10 or 20 schools rarely increase the number of places available.

    6. More students apply to top 20 schools because the financial aid is often better.

    Sure you can always add more schools to the top group and say that it is no harder to get into the expanded group, but that is really not apples to apples. The NYT article should be titled "Getting into a good college isn't as hard as it seems, as long as you have a broad definition of what a good college is"
This discussion has been closed.