right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
We’ve got a new look! Walk through the key updates here.

Help please: planning first college trip to the US (visiting from the UK)

1161718192022»

Replies to: Help please: planning first college trip to the US (visiting from the UK)

  • londondadlondondad 2090 replies61 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,151 Senior Member
    @Red87 @suzyQ7 Thanks. I think your views are spot-on. When I was at Uni in DC, many of us were getting tired of the campus scene by mid-Junior year so many of us just went into part-time jobs or internships to spend more time on Capital Hill or downtown. Many of our friends who know her well think that Georgetown would be a great fit for her intellect and personality (as well as generally a school that ticks a lot of boxes for many kids) but I want her to make her own decision.
    · Reply · Share
  • brantlybrantly 3689 replies66 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,755 Senior Member
    @londondad Oh, I'm sorry. I didn't mean to offend. It could be nice to live in an area that revolves around the college. Although I can see the point that by senior year it gets kind of old. Also, one thing to keep in mind is that activities in the city are expensive. Most college students can't afford to go to theater or ballet. I have no skin in this game. Just giving my two cents.
    · Reply · Share
  • lookingforwardlookingforward 32206 replies336 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,542 Senior Member
    edited April 2017
    Ha, I went to a truly rural undergrad college and small, to boot. The word "rural" shouldn't even come up for Bowdoin. What Brunswick is, is a small city, fewer major cultural experiences, no major retailers, but plenty of beautiful natural surroundings, as I hope OP saw. (Some of us adore Maine.) Yes, Portland. But what happens is, kids who don't "need" the very big cultural experience of a NYC, Boston or DC, are happily focused on-campus. It's not like, after class or a trip to the library, these places are deserted, just you and the cows mooing.

    Middlebury, otoh, is that much further from substantial "action." Lots and lots of good things to say about the school. But it's what we'd call remote. Much different to get to, from London. For that matter, from Boston, too. No one or two hour trip for the Big City "fix."

    What OP probably saw is that Bowdoin (and to some degree, Wes,) are accessible via the major northeast highway, Route 95. Bowdoin is, as said, 2 or so hours from Boston. Busses run. Wes is less, from NYC. That presents opportunities for a getaway or a meet with parents, during breaks.


    As for southern CA, I'm a true Yankee, it's so "me" in so many ways. But I loved living in southern CA (many years, Go Bruins!) (The difference is, @Lindagaf, I always lived within a few miles of the beach.) (Santa Monica (beach town) is said to be home to one of the largest British ex-pat communities outside the old empire.) The worst weather is really only a few weeks of August into Sept, the rest is moderate.

    In general, though, USC is a wee bit more inland (what, 10 miles? In S. CA terms that's nothing.) But a little more in a smoggier zone. (Someone may want to comment on that.) Yes, there is culture in S. CA, but as opposed to Boston or, in particular, NYC, where you cannot escape it, you have to go looking for it, figure out what's where, etc. And in general, unlike Bos or NYC, more a car culture. Downtown isn't really a walking city.

    edited April 2017
    · Reply · Share
  • londondadlondondad 2090 replies61 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 2,151 Senior Member
    @brantly No problem. Just to pick up on one point about the theatre, when we were at Georgetown one of the drama teachers mentioned that GU has some relationships with the Arena Stage and other local theatres to provide cheap tix to GU students. We did not get a chance to follow-up with her to learn whether these tickets were available very often.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity