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Go for ED2 or keep trying for ED/deferred school?

13

Replies to: Go for ED2 or keep trying for ED/deferred school?

  • brantlybrantly Registered User Posts: 3,738 Senior Member
    @Hanna‌ so they gave up on their first choice, even though there is still a possibility of getting in?
  • MamaBear16MamaBear16 Registered User Posts: 1,112 Senior Member
    How clear is her second choice, really? My D did ED1 (admitted) but when we were waiting we discussed the possibility of an ED2. She didn't have a clear favorite second choice -- there were several schools she would have been thrilled to attend if ED1 didn't work out -- so her plan was to just submit RD apps to those schools.

    If your daughter does ED2 and is then admitted to her first choice, will she still be happy to go to her second pick? If so, it's worth the risk, but if she will be unhappy I wouldn't risk it.
  • HannaHanna Registered User Posts: 14,902 Senior Member
    brantly: yes, because they liked the second-choice school almost as much and wanted to maximize the odds of gong to a top-2 choice.
  • jonrijonri Registered User Posts: 7,386 Senior Member
    edited December 2014
    Umm..we are talking Cornell ILR and the candidate is a NYS resident. For those of you who don't know, ILR is one of the "land grant" parts of Cornell and the tuition for NYS residents is a heck of a lot lower than Emory's. So, I think mom and dad's money factors into this decision.

    If Emory is need blind and the net cost calculator brings it down close to Cornell for this family, that's one thing. However, if your family isn't going to get need based fin aid, I suspect there's a whopping difference in cost. In those circumstances, I'd be really reluctant to pass up the chance of going to Cornell.

  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 26,668 Senior Member
    a few years ago, I happened upon the EDII stats for Emory and they were (surprising to me) not much different thant RD admit stats. (In comparison, EDI at Emory was a significant boost.)

    While the numbers may have changed, I would not recommend EDII anywhere after an ED deferral. (But then I like need-based aid, and EDII should consider themselves full pay.)
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 12,654 Senior Member
    @jonri, well the Cornell contract colleges are certainly lower tuition for NYS residents. I guess "heck of a lot" is in the eye of the beholder, though.

    The Cornell contract colleges have a COA of $47.5K for NYS residents. Emory has a COA of $61.3K (Oxford College of Emory has a COA of $54.7K).
  • HannaHanna Registered User Posts: 14,902 Senior Member
    "a few years ago, I happened upon the EDII stats for Emory and they were (surprising to me) not much different thant RD admit stats."

    Naturally, the unrealistic weaker students are going to show up more in EDII vs. EDI.
  • jonrijonri Registered User Posts: 7,386 Senior Member
    edited December 2014
    PT, I didn't look up the actual cost, so thanks. Still, I think the difference is big enough that if ILR was her first choice, I'd be tempted to wait, especially since ILR is NOT a school that just defers everyone not admitted ED.
  • green678green678 Registered User Posts: 618 Member
    Naturally, the unrealistic weaker students are going to show up more in EDII vs. EDI.

    @Hanna I don't understand this. Would you mind explaining? Wouldn't EDII include students who may have been competitive for an even more selective school and tried that ED1 but when they were unsuccessful they tried EDII at a less competitive school?
  • laticheverlatichever Registered User Posts: 1,522 Senior Member
    ^^Yes, my assumption is that the "weaker" students feel their best shot at a reach school might be ED, which doesn't rue out ED2.
  • brantlybrantly Registered User Posts: 3,738 Senior Member
    Naturally, the unrealistic weaker students are going to show up more in EDII vs. EDI.
    I don't agree with that. My impression is that applicants go for the highest reach during ED1. If they are rejected, they go one notch down for ED2. So, for example, a student with 4.2 and 2300 might try for Yale SCEA, get rejected, then go forTufts ED2.
  • SomeOldGuySomeOldGuy Registered User Posts: 1,986 Senior Member
    edited December 2014
    I think all Hanna is trying to say is that the ED2 pool, by definition, excludes all the successful ED1 candidates while retaining a lot of the folks attempting to use an ED commitment to make up for perceived weaknesses in the application file.
  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 26,668 Senior Member
    I concur with your thinking, old guy, but I'm hung up on the word, "unrealistic." I personally know a lot of unrealistic early applicants to top ~15 schools -- who are rejected ED/EA. (Like the advertisements say, "You gotta play to win", (the lottery)). Yet, they don't play the EDII game, since financial aid is usually not so generous in EDII schools.

  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 76,615 Senior Member
    ED1 may also get more of the "favored" categories (recruited athlete, development, etc.) than ED2.
  • HannaHanna Registered User Posts: 14,902 Senior Member
    "I think all Hanna is trying to say is that the ED2 pool, by definition, excludes all the successful ED1 candidates while retaining a lot of the folks attempting to use an ED commitment to make up for perceived weaknesses in the application file."

    Exactly.
This discussion has been closed.