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Oklahoma colleges are no longer safe for your children-- they legalized sexual assault

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Replies to: Oklahoma colleges are no longer safe for your children-- they legalized sexual assault

  • TorveauxTorveaux 1451 replies10 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,461 Senior Member
    I guess the headline of this thread is tantamount to the same thing. Completely distorting the truth to get a point across. Laws have meanings. The court cannot and should not be in the business of legislating. There were other options to charge and they were not taken. The law could be amended to include additional things if that is the will of the people.

    BTW, very few children attend colleges. Most are adults.
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  • sseamomsseamom 4880 replies25 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 4,905 Senior Member
    @katliamom exactly. A friend of mine lives in OK and has been working on several related issues. They get a lot of pushback, but at least they're getting the word out. How heartbreaking, though, about the story in the OP.
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  • ConsolationConsolation 22849 replies184 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 23,033 Senior Member
    Great news for Oklahoma rapists: just render her unconscious and you can do whatever you want with impunity!
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  • LasMaLasMa 10768 replies138 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 10,906 Senior Member
    Another state for the boycott list.
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  • zoosermomzoosermom 25663 replies594 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,257 Senior Member
    Is the law gender specific? Can only females be victimized? Can only males be assaulters?
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  • zoosermomzoosermom 25663 replies594 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,257 Senior Member
    No. Even if it were, the 14th amendment would kick in.
    I was being facetious. Men and boys are raped and assaulted, too, although that is often fodder for jokes and laughter.
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  • lookingforwardlookingforward 32635 replies349 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,984 Senior Member
    Even the defense attorney seemed to suggest that.

    Thanks, Demosthenes49.
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  • Demosthenes49Demosthenes49 1622 replies4 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 1,626 Senior Member
    @fallenchemist: I don't think the Oklahoma Supreme Court can speak as to proper interpretation of this statute. Oklahoma has a bifurcated court structure, so the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals is the highest court in Oklahoma on criminal matters. It's also the court that made the decision in the OP.
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  • fallenchemistfallenchemist 24269 replies860 discussionsHonorary Super Mod Posts: 25,129 Inactive
    edited April 2016
    @Demosthenes49

    OK, thanks. Every state is different, and I certainly didn't look into the OK particulars. As I said, the more normal route in any state, and apparently the only one in OK, is for the legislature to modify the existing statute or pass a new one.
    edited April 2016
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  • CaliCashCaliCash 2759 replies69 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,828 Senior Member
    @fallenchemist A bit condescending at the end don't you think?
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  • fallenchemistfallenchemist 24269 replies860 discussionsHonorary Super Mod Posts: 25,129 Inactive
    @CaliCash

    No, or I wouldn't have said it. And while I realize I quoted you more than the others, it was really an exasperation over the many, many posts I have read over the years wherein too many people just no longer seem to grasp the fundamentals of things like the above, and even more what the First Amendment really says and how it applies to everyday life in this country. Of course the last has nothing to do with this thread, but it did color my commentary that you cited.
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  • bluebayoubluebayou 26577 replies174 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 26,751 Senior Member
    edited April 2016
    with all due respect, Cali, critical reading of the article that you posted was clear about the law:
    But several legal experts declined to fault the appeals court.....

    Michelle Anderson, the dean of the CUNY School of Law who has written extensively about rape law, called the ruling “appropriate” but the law “archaic”.

    And, from a group that supports victims rights by assisting prosecutors:
    Jennifer Gentile Long, who leads a group, AEquitas, that guides prosecutors in sexual and domestic violence cases, agreed....




    edited April 2016
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