right arrow
Examples: Monday, today, last week, Mar 26, 3/26/04
We’ve got a new look! Walk through the key updates here.

Middle schooler transfer to private school for HS pros and cons

14567810»

Replies to: Middle schooler transfer to private school for HS pros and cons

  • LucieTheLakieLucieTheLakie 3895 replies163 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 4,058 Senior Member
    Understood, @JHS. I suspect this probably comes down to specific school districts and specific private schools. I grew up in a very blue-collar district (today with +0.1 grades ahead rating in that NY Times survey) and now live in a more affluent section of a more middle-class one, but neither is remotely competitive academically with Lower Merion (+2.7) or Radnor (+2.9)--the "top districts" in this area (especially with regard to per pupil spending!).

    Also, not all private schools are located in posh towns on the Main Line. There are some smaller gems out there that value more than superficial forms of diversity. Greater Philadelphia has an incredible range of private schools, unlike most areas of the country, and many offer generous financial aid.

    I have no idea where the OP lives in CA and whether or not he has any non-public options along those same lines. A magnet school might be a great alternative, but I suspect it's not an option. So (to bring this back to the original topic), if he has to go into hock for a private school, that just seems crazy to me, given that he's in a good district and his son is doing well there. Especially if the only goal is to get into a top 10 or 20 university. I suspect he lives in a "Lower Merion" district, in which case, I agree with your assessment wholeheartedly.
    · Reply · Share
  • mathmommathmom 31930 replies155 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 32,085 Senior Member
    I have a friend out in CA who chose the private school because as Asian (Indian subcontinent) the local school were dominated by Asians while the private school was more diverse. But that's certainly not true everywhere - even in Silicon Valley.
    · Reply · Share
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl 40168 replies320 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    "Especially if the only goal is to get into a top 10 or 20 university. I suspect he lives in a "Lower Merion" district, in which case, I agree with your assessment wholeheartedly."

    That's kind of what I assumed as well about the OP.
    · Reply · Share
  • eiholieiholi 296 replies16 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 312 Member
    edited September 2016
    I have no idea where the OP lives in CA
    I'm so happy we don't live in CA, NY, or NJ etc. We are in the flyover country where the schools are OK (according to our own standard), no fierce competitions among students, and some of the kids go to top 20 schools. I'm trying to see if mine can increase his chances at his eventual target colleges wherever they rank.
    edited September 2016
    · Reply · Share
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl 40168 replies320 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member
    Eiholi. I'm in the Midwest. I live in a town that sends kids to two different high schools. School A is the New Trier-like high school - tops in the state/nation, lots of educated parents, more 1:1 GC, etc. School B is still a perfectly fine suburban school district, still very good by any measure but more diverse socioeconomically and a lot of the wealth there is driven by success in areas that don't require a fancy college degree (owning car dealerships, selling real estate, etc.) Fewer kids go to elite colleges and there's more of a culture of CC for 2 years and the transfer to U of Illinois due to the lesser affluence.

    My husband grew up in this town and went to School A. Our kids were in School B. In hindsight, it was really the best move. They didn't have the social pressure from peers to go to an elite school, or all the inevitable gossip and comparison, and when their applications were read, they weren't one out of a couple dozen applying. Remember, elite schools get bored with the thirteenth applicant from a high school. Why do you want to be that?

    If some of the kids go to top 20 schools, then you have what you need. You're fine.
    · Reply · Share
  • eiholieiholi 296 replies16 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 312 Member
    @Pizzagirl My town is more likely between A and B, but without the riches (and without the poor). We are not near a big city like Chicago so we don't have a competitive culture. A good thing. But some of the kids are capable. My thinking is that for a comparable education a higher ranked college is cheaper and hence better. The ideal outcome is the student picks where he wants to go.
    · Reply · Share
  • AroundHereAroundHere 3579 replies22 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 3,601 Senior Member
    My thinking is that for a comparable education a higher ranked college is cheaper and hence better. The ideal outcome is the student picks where he wants to go.

    The relationship between "rank" and financial aid and merit scholarship offers is tenuous.
    When you get to the point of building a college list and running NPCs, you will find all sorts of surprises.
    · Reply · Share
  • 1Wife1Kid1Wife1Kid 208 replies2 discussionsRegistered User Posts: 210 Junior Member
    My son went to private schools from Kindergarten. Yes, it cost a lot of money. Had I invested that money instead, he would have a 7 figure trust fund by the time he graduated from college. So why did I not do that?

    It's actually quite simple, I liked the intensely competitive and accomplished peer group and the academic pressure from the teachers that the best private schools in our area bring to the table. My son got a top notch education, something which the best public schools in our area do not even come close to, even though their levels are also very high. This may not help with college admission, but that is OK. There are many colleges in the USA.
    · Reply · Share
This discussion has been closed.

Recent Activity