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Internationally adopted kids applying to college

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Replies to: Internationally adopted kids applying to college

  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,424 Senior Member
    "I swear I am a citizen." Oh, if only that is all that is required to prove citizenship!! That's just busy work as that document will do no good. It doesn't prove citizenship and doesn't meet the federal regs for proof of citizenship before receiving FA.

    When they get the FA package ready is up to them. They can't release any federal money until they have proof she's a citizen. Did you ultimately get a FSA ID to use with FAFSA? If so, you should be fine. The school may still require to see her passport, not a copy but the actual passport, before releasing because something might be stuck in her file that her citizenship was in question. They may take a copy for their records, but they have to physically see the passport. (or C of C).

    Notarizing something doesn't make it more official, it only means the signature is 'self authenticating' and your daughter couldn't later deny that she signed it. Again, busy work.
  • MAandMEmomMAandMEmom Registered User Posts: 1,575 Senior Member
    @mom2twogirls it seems like we are going to have to prove citizenship at every single school. Some are good with an affidavit and an image of the passport but one school required a notarized form.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,424 Senior Member
    The federal regs (for getting federal aid) do not allow the schools to accept anything other than personally viewing the proof of citizenship, either a passport of C of C. An affidavit, notarized or not, doesn't meet the requirement.

    Of course, this is only if they suspect citizenship may be an issue. My daughter was never asked, but her FSA ID/SSN confirmed that she was a citizen.
  • oldmom4896oldmom4896 Registered User Posts: 4,022 Senior Member
    My daughter (same year as @twoinanddone) was asked for proof of citizenship. We just brought her passport to orientation. Permanent residents (green card holders) are also eligible for federal aid; presumably they show their green cards.
  • MAandMEmomMAandMEmom Registered User Posts: 1,575 Senior Member
    It’s just kind of crappy to have to prove this over and over again. My kids have SSNs and US passports.
  • 19parent19parent Registered User Posts: 233 Junior Member
    When I adopted my daughter I was told there are good/better/best levels of citizenship proof. To be on the safe side, I got all and many said it was overkill. I made an appointment/interview and got her a certificate of citizenship (best), got the state delayed registration of birth/court blessing (better) and a passport (good). It cost money to do each, as I remember, hundreds of dollars and a lot of paperwork. I did that because each part of the government works differently and looks at documents differently. I did that even though in 2001 the laws had changed and she received automatic citizenship, the process still hadn't caught up and everyone still received green cards upon entering the US. I have never been questioned about anything. I am sorry you have to go through this, but if you don't want them to ever be questioned, you probably still could get those documents.
  • twoinanddonetwoinanddone Registered User Posts: 21,424 Senior Member
    got the state delayed registration of birth/court blessing (better)

    This does not prove citizenship. My daughter's certificate of foreign birth says, right on it 'Not valid for proof of citizenship'.

    If you go to the passport site, it claims it is the BEST proof of citizenship, and I agree. Many people do no know what to make of the C of C and it has a picture of a 2 year old on it. They are used to seeing passports but not C of C. The few times I tried to use daughter's Certificate of Foreign Birth, the clerks/secretaries/government workers didn't know what it was so I just started using the passport for everything, even registering for sports leagues.
  • oldmom4896oldmom4896 Registered User Posts: 4,022 Senior Member
    I got my daughter a Certificate of Citizenship and when I lost it in a move, I replaced it. She's 23 and I am still here to help but I want her to have all the documentation I can provide for her. I think I owe her that.
  • MAandMEmomMAandMEmom Registered User Posts: 1,575 Senior Member
    It actually says on the USCIS that if your adopted child already has a US passport, they may be denied a CIC. I guess the process should have been obtain a CIC first then the passport. Everything was so confusing when they changed the law right at the time of our adoption, that we quickly applied for the passport. We were also going to Canada a few months later (best lasik!) so we wanted to be certain we could get back over the border. This even became more important as it was just a couple of weeks after 9/11.

    https://www.uscis.gov/adoption/bringing-your-internationally-adopted-child-united-states/us-citizenship-adopted-child
  • bearcatfanbearcatfan Registered User Posts: 1,129 Senior Member
    @oldmom4896 When you replaced it did it require a current picture?

    That is one question I do have in all of this, that the COC uses a baby picture (in our case). I've never had to show it anywhere, since long ago their citizenship was connected to their SSNs. I'm getting the girls their graduated driver's licenses this summer (to go on airplanes) and I guess I will find out if our local DMV people blink at cute baby pictures on a COC.
  • oldmom4896oldmom4896 Registered User Posts: 4,022 Senior Member
    @bearcatfan, yes, the application required a new photo.
  • tkoparenttkoparent Registered User Posts: 83 Junior Member
    FWIW, I took our son to the Embassy last week to have his passport renewed, and this time, I just recklessly decided to leave the whole pile of documents at home - CoC, birth certificate and adoption papers together with certified translation, etc. We just took his passport, his student ID, the application form and the fee - and it worked! No questions at all! We also haven't had any questions from the US colleges he's applied to, although we did not apply for financial aid and it seems that's where people are getting most of these questions. In any event, it's nice to know that, at least in some situations, the issue seems to die away with the passage of time.
  • bearcatfanbearcatfan Registered User Posts: 1,129 Senior Member
    So this is a little far afield, but somewhat related ...

    I took my college sophomore to get her enhanced license, and brought her naturalization certificate. They never asked for it. They took her Ohio birth certificate, which clearly stated she was born in China, and she checked the box that she was a US citizen. That was it.

    I am taking my younger daughter to get hers in a couple weeks. I hope it will be as relatively painless.
  • oldmom4896oldmom4896 Registered User Posts: 4,022 Senior Member
    @bearcatfan lol. So much for national security! Did they ask for her passport?
  • bearcatfanbearcatfan Registered User Posts: 1,129 Senior Member
    @oldmom4896 Nope. Hers is expired, anyway (although I had it with me, complete with a cute picture of her at one years old).

    She had all the paperwork, and I was fully expecting to show the certificate, but they never asked for it. I don't know too much about the licenses, to be honest, so I'm not sure if they necessarily prove anything other than you are who you say you are (but I do remember the form asking about citizenship).
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