Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.

NYT - A New Coalition of Elite Colleges Tries to Reshape Admissions

OneMataOneMata Registered User Posts: 82 Junior Member
"With the Common Application now used by more than 625 schools, the coalition is marketing itself as a high-integrity brand. Coalition members must have a six-year graduation rate of at least 70 percent and meet students’ full financial need or, if public, offer “affordable” in-state tuition (as yet undefined). So far, more than 80 of about 140 eligible colleges and universities have signed on, including all the Ivys, liberal arts elites like Amherst and Bowdoin and publics like Texas A&M and Miami University of Ohio.

The coalition wants students as young as ninth grade to engage with its college planner. They will be able to upload videos, photos and written work to a portfolio, called a virtual college locker. Selected items from the portfolio could be added — in some cases years later — to a college application. They can also invite counselors, parents and even admissions officers to view the portfolio and advise on it. (Yes, it works on your phone.)

The organizers believe that access to their schools will be enhanced, in part by getting information sooner to low-income and first-generation students, thus giving them a better shot. Many discover too late the classes, tests and activities needed for a top college, said James G. Nondorf, coalition president and dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Chicago. “Deciding you want to go to one of our kinds of schools, you have to be doing things all through your high school years.”

Replies to: NYT - A New Coalition of Elite Colleges Tries to Reshape Admissions

  • bluebayoubluebayou Registered User Posts: 26,670 Senior Member
    we've discussed this a couple of weeks ago....
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 76,633 Senior Member
    The organizers believe that access to their schools will be enhanced, in part by getting information sooner to low-income and first-generation students, thus giving them a better shot. Many discover too late the classes, tests and activities needed for a top college, said James G. Nondorf, coalition president and dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Chicago. “Deciding you want to go to one of our kinds of schools, you have to be doing things all through your high school years.”

    How many 9th grade low income and first generation students are going to find out that they need to start a college application portfolio? How many overworked counselors in schools with mostly low income and first generation students will have time to advise 9th grade students on their college application portfolios, amid all of the other work that they have to handle (not necessarily just in academic matters)?

    Meanwhile, the counselors in prep schools, magnet schools, and public schools in high income areas will be advising 9th graders to start their college application portfolios, further accentuating the advantages that their students will have for applying to more selective colleges.
  • Waiting2exhaleWaiting2exhale Registered User Posts: 2,911 Senior Member
    With so much social media sharing (if that is not a redundancy), how do all of the kids these days keep anything they are doing from each other? I would think this opens up another avenue of awareness for kids whose teachers, counselors and/or parents are not quietly yet deliberately guiding them toward a college path.

    Engaging the college planner? Is that a passive thing, or is there someone reviewing and helping kids (digitally) set up a roadmap to meeting the respective colleges' criteria for admission consideration? (Will read link later. Just my initial thoughts here.)

  • compmomcompmom Registered User Posts: 10,613 Senior Member
    Eighth grade parents already wanting to meet with college counselors, and kids whose every step from age 13 on is geared to admissions sounds like a recipe for disaster.

    The example of the girl who had a great recital but lackluster essay, and was initially rejected by U. of Chicago, is just silly. So her school advocated for her successfully, based on her musical talent. That should have been unnecessary. She could have sent a supplement to the common application with a video. The counselor could have told her that if he or she knew how to do the job.
This discussion has been closed.